Category Archives: Fine Art

Our Majestic Parks: Ziemienski at Altamira Fine Art

Dennis Ziemienski, Stone Bridge Over the Merced, Yosemite National Park. Oil on Canvas 40 x 30 "

Dennis Ziemienski, Stone Bridge Over the Merced, Yosemite National Park. Oil on Canvas. 40×30″

In Dennis Ziemienski’s new show “Celebrating Our National Parks” at Altamira Fine Art, our parks are monumental. Man’s presence, for the most part, is small and humbling. In every image, you’ll find homage and acknowledgement that they, the parks, were here before us; and they, not us, are Earth’s great achievements.

DENNIS ZIEMIENSKI: CELEBRATING OUR NATIONAL PARKS, is on exhibit at Altamira Fine Art in Jackson, Wyoming, August 15-27, with an opening reception on Thursday, August 18, 5-8:00 pm. 

Dennis Ziemienski Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone National Park Oil on Canvas 48 x 30 inches

Dennis Ziemienski
Old Faithful Geyser, Yellowstone National Park
Oil on Canvas
48 x 30 “

As I write, 11 works from the show are posted on Altamira’s website; two have already sold. Ziemienski’s painting has always been marked by an appreciation of all things vintage. At times I’ve felt his work can be a little too obvious, but in this show, being obvious about color, scale and our precious parks is the point. These are spectacular tributes to some of America’s greatest treasures: Yellowstone, Grand Teton National Park, Arches National Park, Glacier , Yosemite and Devil’s Tower National Monument. This year is the National Park Centennial, and if you are one of the millions whose lives are deeply affected by personal park experience; if these wild and gorgeous places have made their mark on your soul, then you are bound to be transported by this tremendous exhibit.

Works reflect National Parks grandeur and scale. Ziemienski’s smallest painting measures 18 x 24″, and the largest canvas is 36 x 48″.

“The stunning beauty, history and wildlife provides an unlimited source of inspiration and subject matter for my paintings.” ~ Dennis Ziemienski

Growing up near Yosemite, I spent many summers there. Two decades ago I moved to Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park; stepping off the plane here for the first time my pulse quickened, stunned by the Tetons’ visual impact. Those halcyon summer months spent at Yosemite’s lakes, beneath the waterfalls, hiking valleys, camping in the pines~~I can smell it. I thought I’d lost that sense memory forever. Thank goodness, I was wrong.

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Turner Lightens Up at Trio Fine Art; Trailside’s Western Spirit

2016 Light on the Land

Kathryn Mapes Turner, "Grace," 40 x 30" oil on linen.

Kathryn Mapes Turner, “Grace,” 40 x 30″ oil on linen.

“I believe that humans can learn from the example set by animals to live sustainably on the planet. In this way, they live life ‘light on the land.’” ~ Kathryn M. Turner 

Transluscent light plays a big role in the artist’s upcoming exhibition “Light on the Land,” going on exhibit August 17th at Trio Fine Art, in Jackson, Wyoming. An opening reception will be be held August 18th, 5-8:00 pm at the gallery.

Plein air painter Kathryn Mapes Turner’s work has taken on a sheer, misty quality. Subject matter is not quite attached to this earth. It floats. Turner wields her brush to create an airy, misty atmosphere, quite in contrast to this region’s massive solidity and sheer tonnage.

It’s a style of painting the artist has embraced for some time. Often, Turner’s brushstrokes are diluted, and canvas texture becomes part of a painting; oils are so sparingly used they can be mistaken for watercolors.

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Seeing Double at Tayloe Piggott Gallery: Travagli & Katz

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image, a work from “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall” at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery.

Recalculating! What is reality? Who am I?

You’ll have to wait for the new show at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery to find out. “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall,” a group of works by Italian artist Patrizio Travagli, is so new that, with the exception of the work shown above, it hasn’t yet been photographed. The exhibit runs  August 16 – September 30th. Join the gallery for an opening reception on Tuesday, August 16th, 6-8:00 pm.

“My intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite.” ~  Patrizio Travagli

This may be the ultimate selfie moment. Travagli is fascinated by light’s power to shift perception. You will become part of this exhibit~~your reflection in any of six large mirrors, each with their own reflective and color properties, change and shift and with you, the viewer.

From "In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini - Florence | 2016"

From In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini – Florence | 2016″. Taken from a previous exhibition in Italy; research on the artist and the descriptions of his upcoming show at Tayloe Piggott prompted me to share this photo example of an earlier Travagli project.

Travagli aims to lead viewers in rethinking their perception of space, regardless of a wide variety of techniques, such as painting, sculpting, video, photography and installation.

