Category Archives: Ceramics

Mobile Design Studio Trailer; Pop Up Shop!

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I can’t claim this is a “trailer,” because it’s not. But that’s a trailer, up there. The former “trailer” would be a preview of what the trailer (up there) is all about, and you may already know because you’ve read about it in the papers, in press releases, etc. The trailer (up there) is one of Jackson Hole Public Art’s new ventures.

Because both trailers are out there I can offer only the remaining dates the trailer (up there) will be making stops around Jackson Hole. They are:

August 1 & 2: Jackson Hole Land Trust’s FoundSpace, Karns Meadow
August 8: Jackson Hole Farmers Market, Town Square 
August 20: POP, North Park on North Cache
 
Ben Roth's Public Art bike racks engaged this boy's creative spirit.

Ben Roth’s Public Art bike racks engaged this child’s creative spirit.

“The Mobile Design Studio is designed to engage the community in the public art process. It’s an on-the-move, imaginative placemaking kit of parts – including café seating, planters, and temporary art – that transforms the space around it through improvisational, creative interventions,” writes JHPA in its release.

After reading this information a few times my impression is that the trailer (up there) is a roving hangout with café style seating on board. Just as art exhibits at Pearl Street Bagels or the Brew Pub rotate, so does the trailer’s (up there) art.
Public Art is always free!

Public Art is always free! Yay!

It’s unclear why the phrase “creative intervention” is used. The word “intervention” forcefully connotes “inserting-yourself-in-the-middle-of-something” or “encouraging-an-addict-to-get-help.”

I think what the trailer (up there) really wants to accomplish is to connect people with creativity. That’s a nice thing. Good luck, trailer (up there)! www.jhpublicart.org

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All kinds of Pop Up Art!

All kinds of Pop Up Art!

Friday, July 24th,  5:00pm – 8:00pm, go check out a groovy pop-up shop, with hand made art by some of Jackson’s favorite young artists. So terrific, these pop-ups! Relatively inexpensive to produce, I would think. It’s happening at Teton Art Lab , 130 S. Jackson Street, in Jackson. Artists include: Lisa Walker Handmade, Eleanor Anderson , Ben Blandon, Rob Hollis, Valerie Seaberg and more. I don’t have contact info, but Seaberg and Walker are the gals to call. Or text, or email, or fb message……Have fun! www.tetonartlab.com 

22, You View, You! – Art Association Hat Trick

Jennifer Hoffman - Flat Creek Breakdown

Jennifer Hoffman – Flat Creek Breakdown

Bushwhacking through dense underbrush and tangled bunches of new and old-growth forest one afternoon with two of the three Trio Fine Art artists, I finally “got” what determination means when it comes to plain air painting. I’ve loved and been close to plain air for decades, but rarely get a chance to go with painters to protected, coveted painting sites. This day was different, and following the footsteps of Jennifer Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk as they marked a painting spot on protected land can be defined, without hesitation, as adventure.

When bellowing bull elk bear down on you, suggesting you’d be better off moving some yards to the south, you pick up your paint box and move it. Hoffman tells the story of that day much better than I; We ventured out on the Ladd property. You think you know what you’re doing, but this valley is always full of surprises…read the story here.

Kathryn Turner - Mead Ranch

Kathryn Turner – Mead Ranch

View22: Painting Jackson Hole’s Open Spaces is a collaboration and fundraiser art exhibition featuring the works of artists Kathryn Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk. The exhibition’s opening reception takes place Friday, December 6th, at Trio Fine Art on North Cache. Time is 5-8 pm, with artists’ remarks beginning at 6pm. The exhibition remains up through December 21st. A portion of exhibition sales benefit the Jackson Hole Land Trust.

Drawing inspiration from Thomas Moran, the painter responsible for capturing Yellowstone’s rugged beauty so magnificently that Congress declared it and Grand Teton as national parks, View 22 celebrates the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s conservation efforts that have so dramatically affected our open spaces, and works to further cement the eternal bond between art and nature.

Bill Sawczuk - Hardeman Barn

Bill Sawczuk – Hardeman Barn

This past summer and early fall saw Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk visiting an array of preserved open spaces, often not available to the public, and painting their landscapes, wildlife and historic valley structures. Besides benefitting the Land Trust, this show shines a light on special land tracts many of us don’t get a chance to see. Or, if you have had the luck to visit them, you may view each of these places anew. Eighteen protected properties were captured en plein air for the project; 23,000 acres have been protected by the Land Trust.

“As full-time landscape painters in Jackson Hole, we have a vital interest in the preservation of open space within our valley. It is the natural beauty found in wide open spaces that inspires our creativity. Through sharing our interpretations of the landscape, we hope to shine a spotlight on the importance of conservation efforts made possible by the Jackson Hole Land Trust,” said Turner, Hoffman, and Sawczuk.

A View 22 produced video of the artists, their activities and several locations they visited can be viewed here.

Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews is thrilled with Trio Fine Art’s commitment. “Through Trio’s artists’ deep understanding of how the valley’s protected open spaces affect their daily lives, and [through] their talent and creativity, they’ve shown us all a very special view of [the Land Trust’s] work.”

For more information contact Trio Fine Art at 307.734.4444, or phone the Land Trust’s Leslie Steen at 307.733.4707. Email: leslie@jhlandtrust.org   www.triofineart.com  www.jhlandtrust.org  

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Altamira’s Scottsdale Gallery; Bright Wyoming Arts; New Shows At A.A.

