Category Archives: Economy

2016 Jackson Hole Art Auction Results!

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960) Portrait,1929 oil on canvas 30 x 24 in Sold: $245,700

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960) Portrait,1929 oil on canvas 30 x 24 in Sold: $245,700

I’d certainly buy her if I could. Dean Cornwell’s (1892 -1960) beautiful portrait of a young woman surrounded by American Indian motifs and symbols stole my heart. This painting sold for $245,700. Her story is just one of the hundreds of successful art stories to emerge from 2016’s Jackson Hole Art Auction, which realized over $8,000,000 in sales earlier this month. As always, the auction took place at Jackson Hole’s Center for the Arts, in downtown Jackson, Wyoming, and is a partnership production of the Trailside and Gerald Peters galleries.

This is a quick post; my aim is to get you the sales information as quickly as possible!



Charles M. Russell (1864–1926)
Buffalo Hunting,1894
oil on canvas
20 1/8 x 24 in
Sold: $450,000

unnamed-3N.C. Wyeth (1882–1945)
He Rode Away, Following a Dim Trail Among the Sage, 1909
oil on canvas
38 x 25 in
Sold: $585,000

unnamed-4Maynard Dixon (1875–1946)
Cattle Drive, 1939
mixed media
49 x 36 1/2 in
Sold: $409,500

unnamed-5Walter Ufer (1876–1936)
oil on canvas
31 1/2 x 47 1/4 in
Sold: $374,400

John Clymer (1907–1989)
Moving Camp, 1972
oil on canvas
20 x 40 in
Sold: $380,250

unnamed-7John Clymer (1907–1989)
September, 1972
oil on board
15 x 30 in
Sold: $187,200

Martin Grelle (1954–Present)
Last Trail to Medicine Wheel, 2016
oil and acrylic on linen
40 x 48 in
Sold: $198,900


Friedrich Wilhelm Kuhnert (1865–1926)
Brüllende Löwen
oil on canvas
44 3/4 x 83 1/2 in
Sold: $280,800

marris 6-23 right, 6/23/16, 11:02 AM, 8C, 7704x10681 (0+0), 138%, gustafson less, 1/8 s, R69.1, G56.4, B81.5

Bonnie Marris (1951–Present)
Family Ties, 2016
oil on canvas
36 x 48 in
Sold: $140,400

View all of the Jackson Hole Art Auction’s 2016 sales results at! More local art news coming soon!

As Art and Seasons Turn

"The Connoisseur," by Norman Rockwell.

“The Connoisseur,” by Norman Rockwell. The work appears on American Art Review’s October cover.

Ahhh. It’s Fall. Lovely.

Soon I’ll be returning to Jackson, and for almost everyone this season is a time of reflection. It’s also a time of “buckling down to work” and transition.

When I’m not reading or writing about Jackson Hole’s art scene, I’m often reading about art in other corners of the world, and quite a bit about art across the country. This entry, I’d like to offer up a few stories that recently caught my eye.

The first concerns plein air painting, and a show about a collection of artists, now deceased, whose works were, in their time, considered excellent. But as their lives came to an end, so did their visibility as artists. The show is “Variations on a Theme: American Painters (1850-2000), opening next month at the Rockport Art Association and Museum in Rockport, Massachusetts.

“It is an unfortunate fact that unless an artist has a gallery or family to keep their name in the forefront of the art world, the bulk of their work can be lost in the mists of time,” writes Judith A. Curtis in the latest edition of “American Art Review.” 

Alexander Bower (1875-1952), Cottage on the River

Alexander Bower (1875-1952), Cottage on the River

This is not currently a big problem for Jackson artists~~(housing is another matter)~~a number of artists who didn’t have representation or were faced with a gallery scene refusing to show their work are now front and center. This is incredible, and perhaps because we, collectively, are the polar opposite of the small New England town’s plight, the article spoke to me.

The Rockport’s mission is to feature local painters who are not only considered excellent, but have been “the mainstay of the Association in its fledgling days.” To sum up Curtis’ point, the museum would never have survived without intense dedication, talent, and a consistent “forward momentum.” Until last year, when the Rockport mounted an all-women’s art show  and expanded its reach, the museum was unable to produce a show like “Variations.” In the article about the show (if you can find a hard copy~~I can’t find the article on line) you can read about a number of New England plein air painters who, despite their great talents and breadth of subjects, faded from view. It’s a touching look from a knowing and careful perspective.

Stanley George, proprietor, closing a gate decorated by Jessica Blowers at Stanley’s Pharmacy on Ludlow Street. Credit Santiago Mejia/The New York Times

Stanley George, proprietor, closing a gate decorated by Jessica Blowers at Stanley’s Pharmacy on Ludlow Street. Credit Santiago Mejia/The New York Times

Don’t hurt me, NYT! I loved this article. And I hope that we in Jackson Hole can figure out something like the Lower East Side’s “100 Gates Project.” 

Tamara Best wrote about a street art project that’s transforming a part of Manhattan’s dingy Lower East Side. Although we in Jackson don’t pull down metal doors when we close up for the day, we could paint some fabulous large-scale works and use them as promotion for our local artists. What about that idea for the Public Art Spot, the snaggly “banner” space that juts out over West Broadway? That needs upgrading, up-thinking. 

Or, we could place art on the streets themselves. And create/paint/build/light up huge arrows pointing to the Art Association! Once visitors arrive at the Art Association, they’d find so much affordable local art that they couldn’t help but bring some back home.

Our public art is fabulous, but I feel more thoughtful placement of work is possible. Let’s not crowd small spaces without offering a place to rest, without offering nature and true assimilation of place and object.

