Category Archives: Museums

Seeing Double at Tayloe Piggott Gallery: Travagli & Katz

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image, a work from “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall” at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery.

Recalculating! What is reality? Who am I?

You’ll have to wait for the new show at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery to find out. “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall,” a group of works by Italian artist Patrizio Travagli, is so new that, with the exception of the work shown above, it hasn’t yet been photographed. The exhibit runs  August 16 – September 30th. Join the gallery for an opening reception on Tuesday, August 16th, 6-8:00 pm.

“My intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite.” ~  Patrizio Travagli

This may be the ultimate selfie moment. Travagli is fascinated by light’s power to shift perception. You will become part of this exhibit~~your reflection in any of six large mirrors, each with their own reflective and color properties, change and shift and with you, the viewer.

From "In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini - Florence | 2016"

From In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini – Florence | 2016″. Taken from a previous exhibition in Italy; research on the artist and the descriptions of his upcoming show at Tayloe Piggott prompted me to share this photo example of an earlier Travagli project.

Travagli aims to lead viewers in rethinking their perception of space, regardless of a wide variety of techniques, such as painting, sculpting, video, photography and installation.

“I frequently collaborate with scientists and professionals of other fields, such as architects and designers, in order to achieve a complete result….my intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite,” says the artist.

“Stretch?” I hope those mirrors don’t make me look fat!

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

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Painting for Portrait Lovers; Art Fair Ahoy!

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Adam Clague, “Judy.” Oil on gesso. 12×12″

“Judy” is a beautiful, sensitive, strong portrait. Immediately, the viewer sees who this person is, intuits her personality, feels her pride and senses her values.

Portrait painters Adam Clague and Amy Karnes are hosting a three-day portrait paintng workshop at the National Musuem of Wildlife Art, September 5-7th, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm each day, in Jackson, Wyoming

“Join us as we share the valuable [artistic] principles necessary [to know in order to] paint realistic portraits and build powerful figurative compositions,” says Jackson-based artist Karnes. The pair are confident that no matter how adept an artist’s figurative skills may be, they’ll improve with this workshop.

Adam Clague, Detail from "Sweet and Savory." Sold.

Adam Clague, Detail from “Sweet and Savory.” Sold.

Claugue, a Kansas City artist, began painting portraits when, on a whim, he entered a painting of some soup cans in a state fair and took first prize. At school, Clauge became so adept at portraiture that he also began teaching art. Checking his website, it’s clear that Clauge’s devotion to spiritual faith plays a strong role in his work. Realizing this, you understand his bent for perfection in reproducing Nature and the human form on canvas.

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Wild & Precious Life: Post #541

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“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” ~ Mary Oliver

Well, give my heart to all of you. That’s one thing, and after a while I’ll be doing it again. In less than a month I depart Jackson Hole for an extended stay in my New England home. I’ve been reading your emails and resisting my own default button: write a blog post! Surrounded by brown boxes, packing tape, piles and piles of stuff I didn’t know I had, and an ever-shifting list of moving chores, I’ve had to curtail writing about art. 

"Passage #39" - Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x72"

I miss it so. I will miss you deeply. You artists, you galleries, you museums and auctions, you wild and crazy fun events, salons, exhibits, Fall Arts Festivals~~~and most of all, the blissful, heavenly days spent out in Grand Teton National Park watching painters capture this beauty~~~feeling so proud to be present. To get to tell the world about your adventures, even as I’m on my own adventure. There’s so much more to learn. This website, together with soaking in the West’s stupendous art histories, has changed my life.

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Thank you for your trust and respect. Thank you for allowing me to share with the world (and the world does see!) the power of Jackson Hole art. Once I’ve settled some, I’ll be back to thinking and writing about you.

I’m proud of the Jackson Hole Art Blogsix years old, plus. This is post #541.

971071_575727195817073_81363745_nI know the Blog’s mission is appreciated. It’s the first blog of its kind in Jackson. Most importantly, I love you all and am blessed by your friendship, your support and the countless projects we’ve shared. We started something! I’m grateful for my experiences and affiliations with the Grand Teton Association and Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters, Artists in the Environment, Greg McHuron, Bert Raynes, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, Altamira Fine Art, the Brookover Gallery, Trio Fine Art, Homestead Magazine, our newspapers, Jackson’s Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson Hole Art Auction, Wyoming ArtsWyoming Public Media and all Blog sponsors. Each and every artist!

With any luck I’ll pull my head out of the basement and see you in the coming weeks. If we miss one another, you know where to reach me, and I know where to reach you.

Look outside your immediate selves and your generation; rescue whenever possible and appropriate. Volunteer in places and for causes that aren’t “sexy.” Stay honest.

Keep sending your news. Though I can’t write about them for a while, I always want to hear what you’re doing with your wild and precious lives.

Namasté!   ~~~~ Tammy

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Leading the Art Association Way; Metal Work

Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at aajhsubmissions@gmail.com, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.

www.artassociation.org

A Wildlife Art “Staycation” & Big Strategic Plans

 

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Vacation, all I ever wanted; Vacation, have to get away~~Love that song, but I can’t find a video of Belinda Carlisle actually sounding GOOD singing that song. Hmm.

“Staycation!” If you’re having one of those, and Hill Climb vroom-vroom reverberates endlessly in your brain, escape. The National Museum of Wildlife Art is a nice place to visit. Friends and I recently enjoyed a terrific gallery talk on art’s “conservation” timeline. How did artists understand the concept of conservation in Darwin’s era, and how do they understand it now? You may be up on the subject, but listening to an excellent talk on the works comprising “Darwin’s Legacy,” all the way to Carl Rungius work and provided fresh knowledge.

Image from January, 2014's NMWA "Mix'd Media" Event

Image from January, 2014’s NMWA “Mix’d Media” Event

One woman, well versed on the topics of wildlife migration, habitat and wildlife art history, kept interrupting our guide. Without bothering to raise her hand she repeatedly cut into the lecture. DON’T do that, people! Despite her static, we thoroughly enjoyed the talk, which was simultaneously informal and informative.

The museum’s next “First Sunday” event takes place April 6, 11am – 5pm. Entry is free, and the public can “can step outside their everyday experience,” watch wildlife-themed films and explore the galleries.

“With exhibitions displaying larger than life depictions of lions, tigers and cheetahs, and films that include cougar tracking in Jackson’s own Tetons backyard, our April ‘First Sundays’ program offers a sort of exotic getaway right here in Jackson Hole,” says Director of Programming and Exhibitions Becky Kimmel. “Films on view include “North America: Born to be Wild,” a journey through some of the exotic wildlife at large in North American backyards; “American Cougar,”  taking a look at Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project and “Animal Odd Couples.”  The latter film delves into entertaining and affecting cross-species relationships. Films are shown courtesy of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. 

The night we visited, we witnessed at least 50 deer grazing the museum’s dusty, windblown bluffs. Miraculous!  www.wildlifeart.org

Robert Batema -Rocky Wilderness Cougar - Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

Robert Bateman – Rocky Wilderness Cougar – Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

The National Museum of Wildlife Art has issued a statement regarding the institution’s adopted strategic plan. Details should be available in a few months, but for now you can plan on the museum continuing to work to build financial stability and a strong endowment, further develop its permanent collection and create high-quality visitor experiences.

Perhaps most interestingly, a reallocation of building space will occur. “Trustees, staff and volunteers have engaged in several planning exercises to address particular elements of the strategic plan, and the Museum has engaged architects and other planning and programming professionals to determine the feasibility of particular elements,” says the museum. “The Board of Trustees will discuss all the current components of the strategic plan at their forthcoming retreat and board meeting in May.”