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Posts from ‘Jackson Hole Art Galleries’

Apr
14
David Grossman - Blossoming Trees - Oil on Linen - 8x10"

David Grossman – Blossoming Trees – Oil on Linen – 8×10″

“No, I said: What kind of bird are YOU?” ~ Sam, to Suzy, upon their first meeting in the film “Moonrise Kingdom.”  

Contemplative, visual poems. Painterly, reminding me of a wistful Childe Hassam; contemporary, like a print; gentle, glowing and linear. Colorado painter David Grossman is one of three new artists signed on to Altamira Fine Art. Grossman is joined by contemporary artists David Michael Slonim and bold trendsetter Thom Ross.

Attribute it to the soft, indecisive changing of our alpine seasons, call it a love of landscape. My heart has been stolen by Grossman’s diminutive oil painting, shown above. He paints, says the gallery, “abstracted visions of forests…melodic in their focus on rhythm and symmetry.” Adds Fine Art Connoisseur: “[Grossman's paintings] effect the comfort and relief of a ‘visual exhale’ while also leading us into meditative contemplation and thought.”

A few brushstrokes and we are eras away in time, lost in a happy composition. 

Thom Ross - Gunman's Walk - Oil on Canvas 48 x 48"

Thom Ross – Gunman’s Walk – Oil on Canvas
48 x 48″

Have you been around Jackson long enough to remember California born artist Thom Ross’ installation at Snow King’s base? “Custer’s Last Stand” was an erected forest of early American soldiers pitted against Native Americans. We walked through and around the battle, and though that battle is one of the West’s most defining moments, Ross’ style is to portray iconic Americans and events in off-beat (gunmen with tiny heads!), sometimes complex and unexpected ways. He can be sensitive and elegiac; friends own an early Thom Ross painting depicting a solitary dead horse, lying on its side. It’s beautiful.

“Indians playing croquet; General Custer riding off while balancing a table on his head; Sheriff Pat Garrett standing with shotgun in hands bracing against the cold of a wintry New Mexico morning – these are a few of the unique images depicted in Ross’s paintings,” says Altamira. In addition to creating his art, Ross runs his own space, “Due West Gallery,” in Santa Fe.

David Michael Slonim - Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas-48 x 60"

David Michael Slonim – Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas- 48 x 60″

They are landscapes; landscapes deconstructed to layered, broad color fields, conveying essence. Contemporary painter David Michael Slonim is the third “new bird” to alight at Altamira. Plein air painting and illustration are part of his professional artistic experience.

Prisms, shards of translucent glass, collage — these I see in the artist’s expressionist works. Slonim is influenced by a bevy of masters, including Diebenkorn, Mitchell, Motherwell, de Kooning, and Cezanne.

“Although my paintings are derived from nature, they are really about color, shape, texture and line for their own sake,” says Slonim. “I started out as a plein air painter. The more I painted and studied, the more fascinated I became with abstraction. Now I am more interested in interpreting nature than representing nature.”  www.altamiraart.com 

Kyle Pozin - Mystic Warrior

Kyle Polzin – Mystic Warrior -Oil- 74 x 30″

In case you haven’t heard: April 5th’s Scottsdale Art Auction brought in $12.6 million.

Ecstatic press materials report that Frederic Remington’s “The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero,” an oil estimated between $500,000 – $700,000, sold for $920,000, the top sale of the day. Many deceased and contemporary masters did exceedingly well, but, emphasizes the auction:

“The crowd of almost 500 bidders was stunned when a 40-year-old artist from Texas, Kyle Polzin, took the block with a 74 x 30 inch oil entitled “Mystic Warrior.” Estimated up to $40,000, an extended bidding war ended in a hush, as auctioneer Jason Brooks carefully guided bids to a final total of $287,500.”

The Scottsdale Art Auction has now realized over $100,000,000 in art sales over the course of a decade. For complete results, visit www.scottsdaleartauction.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Feb
25

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A new arts venture is in town. Brush Art Ventures has opened softly over the past several months, but last week founder Alison Brush threw a big party. Brush’s new enterprise is housed in a Dynia “Metro Plateau” unit, perched above Broadway, near the intersection of that throughway and Highway 22.

Bonbon 12x6x4 1500 smBrush represents a handful of regional artists, exhibiting their works at 1085 West Broadway, Unit 1123. The concept is similar to that of apartment galleries popular in major arts cities like New York: Set up an exhibition in your own space and open it up to the public. Dynia’s dynamic structures, marked by high ceilings, industrial finishes and big windows are perfect for home/public gallery space.

