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Posts from ‘Jackson Hole Visual Arts’

Aug
27

What is a portrait? A profile? Who are your friends, and who is “pending,” waiting to be connected with you? Perhaps you’ve issued invitations to “friend” people on Facebook and never received a response. For any number of reasons, you’ve not replied to requests with a click of the “Accept” button.

“Pending,” glass artist Charlotte Potter’s newest large scale installation at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, was created to celebrate the potential of new friendships via social media.

“I am interested in various levels of familiarity and intimacy that develop with online personas and associations.” ~ Charlotte Potter

“Historically,” says Potter, a “profile” portrait was quite literally a person’s silhouette, and often these would be hand-engraved as a glass cameo pendant. The modern profile (or portrait) [are Facebook profile pictures.]

As interactions have become more virtual, Potter’s goal with this project is to make connections physical once again. She’s created handmade objects~~cameos~~from public images on Facebook.

Potter collected profile pictures of pending “friend requests” from the spring of 2014 and hand-engraved a small glass cameo of each. Cataloguing meticulously, she arranged pendants geographically, according to individuals’ Facebook information. Each grouping protrudes from the wall in direct proportion to how many friends Potter shares with her “pendings.”

Charlotte Potter. Courtesy hamptonroads.com

Charlotte Potter. Courtesy hamptonroads.com

“I am interested in various levels of familiarity and intimacy that develop with online personas and associations. I hope for the piece to challenge audiences to reconceptualize relationships in the digital age and consider the different thresholds of friendship in our lives,” says the artist.

Potter goes on to say that pending friend requests are “in a certain kind of limbo, a liminal space between acceptance, knowing and memory.” For Potter, people exist in this space for many reasons; in her case, she includes distant family members, mutual friends, friends from early school days, colleagues, or people she simply can’t place.

My Profile, by Charlotte Potter

My Profile, by Charlotte Potter

 

“Maybe I have yet to meet you in person or have simply overlooked my notifications; some of you are now my dear friends, trusted colleauges, acquaintances, and some of you may still be ‘pending.’ I see this work as celebrating the potential of new relationships. I thank everyone whose profile is included in this project for your fortuitious participation.”

Learn more about Potter and the exhibit at www.charlottepotter.com 

Aug
18
Susan Vecsey Untitled (Yellow) Oil. 36x44"

Susan Vecsey Untitled (Yellow) Oil. 36×44″

 

“Susan Vecsey: A Selection of Paintings” opens at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery on August 20th. An opening reception will be held that evening, 6-8:00pm, and the show remains on display through October 10th, 2015.

American artist Susan Vecsey was born in 1971 (so young!) and during her (to we “boomers”) short time on earth she’s developed a gorgeous liquid painting style. In this show, only one painting I can recall contains hard color field delineations. A person could gaze at Vecsey’s work a long, peaceful while.

These works are the sort we used to see at Piggott’s Gallery on a regular basis, in its former life as the J.H. Muse Gallery. We’re back in the land of exciting color, color, color! Hooray!

Helen Frankenthaler immediately comes to mind. It turns out she’s on Vecsey’s mind, too.

Susan Vecsey "Study for Morning Light at Northwest Harbor, East Hampton. 2012" Oil on Paper, 11.5 x14.5"

Susan Vecsey “Study for Morning Light at Northwest Harbor, East Hampton. 2012″ Oil on Paper, 11.5 x 14.5”

 

“The reflection of the 1960s New York art movement of Color Field painting is very present in her work. In particular, the work of Helen Frankenthaler is a major influence and inspiration,” writes Piggott. “Color Field painters apply color in large one dimensional swaths across a large canvas, or ‘field’…. (Her) work takes a cue from “Lyrical Abstraction”, which situates abstraction in a landscape context. The allusion of landscape—hills, fields, horizon lines, seas and skies is suggested in the abstract form of her work.”

Susan Vecsey, Untitled (Pink) 2013, Oil on linen

Susan Vecsey, Untitled (Pink) 2013, Oil on linen

 

The works feel “large scale”~~however, Vescey’s paintings vary in size.

