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Posts from ‘Drawing’

Jul
14
Glenn Dean -"Rise"

Glenn Dean -”Rise”

New works by painters Glenn Dean, Jared Sanders and September Vhay will be on exhibition at Altamira Fine Art July 15-27, with an opening reception for all three artists on Thursday, July 18, 5-8:00 pm. Each artist brings renewed vision of their respective muses: for Dean, it’s landscapes imbued with a Taos light; Sanders’ renowned paintings of barns and other farm structures continue to accumulate silent power; and Vhay’s horses, accompanied by large-scale renderings of bison, are ever-intriguing.

“When I approach the landscape I try to simplify what I’m seeing. I strive to reduce the noise and look for nice color harmonies as well as positive and negative shapes playing off each other,” says Glenn Dean.

That’s modesty talking—Dean is much more complex than his statement suggests. A relatively young artist (Dean is 31), he has devoted himself to unraveling the complexities of works by great masters he admires; Maynard Dixon and Edgar Payne in particular.  For Dean, Dixon and Payne “painted things the way they were meant to be painted, with a solid sense of form and broad strokes of clean, defining color.”

So, if you’re thinking like Maynard did, you approach landscape painting with spiritual reverence. And you are straightforward in your beliefs, as well as the task in front of you, which, says the artist, is humbling. Something hidden resides in each bit of landscape~~all artists interpret what they see in individual ways, but each personal endeavor brings its own revelation, translated to canvas.

A native Westerner, Dean is California born and now travels and lives in the Southwest. Mountains, deserts, and coastlines are his favorite locations, and within each painting Dean manages to both delineate full shapes and fill them with powerfully blended colors. We are transfixed. The big Western media and invational venues are focused on young Dean: he’s snagged Art and Antiques magazine’s first “Emerging Artist Award,” and won the grand prize AND “Artists’ Choice” awards at the Tucson-Sonoran Desert Museum Invitational.  Wow.

Jared Sanders - "Shelter"

Jared Sanders – “Shelter”

“While some landscape painters relish capturing cheery beach scenes or sun-dappled aspen trees, [Jared] Sanders is drawn to the moody intervals that separate the seasons—the times between fall and winter and between winter and spring when he perceives subtle dramas unfolding.” – Southwest Art

Sanders’ show, “A Spirit of Place,” may certainly be about separation of seasons and the softer side of “idyllic,” but what Sanders has become known for is his ability to render barns and rural structures like the kind he knew as a child in a variety of settings and with a mastery of geometric composition and color. His is art that, at first glance may seem ever-repeating. Look again. With each work Sanders designs in depth, punctuating his compositions with brilliantly placed patches of color. Each work is a soul, and each soul regards viewer.

Sanders’ large, flat, geometric areas of color allow him to introduce those elements of abstraction and design into his paintings.

Sanders is meditative and precise, and his paintings stop you in your tracks. Allowing a long, luxurious amount of time to “read” Sanders’ paintings reaps endless rewards. This show, featuring full landscapes as well as barns, do demonstrate his singular intimacy with nature. He is a careful draftsman, sketching from hundreds of photographs he takes himself, and transfering them—–transforming them—-into his still, contemplative works of soft browns, yellows and pitch-perfect reds.

September Vhay - "Chiefs of the Day"

September Vhay – “Chiefs of the Day”

“Horses, bison, coyotes and deer grace the canvases — and a guest appearance by a hummingbird.” 

September Vhay’s new show, “A Divine Pause,” spotlights “animals both delicate and sturdy,” says Altamira. Vhay’s approach to her work remains classic, with a sense of dimension so palpable it can only come from a highly developed spatial aptitude. Vhay’s architectural background is evident in every work.

“My challenge and subsequent reward,” explains Vhay, “is to reorder reality by distilling it to its essence.” The truth of each subject lies in its essence, and intrinsic in that is great truth, she believes. “It is,” she says, “a pleasure to seek out this essence and to share it with others.”

Altamira sells Vhay’s works almost as quickly as they arrive at the gallery. This time, mule deer and foals share space with bull bison and “regal” horses. In fact, many creatures of the valley are rendered: fox and coyote make peace with each other and defer to a lighter-than-air hummingbird. Vhay deeply explores composition, color, light and expression; her backgrounds are often blank, elevating each creature to a higher status, and allowing their essence to be the work’s sole focus.

I happened to be in the gallery the afternoon Vhay’s charcoal works “Chiefs of the Day” and “Chiefs of Night” arrived. Measuring 30 x 77″ they are monumental in size, and viewers feel these iconic animals’ presence, inhale prairie dust, catch the scent of the buffalos’ hides, feel their hot breath.

“Confidence, power and beauty are intrinsic to September Vhay’s artwork, notes fine art consultant Katherine E. Harrington. “September’s soft touch demonstrates a refined appreciation of her subject. To look at September’s Vhay artwork gives the mind a place to rest.”   www.altamiraart.com

Leonardo_WEB

Watercolor images of wildlife and landscape, as well as works with religious themes by painter Morten Solberg are now on exhibition at Astoria Fine Art.  This is a solo show, but you can meet the artist, who has been painting for decades, at an artist’s reception on Thursday, SEPTEMBER 18th, 5-8:00 pm.

