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Posts from ‘Art Show’

Jul
20

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I can’t claim this is a “trailer,” because it’s not. But that’s a trailer, up there. The former “trailer” would be a preview of what the trailer (up there) is all about, and you may already know because you’ve read about it in the papers, in press releases, etc. The trailer (up there) is one of Jackson Hole Public Art’s new ventures.

Because both trailers are out there I can offer only the remaining dates the trailer (up there) will be making stops around Jackson Hole. They are:

August 1 & 2: Jackson Hole Land Trust’s FoundSpace, Karns Meadow
August 8: Jackson Hole Farmers Market, Town Square 
August 20: POP, North Park on North Cache
 
Ben Roth's Public Art bike racks engaged this boy's creative spirit.

Ben Roth’s Public Art bike racks engaged this child’s creative spirit.

“The Mobile Design Studio is designed to engage the community in the public art process. It’s an on-the-move, imaginative placemaking kit of parts – including café seating, planters, and temporary art – that transforms the space around it through improvisational, creative interventions,” writes JHPA in its release.

After reading this information a few times my impression is that the trailer (up there) is a roving hangout with café style seating on board. Just as art exhibits at Pearl Street Bagels or the Brew Pub rotate, so does the trailer’s (up there) art.
Public Art is always free!

Public Art is always free! Yay!

It’s unclear why the phrase “creative intervention” is used. The word “intervention” forcefully connotes “inserting-yourself-in-the-middle-of-something” or “encouraging-an-addict-to-get-help.”

I think what the trailer (up there) really wants to accomplish is to connect people with creativity. That’s a nice thing. Good luck, trailer (up there)! www.jhpublicart.org

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All kinds of Pop Up Art!

All kinds of Pop Up Art!

Friday, July 24th,  5:00pm – 8:00pm, go check out a groovy pop-up shop, with hand made art by some of Jackson’s favorite young artists. So terrific, these pop-ups! Relatively inexpensive to produce, I would think. It’s happening at Teton Art Lab , 130 S. Jackson Street, in Jackson. Artists include: Lisa Walker Handmade, Eleanor Anderson , Ben Blandon, Rob Hollis, Valerie Seaberg and more. I don’t have contact info, but Seaberg and Walker are the gals to call. Or text, or email, or fb message……Have fun! www.tetonartlab.com 
Jun
23
Tammy Callens, "Bert."  Oil, 20" x 18"

Tammy Callens, “Bert.” Oil, 20″ x 18″

Last summer artist Tammy Callens and I went to visit Bert Raynes. I’d posted an image of Bert on Facebook. Bert, a distinctive bird, caught Callens’ eye. Callens paints portraits, and minutes after spying Bert on my Facebook page she contacted me to find out who this extraordinary man might be.

Callens wanted to paint Bert’s portrait.

“Brilliant,” I thought. Why hadn’t I come up with this? Callens and Bert had never met, but as soon as she expressed interest, my mind leapt at the possibilities. Of all Jackson’s special citizens, who was more deserving of a Callens portrait? Nobody. A “Bert” portrait might raise excellent funds for his beloved non-profit, The Meg and Bert Raynes Foundation.

A year later Callens’ portrait is complete. It’s a stunner. And it’s up for sale as of Friday, June 26th, at Mountain Trails Gallery in Jackson. An opening reception takes place Saturday, June 27th, 4-6:00 pm at the gallery. Callens is donating a significant portion of “Bert” sales proceeds to his foundation. The exhibition, entitled “Soliloquy,” remains on display through July 2nd. 

“The sad thing is, it looks like me,” says Raynes.

Boy, does it. Witty self-deprecation is pure Bert. In fact, he couldn’t be more thrilled. Callens’ spot-on portrait captures Bert as he was the day they met~~handsome in his signature red sweater and suspenders, Bert posed for Callens. Within minutes she’d sketched a lively impression and began playing with color.

“I love painting Bert as he was exactly on the day we met,” Callens recalls. “His life, compassion, knowledge and contributions extend far beyond those of most folks; most of us can’t imagine doing a fraction of his work. I felt his energy immediately and fell completely in love.”

Tammy Callens. "Foghorn Leghorn," Oil.  8 "X 14" Oil

Tammy Callens. “Foghorn Leghorn,” Oil.
8 “X 14”
Oil

Callens’ portrait depicts Bert surrounded with jars, bowls and bottles; symbols of a wellness campaign. Birds, Bert’s life’s work and extended family, are present too. Most importantly, the painting IS Bert. Any “F.O.B.,” (Friend of Bert) sees this immediately. When we’re with Bert, intelligence and sparky conversation are impressed upon us. We learn. He listens. We have a democratic, lifetime experience.

Want to be an F.O.B.? Make a beeline for Mountain Trails Gallery. Get there first. Be the “Bert” buyer. Be the first Jackson Hole “nature mapping” citizen to contribute to Bert’s foundation. Be the first person, as far as I know, to support a worthy cause by bringing home a portrait of a most distinguished bird. www.tammycallens.com , www.mtntrails.net  https://www.facebook.com/JacksonHoleActivities

 

 

May
29

Howdy! I’m back. The Jackson Hole Art Blog is up again! We’ll be writing brief (up to 500 words) weekly posts about Jackson Hole Arts. Summer traffic is turning up early this year, so let’s get going! Send me your news! Email me at tammy@jacksonholearttours.com OR tammychristel@gmail.com.  