I’m in favor of making the Art Association more “public,” a retail operation that draws more tourism dollars. Tourists rarely, if ever, visit and we need a fresh audience. I’m in favor of another project I recently read about, and Jackson has already started: displaying local art, with prices, in every lodging location possible, AND add an artist studio space directly into the lodging structure itself. The artist is always in residence.

Read Best’s article HERE. 

sothebys7-28-16My mom gets newsletters from the Hollis Taggart Gallery in NYC. The gallery sends out an Art Market Report much like our Jackson Hole Real Estate Report. A summation of the latest report says that there has been a “rising tide” of gallery sales and an “ebb in momentum” for auction houses. People are consigning, not selling, in an erratic market. Feels safer, more control.

As the gallery went to press with their newsletter, the SEC reported a 65% reduction in Steve Cohen’s Sotheby’s stockAlmost immediately a Chinese insurer “China Guardian” bought up a 13.5% position in Sotheby’s. And now it’s Sotheby’s largest shareholder…….

“No doubt China Guardian was quietly buying Steve Cohen’s stock position!” exclaims the Report.

Invest in, support and love your local artists. We are a family. An Association.


Because I do not wish to finish on a “corporate” note, I offer some these observations on the passing of time and transition:

We will be more successful in all our endeavors if we can let go of the habit of running all the time, and take little pauses to relax and re-center ourselves. And we’ll also have a lot more joy in living.” ~Thich Nhat Hanh

“The only reason for time is so that everything doesn’t happen at once.” ~Albert Einstein

“Every breath we take, every step we make, can be filled with peace, joy and serenity.”~Thich Nhat Hanh

Get Your Art Up and OUT; Cayuse’s Centennial

Borbay and Friend

Borbay and Friend

What percentage of artists working in Jackson Hole have pierced their immediate circle of collectors and taken their art to a new level? Branding happens when you’ve “arrived,” and nobody is a brand before that leap. Jackson’s art market is one of the strongest in the nation, recognized primarily for its historical and contemporary Western Art.

What if you’re not a native Westerner? What if you’ve moved here looking for answers, searching for a supportive venue? Perhaps you’ve been here forever, respected and recognized. Still, the art world at large doesn’t quite know it, and you’re not a household name. You’re selling, but you want to sell more. No sugar daddies (or mommies) around, no private plane connections, no trust fund….Maybe you’re shy.

 Just as an improved diet and better sleep will elevate health… so too can artists empower themselves by embracing necessary entrepreneurial techniques. Competition between artists for collectors is unnecessary. ~ Borbay

Borbay and Friends to the resue!

On Friday, July 29th, 1:30 – 3:00 pm at the Art Association’s Gallery, Borbay, Ben Roth and Claudia Bueno will talk on the topic “How to Get Your Work Beyond Jackson Hole.” The session is free. Heck, I wish I could be there!


Claudia Bueno

Claudia Bueno

Continue reading

Leading the Art Association Way; Metal Work

Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.

Community Supported Art Info at Brew Pub; Wild Wednesdays; Yellow Tulips

rocket-launchA Community Supported Arts informational meeting takes place at the Snake River Brewery (Brew Pub!) on Tuesday, December 17th, 5:30 – 6:30 pm.

“Having launched the Community Supported Art program a couple of weeks ago with a call for artists, CSA Jackson Hole is hosting an informational meeting for artists to learn more about the project,” says CSA founder Alissa Davies.

Currently, says Davies, CSA Jackson Hole is looking for local artists of all disciplines to apply to the new and innovative program. Nine artists will be featured during the summer of 2014, with names being announced in January. The deadline for artists to apply is January 13, 2014.

CSA Jackson Hole is modeled on Community Supported Agriculture programs, programs that are gaining popularity everywhere, every year.

Courtesy Philadelphia Generosity

Courtesy Philadelphia Generosity

Selected artists will receive a commission to create 40 “shares,” and potential collectors may purchase a share. In return they receive crates of locally produced artwork at three “pick-up parties” next summer. Each shareholder receives one piece from each of the nine CSA artists over the course of the summer. Pick-up parties take place at various local venues and will be festive occasions— enjoy music, food, and the chance to meet that evening’s featured artists and their work. For more information, contact Alissa Davies at 307.690.4757 or

Sculpture by Kent Ullberg

Sculpture by Kent Ullberg

Remember Tapas Tuesdays?

Now there’s “Wild Wednesdays,” a day of the week to visit the National Museum of Wildlife Art, enjoy the museum’s fine art collection, sit down to delicious food served up by Rising Sage Café and hear a little music. Piano music, to be precise, performed by Francis Koerber. Shop the gift store, open until 7:00 pm. Doors are open 5:30 – 8:00 pm. Reservations are strongly suggested; call (307) 732-5434, and view the winter dinner schedule online at

Alex Katz - Yellow Tulips

Alex Katz – Yellow Tulips

On Friday, December 13th, the Tayloe Piggott Gallery opens its new show, an exhibition of works by Alex Katz. An opening reception takes place that evening, 5-8:00 pm, and the exhibition remains up through January 31, 2014.

Associated with the Pop Artists, Katz’s work blossomed once the artist began studying at Manhattan’s Cooper Union Art School. The rest is a long, successful, high-profile history: read Katz’s full bio here. Piggott is noted for her ability to corral internationally renowned artists and draw selections of their work to Jackson Hole.

I do love this bit, pulled from Katz’s bio:

“During his years at Cooper Union, Katz had been exposed primarily to modern art and was taught to paint from drawings. Skowhegan exposed him to painting from life, which would prove pivotal in his development as a painter and remains a staple of his practices today. Katz explains that Skowhegan’s plein air painting gave him ‘a reason to devote my life to painting.’ ”