Solberg’s painting “The Artist,” shown at left, appears to be Solberg’s reverent portrait of Leonardo da Vinci.  www.astoriafineart.com

 

Jan
31

Mark Nowlin - Landscape, Mixed Media on Paper

“These are all landscapes, I made them on the spot, off the highway, during my drive from Portland, Oregon to Jackson,” says Jackson Hole artist and purveyor of arts supplies Mark Nowlin. Last Sunday, Knowlin took his turn showing and creating art at the new Teton County Library, where—lest you live in a cave—you know that Filament Mind, the huge art installation by conceptual artist Brian Brush has just been completed.

Under the filament tent, a fine cross-section of Jackson’s local artists brought their work to the library. “Stumble on Art in the Afternoons” began by hosting Travis Walker, who blipped on his Facebook page that “the best art I’ve ever seen in Jackson is at the Teton County Library.” Catch any sass, Travis?  (I’m teasing…)

Nowlin, so well known in our arts community, is a great proponent of contemporary art. He owns and operates Master’s Studio, a Jackson arts supply and framing store.  His creativity and knowledge of art history, perspective on Jackson’s art scene and where it might be trending and the region’s arts influences, are topics you should talk to him about sometime.

Nowlin does not exhibit often, but he should. Each of his compositions I viewed last week were dynamic, swinging with motion, affected by place, and wholly recognizable even as they embraced abstraction. Nowlin lined up dozens of works, a visual diary of his travels.

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Jan
28

Pinedale is a Wyoming town working hard to infuse art into its veins; the movement is growing. A blooming flower, its seeds are sewn by local artists, Sue Sommers among them.

Her mural, seen here, is one of two completed in the past two years as part of Pinedale’s public art program. Sommers’ large-scale, whirling, arcing and bright painting, “Our Glittering World,”  will remain at its current site for two years.

Pinedale’s public art initiative, IN|SITE EX|SITE, hosts an artists reception on Friday, February 8th, 6:30-8:30 pm at the Sublette County Library. Artists contributing work to Pinedale’s community, also to be honored, include Bronwyn Minton, JB Bond, Kirsten and Palmer Klarén, and Sommers.

I asked Sommers about the world she was considering as she created her mural.

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Jan
15

Boreal Owl III 10 x 8" oil on gessoboard - L. C. Riddell

Support in kind; a new kind.

Jackson painter Lee Carlman Riddell is fascinated with birds; she’s been painting her signature hummingbird paintings for some time, and more recently began showing her paintings of owls. Carlman, long a close observer and protector of wildlife, transmits her feelings about her subjects tenderly and distinctly. She knows a creature’s anatomy, spirit and biology. Now, a favorite subject and a cause dear to the artist’s heart have merged in an exhibit of Carlman’s paintings of Boreal Owls at Wilson, Wyoming’s Teton Raptor Center.

“Years ago Roger Smith and Margaret Creel Smith cared for injured raptors in their back yard, and Ed (Riddell) and I helped them check around for frozen mice to keep the birds fed,” says the artist.

Roger Smith went on to rehabilitate injured birds of prey at Three Creek Ranch; he phoned the Riddells, inviting them to come see the two Boreals he planned on releasing. Smith had been nursing the birds back to health since they’d fallen from their downed aspen tree nest as small chicks. Lee sketched, while Ed photographed the birds. Now, Lee Riddell’s early drawings have inspired paintings of the owls. The paintings are for sale, and half of sale proceeds benefit the Raptor Center.

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Jan
10

 

“I like the semi-religious aspect of doing something devotional and with discipline. Because the root of discipline is “disciple.” If I’m practicing, this is a form of worship, and I have to have a disciple’s severity towards myself.” ~ Tad Anderson

Everybody can draw and paint, believes Laramie artist Tad Anderson. But the act of taking out a brush, chalk, or any instrument capable of rendering art doesn’t necessarily mean the art will be good.  When one undertakes learning to become an artist, one needs to be comfortable self-criticizing and understanding quality.

Even so, Anderson works to approach drawing with a sense of freedom, a willingness to “follow the course of a drawing.” Then the work of listening to your gut and “hearing” if what you’ve completed is good begins.

“Just as you do in climbing, and I am a climber,” says Anderson. He’s dedicated much of his life to climbing and says his friends are all climbers.

“I’m just kind of a wild man–that’s who I am. So I have to try to discipline myself to make anything happen,” Anderson explains. “I might follow my emotions to the point of extremity. I have to hold on to a certain discipline to maintain sanity or relevancy; otherwise I risk floating away, into the air. My friends are kind of a rag-tag group, but they are dedicated, heartfelt rock climbers. It’s what they do all the time, make new climbs and explore new territory. You’d never know they were climbers, in the Jackson sense, because they’ve got no fancy equipment and aren’t in magazines.”

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