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Posts from ‘Native American’

Apr
14
David Grossman - Blossoming Trees - Oil on Linen - 8x10"

David Grossman – Blossoming Trees – Oil on Linen – 8×10″

“No, I said: What kind of bird are YOU?” ~ Sam, to Suzy, upon their first meeting in the film “Moonrise Kingdom.”  

Contemplative, visual poems. Painterly, reminding me of a wistful Childe Hassam; contemporary, like a print; gentle, glowing and linear. Colorado painter David Grossman is one of three new artists signed on to Altamira Fine Art. Grossman is joined by contemporary artists David Michael Slonim and bold trendsetter Thom Ross.

Attribute it to the soft, indecisive changing of our alpine seasons, call it a love of landscape. My heart has been stolen by Grossman’s diminutive oil painting, shown above. He paints, says the gallery, “abstracted visions of forests…melodic in their focus on rhythm and symmetry.” Adds Fine Art Connoisseur: “[Grossman's paintings] effect the comfort and relief of a ‘visual exhale’ while also leading us into meditative contemplation and thought.”

A few brushstrokes and we are eras away in time, lost in a happy composition. 

Thom Ross - Gunman's Walk - Oil on Canvas 48 x 48"

Thom Ross – Gunman’s Walk – Oil on Canvas
48 x 48″

Have you been around Jackson long enough to remember California born artist Thom Ross’ installation at Snow King’s base? “Custer’s Last Stand” was an erected forest of early American soldiers pitted against Native Americans. We walked through and around the battle, and though that battle is one of the West’s most defining moments, Ross’ style is to portray iconic Americans and events in off-beat (gunmen with tiny heads!), sometimes complex and unexpected ways. He can be sensitive and elegiac; friends own an early Thom Ross painting depicting a solitary dead horse, lying on its side. It’s beautiful.

“Indians playing croquet; General Custer riding off while balancing a table on his head; Sheriff Pat Garrett standing with shotgun in hands bracing against the cold of a wintry New Mexico morning – these are a few of the unique images depicted in Ross’s paintings,” says Altamira. In addition to creating his art, Ross runs his own space, “Due West Gallery,” in Santa Fe.

David Michael Slonim - Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas-48 x 60"

David Michael Slonim – Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas- 48 x 60″

They are landscapes; landscapes deconstructed to layered, broad color fields, conveying essence. Contemporary painter David Michael Slonim is the third “new bird” to alight at Altamira. Plein air painting and illustration are part of his professional artistic experience.

Prisms, shards of translucent glass, collage — these I see in the artist’s expressionist works. Slonim is influenced by a bevy of masters, including Diebenkorn, Mitchell, Motherwell, de Kooning, and Cezanne.

“Although my paintings are derived from nature, they are really about color, shape, texture and line for their own sake,” says Slonim. “I started out as a plein air painter. The more I painted and studied, the more fascinated I became with abstraction. Now I am more interested in interpreting nature than representing nature.”  www.altamiraart.com 

Kyle Pozin - Mystic Warrior

Kyle Polzin – Mystic Warrior -Oil- 74 x 30″

In case you haven’t heard: April 5th’s Scottsdale Art Auction brought in $12.6 million.

Ecstatic press materials report that Frederic Remington’s “The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero,” an oil estimated between $500,000 – $700,000, sold for $920,000, the top sale of the day. Many deceased and contemporary masters did exceedingly well, but, emphasizes the auction:

“The crowd of almost 500 bidders was stunned when a 40-year-old artist from Texas, Kyle Polzin, took the block with a 74 x 30 inch oil entitled “Mystic Warrior.” Estimated up to $40,000, an extended bidding war ended in a hush, as auctioneer Jason Brooks carefully guided bids to a final total of $287,500.”

The Scottsdale Art Auction has now realized over $100,000,000 in art sales over the course of a decade. For complete results, visit www.scottsdaleartauction.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Nov
08

exhibition-149

In what seems like a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away, Jackson artist Jenny Dowd opened her first show here,“Teeth.”  Inspiration for Dowd’s works were Renaissance curiosity cabinets, also known as “Cabinets of Wonder,” or as the National Museum of Wildlife Art (NMWA) notes, “Wunderkammer.”

“Teeth,” we wrote of Dowd’s exhibit, “suggests the De Stijl movement’s purity and pared down universality – as well as its spirituality – imposed upon …curiosity cabinets, likely the original ‘found object’ art form. Those cabinets were small, framed stages filled with collected objects, their maker’s assembly of natural and unnatural articles. Often displaying botanical specimens, curiosity cabinets were attempts to understand and control the world while providing a way to marvel at its mysteries.”

wondercabinet1_sm7f494fThe cabinets were also precursors to museums, says NMWA. Their new exhibition, “Wonder Cabinet,” conceived by Assistant Museum Curator Bronwyn Minton, invites us to look in on these mysterious marvels, which were “a way for each individual to display his wealth and knowledge of the world.” The show is Minton’s third community-focused exhibit~~plaster insects, butterfly shadow boxes, NMWA artworks and commissioned works are all part of the show.