“I frequently collaborate with scientists and professionals of other fields, such as architects and designers, in order to achieve a complete result….my intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite,” says the artist.

“Stretch?” I hope those mirrors don’t make me look fat!

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

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Nature is That “Nameless Thing”

Jennifer Hoffman Gessler, Morning Glory. 8x10"

Jennifer Hoffman, Morning Glory. 8 x10″ Oil

“There is something beyond explanation when an artist is drawn to a subject,” writes Jackson Hole artist Jennifer Hoffman. “Maybe it’s a bit of light or some familiar memory that is stirred, or some emotion the scene recalls. I’ve heard other artists refer to it as a sense of mystery or magic. My desire to paint the landscape around us (or any subject) goes beyond just copying its visual qualities.”

“That Nameless Thing” is the title of Hoffman’s newest show at Trio Fine Art, located just north of the Town Square in Jackson, Wyoming. She took the title from the writings of the deceased artist Emily Carr, an artist working in the early 1900’s associated with Canada’s “Group of Seven.”  Carr’s book “Hundreds and Thousands: the journals of Emily Carr” is Hoffman’s source.

While a variety of subjects, sizes and mediums fill the show, Hoffman has one ultimate goal: “I hope to catch something of that ‘nameless thing’,” she says. Hoffman was recently quite successful at capturing nature~~her serene, mirror-like painting of Flat Creek won “Honorable Mention” at the recent “Plein Air for the Park” Show and Sale.

“I love the patterns, colors, and textures of the mineral deposits, the steam, the reflective quality of the water.  I love the abstractness of the forms.” ~ Jennifer Hoffman

Jennifer Hoffman, "From Within." 12 x 16" Oil Pastel

Jennifer Hoffman, “From Within.” 12 x 16″ Oil Pastel

I’ve followed Hoffman closely over the years, and over those years she has consistently demonstrated her great gift for delving ever deeper into a scene. She is able to “translate” a landscape, wild creatures and still lifes into surprising, yet evocative works of art. Her draftsmanship is nothing short of impeccable, but she’s able to keep us from thinking of composition in its most basic terms because we are carried away by the poetry in her paintings.  One 30 x 30″ pastel of a thawing Hoback River is Hoffman’s largest pastel work to date.

Jennifer Hoffman at work.

The artist at Flat Creek

I’d go so far as to say Hoffman is channeling a bit of Abstract Expressionism. Helen Frankenthaler, are you in the air?

Yellowstone’s thermal areas are obviously beautiful.  Of course they draw many, many visitors because of their drama and unique physicality,” Hoffman observes. “I love the patterns, colors, and textures of the mineral deposits, the steam, the reflective quality of the water.  I love the abstraction of form.”

Jennifer Hoffman, "Transition," 16 x 20" Pastel

Jennifer Hoffman, “Transition,” 16 x 20″ Pastel

In this show you’ll find the fantastic, the sweet secrets of nature, a commanding use of color and light, and fall in love.

“That Nameless Thing” opens at Trio Fine Art on July 27th, and remains on exhibition through August 13th. An Opening Reception takes place Thursday, July 28th, 5-8:00 pm. Hoffman will give a talk at 6:00 pm. All work will be viewable online by July 25th. Visit www.triofineart.com ,  and contact the gallery at 307-734-4444. Email:   jen@jlholhoffmanfineart.com 

 

 

 

The Red Road: Valkyries and Medicine Men at Altamira Fine Art

R. Tom Gilleon, Valkyrie. Oil, 32 x 24 inches

R. Tom Gilleon, Valkyrie. Oil, 32 x 24″. At Altamira Fine Art.

Valkyries. Often portrayed as beneficent creatures, their role as the God Odin’s daughters (or female assistants) in Norse mythology is deciding which warriors die and which survive great battles. Those who perish are flown to Odin’s Valhalla by the valkyries, so that he may watch over them.

“Whether in their loving or bloodthirsty modalities, the valkyries are best understood as part of the extensive and dynamic complex of shamanism that permeates pre-Christian Germanic religion,” notes the web page Norse Mythology for Smart People.

R. Tom Gilleon’s “Valkyrie” elicits a tumbling mass of confliciting emotion. Is this a wise and beneficent angel of Odin or a bloodthirsty footman? Is she grounded or hovering? Is she watching over a particualar soldier or pensive? And how does this mythological Norse shaman legend translate to Native American symbols and culture?

How many battles were waged as white men overtook Indian lands, livelihood and very soul? Too many to count. Gilleon uses an ancient character to make a statement about today’s world crises, too many to count. But I choose to believe Gilleon’s valkyrie is a compassionate, helping spirit, ready to protect. Ready to carry our souls to safety.

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