At Brush’s recent opening for fledgling wildlife and landscape photographer Chuck Schneebeck and sculptor Amy Unfried, the place was packed. And the crowd was new. Schneebeck’s conservation work and Unfried’s connections to Jackson’s art world at large attracted sportsmen, collectors, fishing luminaries, artists, Mr. Dynia and a host of friends. Brush Art Ventures is, in fact, a gallery. Galleries have shows, and here’s hoping Ms. Brush keeps the energy going!  Check out her website: www.brushartventures.com, to see a list of represented artists. With the departure of Culture Front salons, a hole needs to be filled. Maybe it can be filled here?

Many thanks to Ms. Brush for supplying images for this post! I took a few shots; hers are better!

BAV_3_Feb 21_150

Brush happens to represent noted California artist Jeremy Morganwho opens a show Friday, Feb 28th, alongside 12 local artists, at the Art Association. Morgan will be there! Thomas Macker relays that the opening reception runs 5:30 – 7:30 pm, and will feature Morgan’s work and the work of  his dedicated students from years past. This year’s workshop, “Realism to Abstraction,” offers a fresh opportunity to study with a master right here in Jackson, says Macker. www.artassociation.org .

Jeremy Morgan - Lost Horizon

Jeremy Morgan – Lost Horizon

Robert Indiana - Love 1967 - Screenprint, 14 x 14"

Robert Indiana – Love
1967 – Screenprint, 14 x 14″

Lots of new work in at Heather James Fine Art’s Jackson gallery. Including this beauty, a classic, our generation’s big art flag: Robert Indiana’s “LOVE.”  The gallery is open this month, stop in and warm to the message!  www.heatherjames.com.

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Behind the eight ball, as they say.

In the weeks leading up to my recent getaway I was so busy putting the finishing touches on freelance assignments, writing this blog and preparing for the trip that I failed to notice Meg Daly’s news about resigning her Culture Front website and its related efforts. Her reasons for doing so are there for anyone to read on Culture Front’s blog, still live.

Daly provided fresh ways for our community to look at and think about art. So many of us vigorously participated in Culture Front’s salons at The Rose. When Daly was preparing to launch her site she had the grace to invite me to tea to talk about her vision. Many would have simply and bluntly launched, without bothering to communicate to me that a new local arts blog was on the horizon.

I won’t forget that, and I’ll miss the collaboration we shared.

Thank you, Meg. Where’s my heart emoticon?

Jan
06

Eye

Eye, yai yai~~~Happy New Year, Jackson!  It’s nice to see you again. Been visiting family and taking in the views offered up by rosy winter lake sunsets, frozen, wind-whipped pines, friends, the Yale Art Museum (try closing your eyes in there!), tasting good soul food—and now it’s time to catch up around here.

Today’s post is a warm-up, so I’ll list items from my “in box” that many of you may already know about. Or maybe, like me, you’ve been away. Here goes:

Altamira Fine Art is headed to the L.A. Art Show, 2014, January 15-19, 2014 Booth 240. Altamira artists “Billy” Schenck, Ed Mell (they got him!), R. Tom Gilleon, Glenn Dean, Rocky Hawkins and selected paintings from Fritz Scholder (1937-2005). Opening night party: 1/15/14, 8-11:00 pm.  www.altamiraart.com

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David Swift is artfully photographing high-octane performers swinging through the theater doors at the J.H.Center for the Arts. He is clearly enjoying himself! “Giddy” is the word I’d use. BTW, the New York Times recently ran a travel article on Jackson’s ski scene.  Paper edition photo captions were way off~~the scenes did not depict what the captions described, and the captions were out of order. Still, great coverage for J.H. A source tells me that story was in the NYT hopper last summer, and one special gallery they mentioned was Cayuse Western Americana. Good get. 

The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s next “Mix’d Media – Darwin’s Legacy” takes place at the museum on Thursday, January 9th, 6-9 pm. Additionally, Director of Education Jane Lavino has posted a new NMWA job opening – Part-Time Assistant Curator of Education. Check it out at   http://www.wildlifeart.org/about/employment/

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Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works — the first to be hosted by the Center for the Arts — at the Center Theater Gallery. An Exhibit Opening takes place on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. “Interiors/Exteriors” explores the artist’s two painting styles, both highly developed. The show remains up January 13-29th, 2013. Love the promotional image, it’s like a 60′s record cover –twist and shout! More on Kosharek’s show in our next post.

