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Posts from ‘Arts Events’



I can’t claim this is a “trailer,” because it’s not. But that’s a trailer, up there. The former “trailer” would be a preview of what the trailer (up there) is all about, and you may already know because you’ve read about it in the papers, in press releases, etc. The trailer (up there) is one of Jackson Hole Public Art’s new ventures.

Because both trailers are out there I can offer only the remaining dates the trailer (up there) will be making stops around Jackson Hole. They are:

August 1 & 2: Jackson Hole Land Trust’s FoundSpace, Karns Meadow
August 8: Jackson Hole Farmers Market, Town Square 
August 20: POP, North Park on North Cache
Ben Roth's Public Art bike racks engaged this boy's creative spirit.

Ben Roth’s Public Art bike racks engaged this child’s creative spirit.

“The Mobile Design Studio is designed to engage the community in the public art process. It’s an on-the-move, imaginative placemaking kit of parts – including café seating, planters, and temporary art – that transforms the space around it through improvisational, creative interventions,” writes JHPA in its release.

After reading this information a few times my impression is that the trailer (up there) is a roving hangout with café style seating on board. Just as art exhibits at Pearl Street Bagels or the Brew Pub rotate, so does the trailer’s (up there) art.
Public Art is always free!

Public Art is always free! Yay!

It’s unclear why the phrase “creative intervention” is used. The word “intervention” forcefully connotes “inserting-yourself-in-the-middle-of-something” or “encouraging-an-addict-to-get-help.”

I think what the trailer (up there) really wants to accomplish is to connect people with creativity. That’s a nice thing. Good luck, trailer (up there)!


All kinds of Pop Up Art!

All kinds of Pop Up Art!

Friday, July 24th,  5:00pm – 8:00pm, go check out a groovy pop-up shop, with hand made art by some of Jackson’s favorite young artists. So terrific, these pop-ups! Relatively inexpensive to produce, I would think. It’s happening at Teton Art Lab , 130 S. Jackson Street, in Jackson. Artists include: Lisa Walker Handmade, Eleanor Anderson , Ben Blandon, Rob Hollis, Valerie Seaberg and more. I don’t have contact info, but Seaberg and Walker are the gals to call. Or text, or email, or fb message……Have fun! 
Charles M. Russell (1864–1926) Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in  Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

Charles M. Russell (1864–1926)
Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in
Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

This year’s Jackson Hole Art Auction is two months away; time flies. After all, it’s summer and high art season in Jackson, Wyoming. Stay on your toes, keep a daily eye out for new auction lots! Get your consignments in on time~~2015’s deadline opportunity has likely evaporated. So many impressive consignments arrive at auction headquarters, upstairs at Trailside Gallery, that some must be put forward for your consideration.

Whether it’s market confidence or simply a new method of expanding their buying audience, the auction spreads itself over two days this year, with two separate buying events. The auction, a premier venue for Western masterworks, begins September 18th, 2015.

“The ninth annual Jackson Hole Art Auction will begin with Session I held on Friday, September 18th at Trailside Galleries in Jackson, WY. Session I will be a small well-curated sale of lots by highly desirable contemporary and deceased artists. Session II will be held on Saturday, September 19th at the Center for the Arts,” notes the auction. Both events include free, open-to-the-public preview opportunities.

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4".  Oil $40,000 -$60,000

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4″. Oil $40,000 -$60,000

So, what’s on the auction menu? It’s impossible to provide a full list in this space, but highlights include historic and contemporary works by Bierstadt, C.M. Russell, Bob Kuhn, Carl Rungius, Howard Terpning, Z.S. Liang, Remington, E. Martin Hennings, Clyde Aspevig, Richard Schmid, Harry JacksonEanger Irving Couse, T. Allen LawsonStanley Meltzoff and William Acheff.

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse - Mule Deer (1995)

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse – Mule Deer (1995) Acrylic on Board  14×18″ Estimate: $40,000 – $60,000

Lot estimates range anywhere from four digits to seven.

Though not an official part of Jackson Hole’s famed Fall Arts Festival, the auction is a heady and highly anticipated conclusion to Jackson’s official arts season. Live Western auctions cause attendees and staff to break out in goosebumps. This thing is full of adrenaline~~the auction has become one of the country’s top Western art auctions, each year offering up exquisite paintings, sculptures and artifacts. A co-production of Jackson’s Trailside Galleries and Santa Fe’s Gerald Peters Gallery, the auction is an upscale, professionally organized and thrilling event.

Visit for information, or phone Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan at (866)-549-9276.

