Category Archives: Economy

Fresh Lots at J.H. Art Auction; A Kansas Art Tale

Edgar Payne, Navajo Scouting Party, 24×38″ Oil. Estimate: $400,000 – $600,000

Fresh to the art market: no matter how important an artist’s work, if passed around the auction circuit too often, its value tarnishes. Flip city. That’s why the 2017 Jackson Hole Art Auction   elation over works new to the market is understandable: six oils by American illustrator W.H.D. Koerner. The works come straight from a private collection “with direct descent from the artist.”

W.H.D. Koerner (1878–1938) Citizens of the Law (1931) oil on canvas, 30 x 36″  Estimate: $75,000–$125,000

Koerner works include “Citizens of the Law,” shown above, and “New Horizons,” a “classic pioneer scene.” Both works estimate at $75,000 – $125,000. Koerner’s “Fly Fishing,” “The Bullring,” “The Price of the Old Northwest,” and “Indian Territory Demand for Tribute” round out the Koerner lots. Together these works comprise a vivid and compelling profile of the characters, times, challenges and passions of the Old West.

Edgar Payne, Carl Rungius, Robert Bateman, Tucker Smith; you’ll find works by all these iconic Western artists on the Jackson Hole Art Auction website.   No matter where they set up their easels, countless contemporary artists list the great Edgar Payne as a significant influence in their own work. 

The Jackson Hole Art Auction caps Jackson’s annual Fall Arts Festival, and is a co-production of the Gerald Peters and Trailside Galleries. A phenomenal Western Art market success, this will be the auction’s 11th year offering the finest works by living and deceased masters. The auction, now a destination in itself, continues to invite fine art consignments. Once again, the auction takes place over the course of two consecutive days: September 15th and 16th, 2017, at the Center for the Arts in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. For information, contact Auction Coordinator Madison Webb, via Tel: 866-549-9278 | Fax: 307-732-1600 or at www.jacksonholeartauction.com.  

Now, a brief “return from vacation” note. If you read the New York Times  Arts Section, you may have seen March 25th’s article “Arts Without Funding? It Can Be Done, Kansas Says.” 

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Journalist Mitch Smith’s  article tells the story of Kansas’ Hays Arts Council. Its director, Brenda Meder, cuts corners wherever possible in order to save money and funnel cash into the arts. She scrubs the toilets, she makes the reception appetizers, she’s increased membership and organizes quarterly art walks “in the brick-paved downtown, where storefronts transform into makeshift galleries that draw hundreds of spectators from Hays and beyond.”

In Hays, support comes from Democrats and Republicans. It is, says one politically involved citizen, “part of our DNA here. And that’s hard to replicate in other communities.”

This is a story about a Midwest arts community making concessions, but their arts scene remains strong. It’s a great profile. And, man, look at this art! It’s fantastic! Read the story here.

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Well Done, “Wallpaper!”; Sanders and McCauley at Altamira-Scottsdale

Art by Travis Walker

After a long winter’s lull, Spring is around the corner. If you can’t feel it in the air, you can feel it in Jackson’s art scene. In the past two weeks, art happenings popped up like crocus in 50- degree weather!

Teton Art Lab’s “Wallpaper” show was extraordinary. The Lab’s combination gallery-and-artists’ work space packed up like sardines for the show, and by the time I arrived at least two-thirds of the art had sold.

You might as well call it “The Red Dot Show.”

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2016 Jackson Hole Art Auction Results!

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960) Portrait,1929 oil on canvas 30 x 24 in Sold: $245,700

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960) Portrait,1929 oil on canvas 30 x 24 in Sold: $245,700

I’d certainly buy her if I could. Dean Cornwell’s (1892 -1960) beautiful portrait of a young woman surrounded by American Indian motifs and symbols stole my heart. This painting sold for $245,700. Her story is just one of the hundreds of successful art stories to emerge from 2016’s Jackson Hole Art Auction, which realized over $8,000,000 in sales earlier this month. As always, the auction took place at Jackson Hole’s Center for the Arts, in downtown Jackson, Wyoming, and is a partnership production of the Trailside and Gerald Peters galleries.

