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Apr
23

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“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” ~ Mary Oliver

Well, give my heart to all of you. That’s one thing, and after a while I’ll be doing it again. In less than a month I depart Jackson Hole for an extended stay in my New England home. I’ve been reading your emails and resisting my own default button: write a blog post! Surrounded by brown boxes, packing tape, piles and piles of stuff I didn’t know I had, and an ever-shifting list of moving chores, I’ve had to curtail writing about art. 

"Passage #39" - Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x72"

I miss it so. I will miss you deeply. You artists, you galleries, you museums and auctions, you wild and crazy fun events, salons, exhibits, Fall Arts Festivals~~~and most of all, the blissful, heavenly days spent out in Grand Teton National Park watching painters capture this beauty~~~feeling so proud to be present. To get to tell the world about your adventures, even as I’m on my own adventure. There’s so much more to learn. This website, together with soaking in the West’s stupendous art histories, has changed my life.

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Thank you for your trust and respect. Thank you for allowing me to share with the world (and the world does see!) the power of Jackson Hole art. Once I’ve settled some, I’ll be back to thinking and writing about you.

I’m proud of the Jackson Hole Art Blogsix years old, plus. This is post #541.

971071_575727195817073_81363745_nI know the Blog’s mission is appreciated. It’s the first blog of its kind in Jackson. Most importantly, I love you all and am blessed by your friendship, your support and the countless projects we’ve shared. We started something! I’m grateful for my experiences and affiliations with the Grand Teton Association and Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters, Artists in the Environment, Greg McHuron, Bert Raynes, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, Altamira Fine Art, the Brookover Gallery, Trio Fine Art, Homestead Magazine, our newspapers, Jackson’s Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson Hole Art Auction, Wyoming ArtsWyoming Public Media and all Blog sponsors. Each and every artist!

With any luck I’ll pull my head out of the basement and see you in the coming weeks. If we miss one another, you know where to reach me, and I know where to reach you.

Look outside your immediate selves and your generation; rescue whenever possible and appropriate. Volunteer in places and for causes that aren’t “sexy.” Stay honest.

Keep sending your news. Though I can’t write about them for a while, I always want to hear what you’re doing with your wild and precious lives.

Namasté!   ~~~~ Tammy

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Feb
28

In a few months I will be moving back to the east coast. Family calls. The length of time I’ll be away is temporary and open-ended. I’m grateful, more than I can express, for the loving, caring and supportive messages I’ve received from so many of you. I carry you all in my heart. Posts may “spread out” for a while as I manage logistics, and the Blog may change its focus or form ~~~ but it’s not disappearing. We’re joined, and we’ll remain joined!  Okay, I might write a poem if I keep on. It wouldn’t be a good poem, so time to write about what’s happening in Jackson!

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

The Jackson Hole Art Auction is rapidly receiving an inventory of fine masterworks to  be auctioned off Saturday, September 14, 2014.  This John Clymer is remarkable! Something about it quickens my pulse. Important artists already represented in this year’s auction: Oscar Berninghaus, John Clymer, Bob Kuhn, Ken Riley and Richard Schmid. Schmid’s diminutive painting of carnations was the surprise star of last year’s auction, selling many times over its estimate. Kuhn’s “Resting Cat”, a 22 x 42 acrylic on board, is estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

“The painting was the last Prix de West entry the artist completed in his lifetime, and was awarded the Major General and Mrs. Don Pittman Wildlife Award,” notes the auction.

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42"

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42″

Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan emphasizes that the public is welcome to stop by the auction offices to learn more about this year’s event. As always, the auction is seeking fine art consignments; I expect offerings to be welcomed into the summer season. For a complimentary, confidential evaluation please call 866-549-9278, visit www.jacksonholeartauction.com or stop by the offices in Trailside Galleries at 130 East Broadway, Jackson, WY — or 7330 Scottsdale Mall, Scottsdale, AZ. www.jacksonholeartauction.com

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

“The Straw That Broke” is an “environmental thriller” written by Jackson’s Gregory Zeigler; the same author who brought us his recreated tale of Steinbeck’s “Travels with Charlie.” It’s Steinbeck’s 112th birthday as I write this. The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s own Jane Lavino created the cover art, and it’s awesome! What up, girl?  We need a Lavino exhibition! Promotional copy for Zeigler’s book sums up the plot: “A young scientist and free spirit, Lyn Burke, gets caught up in a battle between ecoterrorists and corrupt public officials over water in the drought-stricken desert Southwest. Lyn’s disappearance causes police officer Susan Brand and private investigator Jake Goddard to rush to her aid. Abduction, deceit, and murder threaten a cataclysm that places the entire region in jeopardy.” 

Wow, I’m thinking “Longmire!” If the book is as good as that TV series, it’s going to have you on the edge of your seat. Congrats to Greg and Jane! Check it out: www.gzeiglerbooks.com

Tammy Callens - Through the Aspen Grove - 36x18" Oil

Tammy Callens – Through the Aspen Grove – 36×18″ Oil

Plein air painter and portraitist Tammy Callens has a show of new works at Mountain Trails Gallery, in Jackson. Callens feels these paintings break new ground for her as an artist. I’ve always been a fan. Her work is romantic, impressionistic, marked by realism and personal. Callens has another quality: she’s humble about her work. I feel her intimate landscapes are some of the most captivating in town.

