Category Archives: Conservation

View22 is 36! Tiny Preview, Jackson Hole Art Auction

Lee Riddell's "View 22: Open Studio Art" painting, "Summer Sky, R Park."

Lee Riddell’s “View 22: Open Studio Art” painting, “Summer Sky, R Park.”

“I love being a part of the View22 project – where the creation of art is both inspired by and contributes to the protection of wildlife habitat and open space for all to enjoy. As a landscape painter, being out on these properties emphasizes for me the importance of preserving these lands forever.” ~ View22 artist Lee Riddell

Since it’s inception, “View22,” an arts-inspired fundraiser for the Jackson Hole Land Trust, has been wildly successful. This is the second year local artists create works, sharing their own experiences outside, “open studio” style, at dedicated Land Trust locations to celebrate the organization’s 36th anniversary.

Bronwyn Minton, for "View22"

Bronwyn Minton, for “View22”

Green flags marking “open studio” locations are up now through August 14th. Locations include  the Hardeman Barn, Hardeman North, Wilson Centennial Ponds, Wilson Wetlands Trail, R Park, Emily’s Pond, Spring Creek Ranch, Rock Springs at JHMR, Karns Meadow, Flat Creek Corridor, South Park Service Center, Hatchet Meadows, and the Indian Springs Swan Ponds. Look for these flags, and you’ll find View22 artists at work, and waiting to talk to any and all visitors about the heart-thumping experience of painting on conservation land. 

Ben Roth's artwork is inspired by Spring Creek Ranch landscape.

Ben Roth’s artwork is inspired by Spring Creek Ranch landscape.

The project concludes with an exhibit and sale at the Land Trust’s 36th Annual Picnic on August 14th, 4-8:00 pm at Fish Creek Ranch in Wilson, WY. Families are welcome, music will play! Tickets are $50 for adults; kids 12 and under are free.

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Plein Air for the Park ~ 2016!

 

Celebrate the Centennial! Visit "Plein Air for the Park" artists and shows!

Celebrate the Centennial! Visit “Plein Air for the Park” artists and shows!

It’s wondrous. “Plein Air for the Park is wondrous. A natural branching off from the roots of our precious national parks, “Plein Air for the Park” brings Grand Teton National Park to the world, just as the first explorers and chroniclers of the great Western Landscape did over 120 years ago. “Plein Air for the Park” has long been the summer arts event that most touches my heart. It’s fun for everyone, no matter your age, your artistic inclinations, no matter what you may or may not know about our parks.

One of Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painter Wes Newton's Teton-themed works.

One of Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painter Wes Newton’s Teton-themed works.

“The arts and nature cannot survive without one another.” ~ Yours Truly

Now in its fifth year, “Plein Air for the Park” attracts approximately 40 exceptional, professional painters to the park. Here, they spend the better part of two weeks spread out across the valley, painting our great natural wonders through their own eyes; interpreting what they see and feel. Then they put it on canvas. It all culminates in a grand SHOW & SALE at the Craig Thomas Discovery Center in Moose, Wyoming. Sale proceeds support the Grand Teton Association, a non-profit organization spreading the Park’s good word through literature, art, maps, posters, interpretive products, toys and learning games for children.

An early "Plein Air for the Park" painting by John Hughes.

An early “Plein Air for the Park” painting by John Hughes.

RMPAP, the Grand Teton Association, and Grand Teton National Park are proud to present this exclusive “wet painting” show and sale, now in its fifth year and a cornerstone of the Park’s summer season. Participating artists will paint on-location, “en plein-air,” in the Park and Jackson Hole area beginning July 4th (yes, it’s way past July 4th!)  The Show and Sale officially opens at Craig Thomas on Wednesday, July 13th.

39% of the proceeds from the show will benefit the Grand Teton Association and support their ongoing educational, interpretive, and scientific programs in GTNP.

Here’s an easy-to-follow schedule of events. Print it out, and paste it on your calendar!

JULY 4-12: Artists paint in and around Grand Teton NP and Jackson Hole. You may find them anywhere as you hike, fish, ride or float in the Park.

A painter's tools. Photo courtesy of "Artists in the Environment"

A painter’s tools. Photo courtesy of “Artists in the Environment”

SATURDAY, JULY 9: “Artists in the Environment” joins “Plein Air for the Park” in a group painting exhibition at String Lake, 9am – 12 Noon. Look for signage pointing the way. RMPAP artists Carol Swinney, Walter Porter and Jim Wodark will be on hand, and the public is welcome ~~encouraged! ~~ to stop by and bring a chair to watch. Bring your own art supplies and do your own sketches; children love painting alongside these talented landscape painters. A few years ago, several Park visitors made their own paintings on the spot and took them home. (Heart emoji!!)  Sponsored by the Grand Teton Association, this event is free and open to the public!