Richly pigmented, Vescey’s paintings emerge one at a time, “single file.” Interesting linen textures are allowed to emerge. And although her paintings are a compilation of small selections of color, Vecsey makes extreme effort to reach the intensity of color she wants.

Enchanting. We are thirsty for this level of work, and like a mirage it will disappear. Walk towards it. www.tayloepiggottgallery.com

Susan Vecsey, Untitled (Orange / Pink) 2014, Oil on linen

Susan Vecsey, Untitled (Orange / Pink) 2014, Oil on linen

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A very different kind of landscape show is on exhibit, beginning this week at Trio Fine Art. Please visit my author’s page, https://funthingstodoinjacksonhole.wordpress.com/2015/08/17/bill-sawczuks-big-country/  to read about Bill Sawczuk’s new show, “The Way I See It.”  

Aug
11
Jared Sanders, "Outpost." Oil on Canvas 60 x 60"

Jared Sanders, “Outpost.”
Oil on Canvas 60 x 60″

Every Jackson Hole arts patron knows the “twin” galleries at the south end of Center Street: Altamira Fine Art and Palm Desert’s Heather James Fine Art satellite space.

Now through August 22nd, one of Altamira’s most accomplished (and, may I say, most imitated) painters, Jared Sanders, is exhibiting his latest collection, “Chosen Road.”

Sanders long ago chose his road as an artist, his instincts precise. Precision marks every Sanders painting; although he is known to work out of doors, his compositions are exacting, considered from a mathematical point of view. And even as he avoids the plein air, dappled hillsides trend Sanders does paint native Western farm landscapes~~~“the moody intervals that separate the seasons–the times between fall and winter and spring when he perceives subtle dramas unfolding,” wrote Southwest Art.

Jared Sanders, "Veiled Hay." Oil on Canvas 40 x 40"  SOLD

Jared Sanders, “Veiled Hay.” Oil on Canvas
40 x 40″ SOLD

To these landscapes Sanders has added, in just a few works, blue draping. Stacked hay bales are partially or fully “dressed” in malleable, folding fabric, adding a surrealistic veil to Sanders’ “traditional” farming compositions. Viewers may wonder if they there simply to protect, or to keep a secret? Are we being given a peek at a the artist’s muse? www.altamiraart.com

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Heather James Fine Art in Jackson.

Heather James Fine Art in Jackson.

Heather James has dynamically re-set its space, and the reincarnation remains in place through this September.

The gallery is known for its exceptional secondary market collection; this season the gallery’s offerings on Center Street are heart-stopping. Heather James is the closest thing to a full-fledged contemporary, modern and post war museum in Jackson.

Heather James “continually pursues the best examples of important artists’ work across periods and movements, and this exhibition features a selection of recent acquisitions,” writes the gallery.

Russell Young. "Marilyn Crying Suicide."

Russell Young. “Marilyn Crying Suicide.”

“It’s a privilege for us to be stewards of these important works of art and present them to the community,” adds gallery director Colleen FitzGerald. “This museum-quality exhibition spans a variety of media and many movements, from Impressionism to Modernism to cutting-edge contemporary.”

In addition to its Warhols, Cassatts and Picassos, Heather James has added works by Robert Rauschenberg, Anish Kapoor, Sean Scully, Hassel Smith, Max Pellegrini, and William Wegman. www.heatherjames.com

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753

A tip of the Stetson and best wishes for a great Texas-sized future for Jim McNutt, departing National Museum of Wildlife Art CEO. A significant transition is in store for our museum, and Jim will be returning to Texas to join his family and pursue new opportunities. Good luck Jim, and Thank You!  

Jul
29
Todd Kosharek: "Provisions."

Todd Kosharek: “Provisions.”