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860) oil on canvas 28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902)
Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860)
oil on canvas
28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in
Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000




Tammy Callens, "Bert."  Oil, 20" x 18"

Tammy Callens, “Bert.” Oil, 20″ x 18″

Last summer artist Tammy Callens and I went to visit Bert Raynes. I’d posted an image of Bert on Facebook. Bert, a distinctive bird, caught Callens’ eye. Callens paints portraits, and minutes after spying Bert on my Facebook page she contacted me to find out who this extraordinary man might be.

Callens wanted to paint Bert’s portrait.

“Brilliant,” I thought. Why hadn’t I come up with this? Callens and Bert had never met, but as soon as she expressed interest, my mind leapt at the possibilities. Of all Jackson’s special citizens, who was more deserving of a Callens portrait? Nobody. A “Bert” portrait might raise excellent funds for his beloved non-profit, The Meg and Bert Raynes Foundation.

A year later Callens’ portrait is complete. It’s a stunner. And it’s up for sale as of Friday, June 26th, at Mountain Trails Gallery in Jackson. An opening reception takes place Saturday, June 27th, 4-6:00 pm at the gallery. Callens is donating a significant portion of “Bert” sales proceeds to his foundation. The exhibition, entitled “Soliloquy,” remains on display through July 2nd. 

“The sad thing is, it looks like me,” says Raynes.

Boy, does it. Witty self-deprecation is pure Bert. In fact, he couldn’t be more thrilled. Callens’ spot-on portrait captures Bert as he was the day they met~~handsome in his signature red sweater and suspenders, Bert posed for Callens. Within minutes she’d sketched a lively impression and began playing with color.

“I love painting Bert as he was exactly on the day we met,” Callens recalls. “His life, compassion, knowledge and contributions extend far beyond those of most folks; most of us can’t imagine doing a fraction of his work. I felt his energy immediately and fell completely in love.”

Tammy Callens. "Foghorn Leghorn," Oil.  8 "X 14" Oil

Tammy Callens. “Foghorn Leghorn,” Oil.
8 “X 14”

Callens’ portrait depicts Bert surrounded with jars, bowls and bottles; symbols of a wellness campaign. Birds, Bert’s life’s work and extended family, are present too. Most importantly, the painting IS Bert. Any “F.O.B.,” (Friend of Bert) sees this immediately. When we’re with Bert, intelligence and sparky conversation are impressed upon us. We learn. He listens. We have a democratic, lifetime experience.

Want to be an F.O.B.? Make a beeline for Mountain Trails Gallery. Get there first. Be the “Bert” buyer. Be the first Jackson Hole “nature mapping” citizen to contribute to Bert’s foundation. Be the first person, as far as I know, to support a worthy cause by bringing home a portrait of a most distinguished bird. ,




Howdy! I’m back. The Jackson Hole Art Blog is up again! We’ll be writing brief (up to 500 words) weekly posts about Jackson Hole Arts. Summer traffic is turning up early this year, so let’s get going! Send me your news! Email me at OR  


One of Jackson’s most eclectic, sophisticated galleries, Heather James Fine Art, has two locations. Their home gallery is in Palm Springs, California, and its second gallery is here in Jackson. Currently featured is “Arts of Asia,” a stunning artifacts collection.

“Antiquities loaded with historical, ritual, and cultural richness weave an intricate story of centuries of dynasties and eras in Arts of Asia,” says the gallery. “Spanning 2,000 years, the objects in the show are organized by geography: China, Japan, and India & Southeast Asia.”

Heather James’ new series of online catalogs are beautifully composed. View catalogs of this and other Heather James collections at 

Brent Cotton VALLEY EVENING oil on linen 20 x 24 in

Brent Cotton
oil on linen
20 x 24 in

Jackson’s Trailside Galleries presents “Fleeting Effects of Light,” a show of new works by Brent Cotton. Light is the thing in our valley. Our light wears infinite guises, an artist’s eternal muse.

“Raised on his family’s cattle ranch in Idaho, Brent’s first lessons in art were taught by his grandmother, a talented watercolorist. He grew up sketching the cowboys and horses he observed every day. In high school an influential instructor encouraged him to pursue a career in art,” says Trailside. “Cotton attended workshops and studied with some of the best known names in wildlife and Western art, including world-renowned Western artist Howard Terpning.”

“Fleeting Effects of Light” runs June 1 – June 30, 2015 at Trailside. An Open House and ArtWalk (which includes many galleries around town) takes place June 18, 5-7 pm. 


Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.