Callens sparked the idea of  pro-actively inviting children to participate in plein air painting demonstrations. She did this unwittingly, two summers ago during one of our “Artists in the Environment” events in Grand Teton National Park. Callens painted a difficult scene with great skill, and her most ardent admirers were young people visiting the Park, making their own memories by painting the wilderness explored on their summer vacations. It doesn’t get better than that! www.tammycallens.com 

Jan
14

musical_notesAn opening note: Many visual arts events are posted on Facebook; I love seeing those, but if you would like to submit your project or event to the Jackson Hole Art Blog, emailing me directly works MUCH better. I’ll definitely see your announcement, and it won’t get lost in the Facebook shuffle. I’ll remember it. Don’t be shy, email me at: tammy@jacksonholearttours.com. Include all relevant details. I’m a one-person gig, and can’t get every event listed—but I want everyone to have the best chance possible. And don’t forget to send those nice, big images too. Superb.

197If you receive the Community Foundation’s emails via their Listserve, you may have noticed an individual misusing that venue to comment on J.H. Public Art projects. Whatever that person’s goal, he was going at it inappropriately, and that pretty much nulls and voids his input.

There is quite a bit going on in the world of public art here in Jackson. The 5-way project is on, and there are other new projects: the South Cache Street Custom Pavers and Street Painting Project, and another bike-related job.

South Cache first: The project’s total budget is $18,000, to be divided between pavers and painters; $15K for the former, $3,000 for the latter. There are more than a couple of definitions of “paver.” One is a paving vehicle, another is actual concrete used alongside highways and streets. Pavers can also be decorative brick drive and street surfaces. That’s what we’re talkin’ about!

J.H. Public Art writes that “selected artists will fabricate custom pavers designed to integrate into the overall paving pattern. The artist will replicate the theme and key imagery used in the pavers into two, one-color street paintings designed to highlight new crosswalks along the corridor. The budget supports design and fabrication of custom pavers and the street painting.”

Artists will work with Public Works, and Public Works will install what the artist creates. There are several ways it can work, but to make sure you’ve got the drill right, contact J.H. Public Art, or visit their website, where specs are provided.

The “Town Bike Network Education Icons Project” is essentially sign design. Budget: $4,500.

Design an “iconic” sign design series for Jackson’s signposts marking the town’s bike network. Graphics, says J.H. Public Art, “will be designed to print on 12 x 18” standard street signs using 2-4 color process. Final artwork should be submitted as vector files. The artist will design a series of 5-7 bold images that are easy to read from a distance or [while the viewer is] in motion. Graphics should identify safe practices, particular bike routes, unique features of the routes and promote educational messages sponsored by the Pathways department. School children, visitors and residents of all ages use the bike network and imagery should be easy to understand, family-friendly and promote community values.”

In other words, these signs need to be understood immediately by anyone; sign language must be universal.

Applications are due by February 3, 2014.  The web sign-in spot is www.callforentry.org.  Learn more here: http://www.jhpublicart.org/opportunities-2/

 

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

“Nick’s exquisite photographs arouse deep emotions. They inspire a sense of awe at the beauty of creation and the sacredness of life. It is almost impossible to look through his work without sensing the personalities of the beings whom he has photographed.” ~ Jane Goodall

Just when you think wildlife photography can’t get any more powerful, along comes an exhibition like “Elegy: The African Photography of Nick Brandt, 2001-2008.” Opening at the National Museum of Wildlife Art January 18th, it remains on display through August 10, 2014.

Continue Reading

Dec
08
Robert Adams, Nehalem Bay State Park, from This Day, 2009

Robert Adams, Nehalem Bay State Park, from This Day, 2009

As I write this, it’s blowing, snowy and not fit weather for much, save reflection. So I thought I’d tell you about Robert Adams. 

A week ago a friend gifted me a copy of a Barry Lopez essay, “Learning to See.” Lopez’s subject is American landscape photographer Robert Adams, and the essay can be found in Lopez’s book About This Life: Journeys on the Threshold of Memory.

When I read something this powerful, it’s hard to take in. I read slowly, bit by bit, over a period of days. Then I re-read it. Knowing less about photography than I do painting and other art mediums–at least photography’s technical aspects–I’m no doubt embarrassing myself here. I’d not heard of  Robert Adams. Looking at his work on line I discovered a collection at the Yale Art Museum’s collection, and I hope to visit it this holiday season.

Can’t hold a candle to Lopez, so I’ll share a bit of his writing about Adams.

41E3YB4B4DL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_“His black and white images are intelligently composed and morally engaged. They’re also hopeful, despite their sometimes depressing subject matter—-brutalized landscapes and the venality of the American Dream as revealed in suburban life….He photographs with compassion and he doesn’t scold….His pictures are also accessible, to such a degree that many of them seem casual….If there is such a thing as an ideal of stance, technique, vision and social contribution toward which young photographers might aspire, it’s embodied in this man.”