“‘Provisions.’–Almost finished. Started it over two years ago. I love working on these large, long term paintings, life moving along as I paint them. So much gets absorbed into them.” ~ Todd Kosharek

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek is, as we speak, finishing up the last of two new pieces for his next solo show, “Folded: Symbol.” The exhibition opens August 1st at Daly Projects Gallery and is comprised, Kosharek shares, of ten new paintings exploring the symbolism of origami cranes as a symbol for Peace. The show remains up through the month.

“These paintings are the ones that explore the idea of Peace in various forms,” Kosharek writes. “Peace through principle, peace through expression, peace through practice – these are the titles of some of the paintings in the show. Some works explore these ideas as actual documents folded into cranes; some explore more abstractly. I’m also showing four of my latest portraits, including “Golden Boy,” my first portrait of (my son) Weston.”

Todd Kosharek - Peace Through Principle. 14x26"

Todd Kosharek – Peace Through Principle. 14×26″

Kosharek has been so busy researching, designing and painting he’s barely had time to photograph his work. A miraculous ability to balance daily family life — he is a new father — and paint to near perfection, not concerning himself with the length of time he puts into a work, is evident. One work, “Peace Through Practice – The Nobel Peace Prize” depicts origami cranes imprinted with the words of Alfred Nobel, Martin Luther King, Jimmy Carter, Gorbachev and the Dali Lama. All in their original handwriting.

“Provisions” is a masterpiece. It has the detailed mystery of a Zen garden; thousands of stories folded into one. A dining room set is at once anchored and weightless. Kosharek sets the scene by nesting rectangles inside of one another, each leading the eye to where it needs to go. Cranes rest at each place, and below the floor-table are more cranes, more “provisions.” What look like artist’s supplies are painted lower left~~a self-portrait? We’re looking inside Kosharek’s mind, his spirituality. Though this interior is dark, curtains part to reveal a bright, snowy scene. Against the window is a bare, dead tree. But beyond it is a lush forest of evergreens, a snowy white path to wherever Kosharek wants to travel. “Provisions” is at once mysterious, a bit prophetic and…peaceful. www.toddkosharek.com

Todd Kosharek. "Peace Through Transcendence. 10x16"

Todd Kosharek. “Peace Through Transcendence. 10×16”

Jul
27
Dennis Ziemienski-Wyoming Cowgirl. Oil on Canvas  60x40"

Dennis Ziemienski-Wyoming Cowgirl. Oil on Canvas 60×40″

Join painter Dennis Ziemienski at Altamira Fine Art for an opening reception and artist’s talk on on Ziemienski’s new show, “Visions of the New Old West,” on July 30th, 5:30-7:30 pm. The show remains on exhibit July 27-August 8.

As time passes, disputes over what is considered true Western art have volubly (in the sense of expanding lung capacity) lessened. We are, as this show’s title suggests, evolving yet again. Recently I attended a Yale University Art Gallery talk on Whistler’s etchings and their influence over artists of his age; conversely, Whistler was influenced by his peers. Put all these artists’ works together, and the effects are clear as day.

“Nothing is really ever new,” remarked the university’s etchings curator. “Everything springs from another era some way, somehow.”

Dennis Ziemienski, Wig Wam Nocturne Oil on Canvas 36 x 36 inches

Dennis Ziemienski,
Wig Wam Nocturne Oil on Canvas 36 x 36 inches

The West—our region, at any rate—was first discovered in part because of posters commissioned by railroad lines. These travel posters promoted new regions opening up to tourism and Ziemenski, a native San Franciscan, puts together idealistic images of cowboy life with a feel for sharp, witty modernism. His work melds love of traditional Western aesthetic and everything new the West has absorbed for decades.

How unlikely to think of Whistler’s work while considering Ziemenski’s; the former show included a nocturne, and Altamira’s includes Ziemienski’s “Wig Wam Nocturne,” shown above. It’s one of my favorites. See how the artist lines up his composition, playing the tipi’s inverted “V” against a parked car’s tailwing rear lights? Perfectly placed zig-zags (symbolizing mountains?) echo a line of violet sunset clouds. A lighted door beckons.  www.altamiraart.com.