This is a quick post; my aim is to get you the sales information as quickly as possible!

SALE HIGHLIGHTS: 

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Charles M. Russell (1864–1926)
Buffalo Hunting,1894
oil on canvas
20 1/8 x 24 in
Sold: $450,000

unnamed-3N.C. Wyeth (1882–1945)
He Rode Away, Following a Dim Trail Among the Sage, 1909
oil on canvas
38 x 25 in
Sold: $585,000

unnamed-4Maynard Dixon (1875–1946)
Cattle Drive, 1939
mixed media
49 x 36 1/2 in
Sold: $409,500

unnamed-5Walter Ufer (1876–1936)
October
oil on canvas
31 1/2 x 47 1/4 in
Sold: $374,400

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John Clymer (1907–1989)
Moving Camp, 1972
oil on canvas
20 x 40 in
Sold: $380,250

unnamed-7John Clymer (1907–1989)
September, 1972
oil on board
15 x 30 in
Sold: $187,200

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Martin Grelle (1954–Present)
Last Trail to Medicine Wheel, 2016
oil and acrylic on linen
40 x 48 in
Sold: $198,900

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Friedrich Wilhelm Kuhnert (1865–1926)
Brüllende Löwen
oil on canvas
44 3/4 x 83 1/2 in
Sold: $280,800

marris 6-23 right, 6/23/16, 11:02 AM, 8C, 7704x10681 (0+0), 138%, gustafson less, 1/8 s, R69.1, G56.4, B81.5

Bonnie Marris (1951–Present)
Family Ties, 2016
oil on canvas
36 x 48 in
Sold: $140,400

View all of the Jackson Hole Art Auction’s 2016 sales results at www.jacksonholeartauction.com! More local art news coming soon!

As Art and Seasons Turn

"The Connoisseur," by Norman Rockwell.

“The Connoisseur,” by Norman Rockwell. The work appears on American Art Review’s October cover.

Ahhh. It’s Fall. Lovely.

Soon I’ll be returning to Jackson, and for almost everyone this season is a time of reflection. It’s also a time of “buckling down to work” and transition.

When I’m not reading or writing about Jackson Hole’s art scene, I’m often reading about art in other corners of the world, and quite a bit about art across the country. This entry, I’d like to offer up a few stories that recently caught my eye.

The first concerns plein air painting, and a show about a collection of artists, now deceased, whose works were, in their time, considered excellent. But as their lives came to an end, so did their visibility as artists. The show is “Variations on a Theme: American Painters (1850-2000), opening next month at the Rockport Art Association and Museum in Rockport, Massachusetts.

“It is an unfortunate fact that unless an artist has a gallery or family to keep their name in the forefront of the art world, the bulk of their work can be lost in the mists of time,” writes Judith A. Curtis in the latest edition of “American Art Review.” 

Alexander Bower (1875-1952), Cottage on the River

Alexander Bower (1875-1952), Cottage on the River

This is not currently a big problem for Jackson artists~~(housing is another matter)~~a number of artists who didn’t have representation or were faced with a gallery scene refusing to show their work are now front and center. This is incredible, and perhaps because we, collectively, are the polar opposite of the small New England town’s plight, the article spoke to me.

The Rockport’s mission is to feature local painters who are not only considered excellent, but have been “the mainstay of the Association in its fledgling days.” To sum up Curtis’ point, the museum would never have survived without intense dedication, talent, and a consistent “forward momentum.” Until last year, when the Rockport mounted an all-women’s art show  and expanded its reach, the museum was unable to produce a show like “Variations.” In the article about the show (if you can find a hard copy~~I can’t find the article on line) you can read about a number of New England plein air painters who, despite their great talents and breadth of subjects, faded from view. It’s a touching look from a knowing and careful perspective.