Altamira's Mark Tarrant - Courtesy Southwest Art

Altamira’s Mark Tarrant – Courtesy Southwest Art

Is there any doubt that Altamira Fine Art changes things up as fast as humanly possible?  The gallery is a powerhouse, turning its artists into big stars. This summer Altamira opened a new show every two weeks, and each, save Nieto’s, featured two to three artists.

Now Altamira Fine Art is opening a second gallery in Scottsdale, Arizona. A Grand Opening is scheduled for Thursday, November 7th, 7-9:00 pm (taking advantage of Scottsdale’s “Fall for the Arts” ArtWalk). Location: 7038 E. Main Street, Scottsdale, AZ, in the Downtown Arts District. Artists Glenn Dean and R. Tom Gilleon will be featured at the opening.

The new gallery will provide a unique presence in Scottsdale. A boutique gallery, Scottsdale’s Altamira is being designed at a scale of approximately 1800 square feet.

“Our Arizona clients have been asking when we might open a Scottsdale gallery,” Altamira director Mark Tarrant said. “Now we can serve important markets in two locations.” Tarrant founded Jackson’s gallery in 2009, immediately capturing the best of the Western Contemporary art market. Scottsdale’s Altamira Fine Art will focus on the secondary art market—artwork being sold after its initial sale.

Congratulations, Mark! Success breeds success! However: please don’t be a stranger and get to likin’ Scottsdale TOO much!

For more information, phone 307.739.4700. www.altamiraart.com 

Lovell, Wyoming's Hyart Theater

Lovell, Wyoming’s Hyart Theater

A highlight of last week’s Wyoming Arts Council (WAC) annual conference was listening to stories and presentations by artists around the state able to realize projects and gain audiences with the help of WAC. It’s so difficult for us all to be together, and e-communications and conferences offer connectivity and provide perspective. Two WAC state “Bright Spots” are Lovell’s Hyart Film Festival and Wyoming Fiber Trails.

Just over 2,000 people populate Lovell, Wyoming, but that didn’t stop Lovell resident Jason Zeller from founding the Hyart Film Festival. Lovell’s Hyart Theater, the festival’s home, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Built in the 1950’s, it’s an awesome piece of period architecture, a location scout’s dream. Zeller, a film buff,  has accomplished a feat; he spoke about his festival with infectious passion and humor. Having attended countless film festivals, he found he didn’t like a lot of them. Existing festivals were either overpriced, pretentious, or focused on themes Zeller deemed over-exposed and predictable.

So, he fixed his sights on building his own film festival. Zeller wasn’t interested in exploring other locations; Lovell was it.  There was this really cool theater, after all!  Film-goers love it—-they post testimonials expressing how much the revitalized theater means to them—read those testimonials here. Zeller has shown cultural films produced in Afghanistan and Australia; film categories also include horror, children’s films and dramatic entries. He’d love to see more Wyoming films submit to the Festival, so log on to Hyart’s website here, and get in touch with Zeller.

Lakota Ceremonial Shield, 1880-1900

Lakota Ceremonial Shield, 1880-1900

Everyone enjoy a good trail, but there’s an especially creative, historic trail winding its way around Wyoming. Wyoming’s citizens are mostly separated by big spaces; when you’re alone in a big space creativity reaffirms personal narrative.

Wyoming Fiber Trails is “a treasure trove of individuals who do everything from horsehair hitching to rug braiding, spinning, felting, dolls, horse gear, leather work and a host of unusual activities,” says founder Sue Blakely. Blakely and her partners are chronicling fiber artisans around the state; each artisan, gallery and shop they uncover possess distinct Wyoming voices manifested in fiber.

“How many people knew we had a yak farm in Wyoming and that they had gathered yak fiber and had it commercially spun last year? ” asks Blakely. “A lot of us know about the sheep ranchers, even llama, alpaca and buffalo. But not yak!”

Renee Brown "Azure Lichenite Sun Cluster, Margaretite"

Renee Brown “Azure Lichenite Sun Cluster, Margaretite”

Two new Art Association exhibitions open this week. “Rendezvous: Ceramics Contemporary Invitational” and “Printegrated” share an opening reception at the Art Association on Friday, October 25th, 5:30-7:30 pm.  Both shows remain on exhibit through November 29th, 2013.

Ceramicist Sam Dowd is co-curator for “Ceramics Contemporary,” along with University of Montana associate professor Trey Hill. The show hones in on the themes of utilitarian and sculptural ceramics, and is comprised of selected works from around the country. Hill and Dowd will give a talk on November 22nd, 5:30 – 6:30 pm, at the Art Association Gallery, and a clay demonstration on Saturday, November 23rd, 10am – 5pm in the Art Association’s Clay Studio.

For information, email sam@artassociation.org, or phone 307.733.6379.

“Printegrated,” says the Art Association, “is a local survey of artists making handmade 2-D print work. Pieces include: block prints, lithographs, screen prints, intaglio, posters, books, zines and other printed ephemera.”  Contact Thomas Macker, Art Association Gallery Director, at thomas@artassociation.org, or phone (310) 428.4860 for info.  www.artassociation.org 

 Stephen Wolochowicz "Dots Inflation: Orange Over Lime"

Stephen Wolochowicz “Dots Inflation: Orange Over Lime”