MONDAY, JULY 11: “Painting on the Mountain,” 5-7 PM at the Top of the Bridger Gondola/Couloir Restaurant, Teton Village. YES! That’s right. They’re painting high up on the slopes. Artists will demonstrate their painting techniques and skills and be available to answer questions about their work and the show.

TUESDAY, JULY 12: “Painting on the Square,” 3:30-6:30 PM, downtown Jackson. Join artists as they set up their easels and demonstrate in the heart of Jackson, on Jackson Town Square.

My Mom bought a painting!

My Mom bought a painting!

WEDNESDAY, JULY 13: Today is the Day!  Gala Opening Reception and Sale, 7-9:00 pm, at the Craig Thomas Discovery Center in Moose, Wyoming. All artists will be in attendance. Works are hung gallery-style, refreshments are in abundance, and energy high. It’s a fabulous party, and it’s FREE and OPEN to the Public. 

Very important and meaningful to those who knew and loved Greg McHuron, one of our greatest and most devoted plein air painters: The reception will also serve as the release party for Susan Hallsten McGarry’s new book about RMPAP member Greg McHuron, Gregory I. McHuron – Plein Air Master & Mentor. This beautiful new volume chronicles Greg’s life and work, and may be pre-ordered for the first time, exclusively at Plein Air for the Park.

Visitors throng to "Plein Air for the Park's" Quick Draw.

Visitors throng to “Plein Air for the Park’s” Quick Draw.

SATURDAY, JULY 16: The Show & Sale is a hard act to follow, but follow it we do! Come to the artists’ “Quick Draw” event, also at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitors Center, for a fixed-price sale of painted-on-the-spot works by RMPAP artists. The painting takes place 9-11:00 am, and is followed by a chance to buy works from the artists from 11:00 am – 12:00 Noon.

SUNDAY, JULY 17: The Show & Sale concludes at 4:00 pm. Want to know more about RMPAP and the Grand Teton Association? Visit www.rmpap.org and grand teton association

Painting in the Park~Courtesy Jackson Hole Art Blog

Painting in the Park~Courtesy Jackson Hole Art Blog

Enjoy! See you out there! Come early!  #jacksonhole #grandtetonnationalpark #pleinairforthepark #rockymountainpleinairpainters #jacksonholeartblog

 

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Tale of Bert and Two Tammies

Tammy Callens, "Bert."  Oil, 20" x 18"

Tammy Callens, “Bert.” Oil, 20″ x 18″

Last summer artist Tammy Callens and I went to visit Bert Raynes. I’d posted an image of Bert on Facebook. Bert, a distinctive bird, caught Callens’ eye. Callens paints portraits, and minutes after spying Bert on my Facebook page she contacted me to find out who this extraordinary man might be.

Callens wanted to paint Bert’s portrait.

“Brilliant,” I thought. Why hadn’t I come up with this? Callens and Bert had never met, but as soon as she expressed interest, my mind leapt at the possibilities. Of all Jackson’s special citizens, who was more deserving of a Callens portrait? Nobody. A “Bert” portrait might raise excellent funds for his beloved non-profit, The Meg and Bert Raynes Foundation.

A year later Callens’ portrait is complete. It’s a stunner. And it’s up for sale as of Friday, June 26th, at Mountain Trails Gallery in Jackson. An opening reception takes place Saturday, June 27th, 4-6:00 pm at the gallery. Callens is donating a significant portion of “Bert” sales proceeds to his foundation. The exhibition, entitled “Soliloquy,” remains on display through July 2nd. 

“The sad thing is, it looks like me,” says Raynes.

Boy, does it. Witty self-deprecation is pure Bert. In fact, he couldn’t be more thrilled. Callens’ spot-on portrait captures Bert as he was the day they met~~handsome in his signature red sweater and suspenders, Bert posed for Callens. Within minutes she’d sketched a lively impression and began playing with color.

“I love painting Bert as he was exactly on the day we met,” Callens recalls. “His life, compassion, knowledge and contributions extend far beyond those of most folks; most of us can’t imagine doing a fraction of his work. I felt his energy immediately and fell completely in love.”

Tammy Callens. "Foghorn Leghorn," Oil.  8 "X 14" Oil

Tammy Callens. “Foghorn Leghorn,” Oil.
8 “X 14”
Oil

Callens’ portrait depicts Bert surrounded with jars, bowls and bottles; symbols of a wellness campaign. Birds, Bert’s life’s work and extended family, are present too. Most importantly, the painting IS Bert. Any “F.O.B.,” (Friend of Bert) sees this immediately. When we’re with Bert, intelligence and sparky conversation are impressed upon us. We learn. He listens. We have a democratic, lifetime experience.

Want to be an F.O.B.? Make a beeline for Mountain Trails Gallery. Get there first. Be the “Bert” buyer. Be the first Jackson Hole “nature mapping” citizen to contribute to Bert’s foundation. Be the first person, as far as I know, to support a worthy cause by bringing home a portrait of a most distinguished bird. www.tammycallens.com , www.mtntrails.net  https://www.facebook.com/JacksonHoleActivities

 

 

A Wildlife Art “Staycation” & Big Strategic Plans

 

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Vacation, all I ever wanted; Vacation, have to get away~~Love that song, but I can’t find a video of Belinda Carlisle actually sounding GOOD singing that song. Hmm.