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Direct from Wyoming Arts (verbatim):  The Visual Arts Fellowship application is now open! Deadline: March 10. Applications will be accepted on CaFE only (www.callforentry.com). Visual artists of all kinds, including film and video, are invited to apply. More information available in the call on CaFE or at http://wyoarts.state.wy.us/wac-grant/fellowship-for-visual-artists/. Juror information in included on the webpage. Additionally, CLICK! is coming together! Save the date for April 4-5 in Fort Washakie/Lander. Information and registration will be available mid-January. Want to know more about Wyoming Visual Arts happenings? Sign up for their list serve:  http://www.openvistas.net/sign_up.html

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Some dude is publicly persistent in his queries about  J.H. Public Art  project press releases on our community list serve. Anyone know this guy? Whatever is going on there, I’ll include that arts non-profit’s new “call for entries” information in my next post, too.

For you at this New Year, Jackson, a tiny excerpt from “All the Hemispheres,” by Sufi Poet Hafiz: Leave the familiar for a while/Let your senses and bodies stretch out/Like a welcomed season/Onto the meadows and shores and hills./Open up the roof.

 

 

 

Dec
16
September Vhay - Red Horse 477

September Vhay – Red Horse 477

Think RED. 

Away to the galleries I flew like a flash,

Burst past reception, hit the floor in a dash.

The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow,

Reflected  September Vhay’s lustrous show;

When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,

Glistening canvas, crimson swirls and Red Horses so near…

“All the Red Horses,” a show of new paintings by Jackson artist September Vhay, opens at Altamira Fine Art December 16, 2013, and an opening reception takes place Thursday, December 19, 5-7:00 pm at the gallery; Vhay gives a talk at 6:00 pm. The exhibit remains up through New Year’s Day, 2014.

Vhay will discuss the origins of her Red Horses and creativity, but the gallery has provided a sneak peek as to what Vhay may touch upon. The series began several years ago as a way for Vhay to deepen her exploration of horses’ intrinsic qualities and forms, says Altamira. Initially these paintings, based on the study of sumi-e art and abstract sculptural work, were compact. Over time, and with the added luxury of larger exhibition space, Vhay’s minimalist, contemporary red horses began appearing in larger scale. Bordering on the abstract, Vhay’s images remain proportionally true. Large and small oils on canvas, as well as watercolors on paper, comprise the show. Red on White: Vhay’s serene gestural series evokes the distillation and essence of the equine form – and the West in wintertime.  www.altamiraart.com 

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Nov
21

Tigers.122124

Some press materials are simply so perfect and complete, it’s hard to up their message. That’s the case today! Here’s some information on the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s new exhibition, “Conservation Gallery,” which explores conservation themes by comparing and contrasting those themes as explored through artwork created from the 1800′s to today. The show opened November 16th, and will remain on display through April 13, 2014.

“American wildlife artists have helped to capture the positive and negative results of humanity’s interactions with wildlife still found today, as well as those that are simply a memory. In some instances, paintings and illustrations are the only record of certain species that we have,” says the museum’s Petersen Curator of Art and Research Adam Duncan Harris. Harris notes that artists’ interpretations of wildlife run the gamut from that of early American artist William Jacob Hays, who, says Harris, depicted the animals he saw on exploratory expeditions to the American West, visually preserving them for future generations—-to more conscious conservation messages, such as Steve Kestrel’s “Silent Messenger” (2005), that, in the artist’s own words, “mourn[s] the destruction and degradation of ecosystems worldwide and the tragic loss of unique animal species.”

Steve Kestrel - Silent Messenger - 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Steve Kestrel – Silent Messenger – 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Natural histories such as the rebound of bison populations lead to “tales of wildlife across the globe.” The tiger is well represented, and displays engage viewers with information that’s often revelatory. For instance, did you know that in the U.S. more tigers are currently owned by private individuals, not zoos, than exist in the wild? Approximately 5,000 tigers are in the U.S., according to the World Wildlife Foundation. 

“Artworks depicting endangered species, whether historical or contemporary, raise pointed questions about humanity’s role in species survival or extinction. We hope that Conservation Gallery will help spark some of those discussions with our visitors,” says Harris.

Images, top of page:  From “Conservation Gallery”: Wilhelm Kuhnert, Resting Tiger, 1912. JKM Collection©, National Museum of Wildlife Art (left), and Gwynn Murrill (United States, b. 1942), Tiger 2, 2012 -2013. Bronze. 42 x 62 x 31 inches. Dr. Lee W. Lenz, National Museum of Wildlife Art. © Gwynn Murrill (right)

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