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One of Jackson’s most eclectic, sophisticated galleries, Heather James Fine Art, has two locations. Their home gallery is in Palm Springs, California, and its second gallery is here in Jackson. Currently featured is “Arts of Asia,” a stunning artifacts collection.

“Antiquities loaded with historical, ritual, and cultural richness weave an intricate story of centuries of dynasties and eras in Arts of Asia,” says the gallery. “Spanning 2,000 years, the objects in the show are organized by geography: China, Japan, and India & Southeast Asia.”

Heather James’ new series of online catalogs are beautifully composed. View catalogs of this and other Heather James collections at www.heatherjames.com 

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Brent Cotton VALLEY EVENING oil on linen 20 x 24 in

Brent Cotton
VALLEY EVENING
oil on linen
20 x 24 in

Jackson’s Trailside Galleries presents “Fleeting Effects of Light,” a show of new works by Brent Cotton. Light is the thing in our valley. Our light wears infinite guises, an artist’s eternal muse.

“Raised on his family’s cattle ranch in Idaho, Brent’s first lessons in art were taught by his grandmother, a talented watercolorist. He grew up sketching the cowboys and horses he observed every day. In high school an influential instructor encouraged him to pursue a career in art,” says Trailside. “Cotton attended workshops and studied with some of the best known names in wildlife and Western art, including world-renowned Western artist Howard Terpning.”

“Fleeting Effects of Light” runs June 1 – June 30, 2015 at Trailside. An Open House and ArtWalk (which includes many galleries around town) takes place June 18, 5-7 pm.  www.trailsidegalleries.com 

Mar
31

Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at aajhsubmissions@gmail.com, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.

www.artassociation.org

Jan
09
Todd Kosharek - Late July, 2013 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Late July, 2013 – 14 x 26″

“What I love in painting, as an artist and as a viewer, is the feeling I get from seeing something…meticulously created by pigment and brush. I want to see time – time taken by the painter to think, feel and create – but also the element of time, as if the painting … will grow and change with me … as I grow and change.” ~ Todd Kosharek

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works, “Interiors/Exteriors,” at the Jackson Hole Center for the Arts Theater Lobby with a reception on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. The exhibition will be on display January 13th – 29th, 2014.

Images of Kosharek’s new works blow me away. In a short time — although Kosharek may not share my conception of  what comprises a “short time” — his landscape painting style has blossomed and matured, gaining a notably new level of sophistication. Kosharek’s painting “Late July, 2013,” shown above, is so rhythmic and complete; it’s like a fine jigsaw puzzle with all the pieces fit perfectly together. He’s thought of everything: a peach sky is reflected perfectly in a body of water. The water, rather than being just a pond or just a river, is both. Space and atmosphere Kosharek builds between land and the sky’s ceiling—those clouds—provides “air” that breathes into the scene and opens it up. He has broadened his color palette without going overboard, limiting his colors and also simultaneously creating the number of subtle shadings required. Kosharek’s brushstrokes are more coherent, more secure, drawing together his composition’s elements.

The growing and changing is happening. Most definitely.

Todd Kosharek - Last of October - 2014 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Last of October – 2014 – 14 x 26″

A remarkable hallmark of Kosharek’s work is that he paints in two blazingly different styles. There are his landscapes, influenced by the Scandinavian Symbolists, and his interior paintings, rooted in the Magic Realist tradition. These fastidiously detailed and mystical works, his Origami Crane Series, consist of 12 large paintings exploring the concepts of repetition and life, religion and art. Kosharek takes many months to complete any given crane painting and is thrilled to be exhibiting three works of the series in this show. At this writing, Kosharek was putting the finishing touches on a crane painting that’s been coming to life on his easel for a full year.

Todd Kosharek - Veneer - 2012 - 66 x 50"

Todd Kosharek – Veneer – 2012 – 66 x 50″

“I throw everything possible into the scene during the sketching and researching process, and then slowly eliminate aspects until the scene clicks and is suddenly correct. This process of elimination will often continue all the way until the painting is finished,” says Kosharek. “Great examples of this process are the three large paintings that are a part of the Crane Series.”

A great painting, adds Kosharek, should encourage and allow viewers to react to space, letting them follow any direction the painting may beckon. His paintings are part of private and public collections throughout America and in Paris.

“Art should not be in a box nor should it be “right or wrong,” nor should it hold the viewer’s hand,” says the artist. “The greatest respect an artist can give an audience is to trust that they will get what they need from the work.”  www.toddkosharek.com

1497504_10202870754911208_157654252_nThursday, January 9th, 7-10 pm, artist Tom Woodhouse’s “creative passion” will be on exhibit and celebrated at the Pink Garter Theater/The Rose, downtown Jackson. The evening is the first in a series of art events happening this month; Tom’s show will change and evolve each week. Paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, abstracts, bar scenes and landscapes will all be featured. And yes, you can buy them!

Contact: Not sure! Posters list the Pink Garter, so give that venue a jingle. Go, Tom!

Last notice: Community Supported Art (CSA) inaugural year applications are due on Monday, January 13th! Read more about the project here, and contact Alissa Davies at csajacksonhole@gmail.com, for more information.

My bad…Public Art announcements were going to appear here, but I promise—next post you will see them!