Seems a fine thing for young photographers, and everyone, to contemplate heading into this season. Here is a link to a New York Times review of Adams’ book BEAUTY IN PHOTOGRAPHY: Essays in Defense of Traditional Values.

Heron Glass

Heron Glass

Over snowy Teton Pass, Driggs, Idaho’s Heron Glass holds its annual holiday open house and studio sale on Saturday, December 14th, 10am – 5pm, at their shop on 240 North 5th Street.  All are welcome to stop by and, if you are a glass lover, take your time feeling like a kid in a candy shop.

Heron Glass also wants you to know that  on the same day, in Driggs, Guchiebird’s, The Local Galleria, The Back 40 and Rick’s will “be hopping,” and TAC ceramics and print-making studios will be doing demos and open houses. AND, the Craft Attack show happens at the Driggs City Center, while Santa’s Workshop debuts at Tony’s Pizza and Pasta. Shop, eat, be merry! www.heronglass.com

Nov
05
Shannon Troxler - Cobalt and Sapphires

Shannon Troxler – Cobalt and Sapphires

Jackson Hole artist Shannon Troxler has new encaustic paintings on display November 7 – December 27, 2013, at the Teton County Library.  The artist will participate in a free opening reception for her show, “Missing Pages,” on Thursday, November 14th, from  5-7 p.m. An artist’s talk takes place at 6 p.m.

“The title of the show came about because my family and friends would complain that books I lent them had missing pages,” says Troxler. “Each of my paintings will have a clue to a literary subject’s identity, such as a quote—the pages are part of the art—and I’ll have a table full of books I’ve used. The idea is to figure out which painting matches which book; some are very easy and some more difficult.”

Troxler’s project began six months ago when she painted a small work depicting Alice and the White Rabbit for the Art Association’s “Whodunnit.” Once under way, Troxler found it hard to stop.

“I have always had a passion for books, but now I was obsessed. I would wake up and think ‘Oh, I should do Jane Eyre!’ I’d find the book, reread it, decide which pages were relevant, and imagine how Jane would look and how I could capture her in paint and encaustic wax. For Jane, I ended up burning page edges, in reference to the book’s fire scenes. Something I like about this show are the paintings’ layers, meant to reflect each book’s layers of meaning. Some will enjoy these paintings as simple portraits or landscapes, and those who have read these books may pick up on more subtleties,” says the artist.

Shannon Troxler - Emma

Shannon Troxler – Emma

Troxler hopes to encourage discussion of the classics and their iconic characters, so much a part of our lexicon. As a subject, narrative is a departure for Troxler; many artists “shy away” from approaching literary stories in their work, she says. Though she studied art in the classical tradition and enjoys painting figures, she has never wanted to paint portraits and each of these works presented a challenge. Here, Troxler imagines how characters look and feel, a liberating experience. The combination of oil and wax creates lovely, translucent layers, allowing her to carve surfaces with subtle detail.

“I feel like I am just getting started, I can imagine so many more characters and series, musicians and sheet music for example. Cookbooks! I’m beginning to explore the concept of this being a traveling exhibit,” says Troxler.

Shannon Troxler - Twinkle, Twinkle

Shannon Troxler – Twinkle, Twinkle

It’s rather wonderful that book pages and journals, and how women manipulate or interpret the written word, are a reoccurring theme in recent weeks. This must mean something!

For information, contact Adult Humanities Coordinator Oona Doherty, 733-2164 ext. 135, or email odoherty@tclib.org. The library notes that pARTners will also celebrate classic literature November 13-30th, with literary-inspired art by local high school students on display at the library.   www.shannontroxlerfineart.com   www.tclib.org

Scott Christensen - I See a Pale Moon Rising - 24 x 30"

Scott Christensen – I See a Pale Moon Rising – 24 x 30″

Noted plein air painter Scott Christensen will host a November opening for a series of new works at his downtown Victor, Idaho studio. A reception and sale for “A Painter’s Travels”  takes place on Saturday, November 23rd, 3:00 pm, at 10 S. Main Street, in Victor. I will go out on a wintry limb and assume works shall continue to be for sale after that date and into the holidays.

A lovely time of year, and opportunity, to view Christensen’s latest works and meet the artist. For more information contact Casey at 208.787.5851, or email art@christensenstudio.com. www.christensenstudio.com

Crafting glass at Laurie Thal's studio, 2012.

Crafting glass at Laurie Thal’s studio, 2012.

Glass blower Laurie Thal is opening up her studio again this holiday season—come blow your own glass balls! (Sorry, there’s just no getting around that joke!)  It’s a great time, Thal leads participants through each step of the process, and everyone goes home with a beautiful, hand made ornament.

Dates: November 12 – January 12, 2014. Groups of no less than four people can sign up, and the cost is $30/per person–$20 to make a second ornament.  Phone 307.733.5096 or email thallaurie@gmail.com.