“Staycation!” If you’re having one of those, and Hill Climb vroom-vroom reverberates endlessly in your brain, escape. The National Museum of Wildlife Art is a nice place to visit. Friends and I recently enjoyed a terrific gallery talk on art’s “conservation” timeline. How did artists understand the concept of conservation in Darwin’s era, and how do they understand it now? You may be up on the subject, but listening to an excellent talk on the works comprising “Darwin’s Legacy,” all the way to Carl Rungius work and provided fresh knowledge.

Image from January, 2014's NMWA "Mix'd Media" Event

Image from January, 2014’s NMWA “Mix’d Media” Event

One woman, well versed on the topics of wildlife migration, habitat and wildlife art history, kept interrupting our guide. Without bothering to raise her hand she repeatedly cut into the lecture. DON’T do that, people! Despite her static, we thoroughly enjoyed the talk, which was simultaneously informal and informative.

The museum’s next “First Sunday” event takes place April 6, 11am – 5pm. Entry is free, and the public can “can step outside their everyday experience,” watch wildlife-themed films and explore the galleries.

“With exhibitions displaying larger than life depictions of lions, tigers and cheetahs, and films that include cougar tracking in Jackson’s own Tetons backyard, our April ‘First Sundays’ program offers a sort of exotic getaway right here in Jackson Hole,” says Director of Programming and Exhibitions Becky Kimmel. “Films on view include “North America: Born to be Wild,” a journey through some of the exotic wildlife at large in North American backyards; “American Cougar,”  taking a look at Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project and “Animal Odd Couples.”  The latter film delves into entertaining and affecting cross-species relationships. Films are shown courtesy of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. 

The night we visited, we witnessed at least 50 deer grazing the museum’s dusty, windblown bluffs. Miraculous!  www.wildlifeart.org

Robert Batema -Rocky Wilderness Cougar - Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

Robert Bateman – Rocky Wilderness Cougar – Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

The National Museum of Wildlife Art has issued a statement regarding the institution’s adopted strategic plan. Details should be available in a few months, but for now you can plan on the museum continuing to work to build financial stability and a strong endowment, further develop its permanent collection and create high-quality visitor experiences.

Perhaps most interestingly, a reallocation of building space will occur. “Trustees, staff and volunteers have engaged in several planning exercises to address particular elements of the strategic plan, and the Museum has engaged architects and other planning and programming professionals to determine the feasibility of particular elements,” says the museum. “The Board of Trustees will discuss all the current components of the strategic plan at their forthcoming retreat and board meeting in May.”

 

 

“Conservation Gallery”; Pipe Up on Public Art; Global Photography at Intencions

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Some press materials are simply so perfect and complete, it’s hard to up their message. That’s the case today! Here’s some information on the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s new exhibition, “Conservation Gallery,” which explores conservation themes by comparing and contrasting those themes as explored through artwork created from the 1800’s to today. The show opened November 16th, and will remain on display through April 13, 2014.

“American wildlife artists have helped to capture the positive and negative results of humanity’s interactions with wildlife still found today, as well as those that are simply a memory. In some instances, paintings and illustrations are the only record of certain species that we have,” says the museum’s Petersen Curator of Art and Research Adam Duncan Harris. Harris notes that artists’ interpretations of wildlife run the gamut from that of early American artist William Jacob Hays, who, says Harris, depicted the animals he saw on exploratory expeditions to the American West, visually preserving them for future generations—-to more conscious conservation messages, such as Steve Kestrel’s “Silent Messenger” (2005), that, in the artist’s own words, “mourn[s] the destruction and degradation of ecosystems worldwide and the tragic loss of unique animal species.”

Steve Kestrel - Silent Messenger - 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Steve Kestrel – Silent Messenger – 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Natural histories such as the rebound of bison populations lead to “tales of wildlife across the globe.” The tiger is well represented, and displays engage viewers with information that’s often revelatory. For instance, did you know that in the U.S. more tigers are currently owned by private individuals, not zoos, than exist in the wild? Approximately 5,000 tigers are in the U.S., according to the World Wildlife Foundation. 

“Artworks depicting endangered species, whether historical or contemporary, raise pointed questions about humanity’s role in species survival or extinction. We hope that Conservation Gallery will help spark some of those discussions with our visitors,” says Harris.

Images, top of page:  From “Conservation Gallery”: Wilhelm Kuhnert, Resting Tiger, 1912. JKM Collection©, National Museum of Wildlife Art (left), and Gwynn Murrill (United States, b. 1942), Tiger 2, 2012 -2013. Bronze. 42 x 62 x 31 inches. Dr. Lee W. Lenz, National Museum of Wildlife Art. © Gwynn Murrill (right)

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