Stanley George, proprietor, closing a gate decorated by Jessica Blowers at Stanley’s Pharmacy on Ludlow Street. Credit Santiago Mejia/The New York Times

Stanley George, proprietor, closing a gate decorated by Jessica Blowers at Stanley’s Pharmacy on Ludlow Street. Credit Santiago Mejia/The New York Times

Don’t hurt me, NYT! I loved this article. And I hope that we in Jackson Hole can figure out something like the Lower East Side’s “100 Gates Project.” 

Tamara Best wrote about a street art project that’s transforming a part of Manhattan’s dingy Lower East Side. Although we in Jackson don’t pull down metal doors when we close up for the day, we could paint some fabulous large-scale works and use them as promotion for our local artists. What about that idea for the Public Art Spot, the snaggly “banner” space that juts out over West Broadway? That needs upgrading, up-thinking. 

Or, we could place art on the streets themselves. And create/paint/build/light up huge arrows pointing to the Art Association! Once visitors arrive at the Art Association, they’d find so much affordable local art that they couldn’t help but bring some back home.

Our public art is fabulous, but I feel more thoughtful placement of work is possible. Let’s not crowd small spaces without offering a place to rest, without offering nature and true assimilation of place and object.

I’m in favor of making the Art Association more “public,” a retail operation that draws more tourism dollars. Tourists rarely, if ever, visit and we need a fresh audience. I’m in favor of another project I recently read about, and Jackson has already started: displaying local art, with prices, in every lodging location possible, AND add an artist studio space directly into the lodging structure itself. The artist is always in residence.

Read Best’s article HERE. 

sothebys7-28-16My mom gets newsletters from the Hollis Taggart Gallery in NYC. The gallery sends out an Art Market Report much like our Jackson Hole Real Estate Report. A summation of the latest report says that there has been a “rising tide” of gallery sales and an “ebb in momentum” for auction houses. People are consigning, not selling, in an erratic market. Feels safer, more control.

As the gallery went to press with their newsletter, the SEC reported a 65% reduction in Steve Cohen’s Sotheby’s stockAlmost immediately a Chinese insurer “China Guardian” bought up a 13.5% position in Sotheby’s. And now it’s Sotheby’s largest shareholder…….

“No doubt China Guardian was quietly buying Steve Cohen’s stock position!” exclaims the Report.

Invest in, support and love your local artists. We are a family. An Association.

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Because I do not wish to finish on a “corporate” note, I offer some these observations on the passing of time and transition:

We will be more successful in all our endeavors if we can let go of the habit of running all the time, and take little pauses to relax and re-center ourselves. And we’ll also have a lot more joy in living.” ~Thich Nhat Hanh

“The only reason for time is so that everything doesn’t happen at once.” ~Albert Einstein

“Every breath we take, every step we make, can be filled with peace, joy and serenity.”~Thich Nhat Hanh

Get Your Art Up and OUT; Cayuse’s Centennial

Borbay and Friend

Borbay and Friend

What percentage of artists working in Jackson Hole have pierced their immediate circle of collectors and taken their art to a new level? Branding happens when you’ve “arrived,” and nobody is a brand before that leap. Jackson’s art market is one of the strongest in the nation, recognized primarily for its historical and contemporary Western Art.

What if you’re not a native Westerner? What if you’ve moved here looking for answers, searching for a supportive venue? Perhaps you’ve been here forever, respected and recognized. Still, the art world at large doesn’t quite know it, and you’re not a household name. You’re selling, but you want to sell more. No sugar daddies (or mommies) around, no private plane connections, no trust fund….Maybe you’re shy.

 Just as an improved diet and better sleep will elevate health… so too can artists empower themselves by embracing necessary entrepreneurial techniques. Competition between artists for collectors is unnecessary. ~ Borbay

Borbay and Friends to the resue!

On Friday, July 29th, 1:30 – 3:00 pm at the Art Association’s Gallery, Borbay, Ben Roth and Claudia Bueno will talk on the topic “How to Get Your Work Beyond Jackson Hole.” The session is free. Heck, I wish I could be there!

 

Claudia Bueno

Claudia Bueno

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