“Wonder Cabinet” opens Thursday, November 14th, 6:00-9:00 pm, at this month’s NMWA “Mix’d Media.” The fun happens in Johnson Hall, and all comers have the chance to create and take home their own “wonder objects.” All are welcome, and donations are encouraged!  www.wildlifeart.org

David W. Wharton - "The West, A & B"

David W. Wharton – “The West, A & B”

“My contemporary work attempts to revive the color, spirit and spiritual designs of the American Plains Indians.” ~ David W. Wharton 

In his seminal history of the arts and Yellowstone, “Drawn to Yellowstone: Artists in America’s First National Park,” Peter H. Hassrick cites Livingston, Montana artist David W. Wharton’s work as emblematic of a contemporary, dramatic thematic shift artists made when capturing Yellowstone.

It’s my feeling the author admired Wharton’s brave stepping away from simply glorifying the Park; you are no arts chump if your work is included in Hassrick’s remarkable book. Wharton, an avid fly fisherman, instead chose to comment on our invasion and misuse of Yellowstone’s great natural resources, Native Americans and wildlife.

David W. Wharton - Yellowstone

David W. Wharton – Yellowstone

“My thoughts and work have always been about the Yellowstone country and that of the Native Americans. We live where they died, we exist today because we stole their land,” states Wharton. “As long as I live in this proximity of Yellowstone, I will always pray to the spirit of this amazing place and the culture of what must have been [imbued with] innocence, freedom and the will to survive.”

Wharton’s arresting, colorful graphic designs appear in his watercolors, lithographs, monoprints and digital imagery. His work is as intricate as a quilt, boldly bright and so intriguing. The longer we look, the more wildlife symbols, basketry, morning star patterns and magic phenomena appear. If these twirling, interlocked symbols are morning stars, Wharton could be depicting his reverence for spirits and ancestors, as well as praying for the plentiful return of a culture and respect for nature’s bounty. Plains Indians communicated with symbols; one source says that the morning star represents a bright and twinkling Venus.

In fact, says Wharton, many of the patterns are based on ancient Islamic tiles and designs dating back to the Byzantine era. Wharton combines and rotates ancient and contemporary motifs for each work.

Wharton’s arts and non-profit leadership experience is extensive. Founding Director of Fine Arts at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts and Humanities, he’s served as Assistant Professor of arts at Whitman and Colorado Colleges. From one edge of this country to the other, Wharton has directed the Florida Keys Council for the Arts and served as Executive Director of Alaska Transportation & Industry, in Wasilla. He’s currently represented by Sun Valley’s prestigious Gail Severn Gallery.

“I believe that we as a culture have “nickeled and dimed” the Native American Indian culture,” says Wharton. “We have reduced that freedom of the Plains Indians to mere remembrance of what was once a mighty nation. And we pay in beaded and feathered souvenirs. Alvin Josephy researched this culture extensively, as did Grinnell, Curtis and Catlin.”  www.davidwwharton.com

 

 

Sep
08
John Nieto - God's Dog (Coyote)

John Nieto – God’s Dog (Coyote) – Altamira Fine Art

Just for you, here’s the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, Week Number Two!

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Grand Teton Gallery: Meet the Artists.  4-8:00 pm. Stop into Grand Teton Gallery and meet artists Gary Keimig, Les LeFevre, Tom Lucas, Rip Caswell, Al Hone, Mike Rangner, Chuck Middlekauff, Deb Penk, and Jane Coleman. That’s a lot of artists! You can bet on good energy!  FREE. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172  www.grandtetongallery.com

Mountain Trails Gallery presents “Andrew Bolam: Icons of the American West.”  5-8:00 pm. New to the Western pop scene, Bolam introduces us to his newest works depicting wildlife and portraits of Native American Indian chiefs. Light refreshments. FREE.  155 Center Street, 307.734.8150 www.mtntrails.net

Kay Stratman - Mountain Lake Memory

Kay Stratman – Mountain Lake Memory

“New Horizons IV” Gallery Opening at Horizon Fine Art.  This group show opens today and runs through the end of Fall Arts, September 15th. This year’s group includes  Dean Bradshaw, Bregelle Whitworth Davis, Nicole Gaitan, Jill Hartley, Linda Israel, Monica Jansen, Mark Kelso, Jack Koonce, Sarah Rogers, Karen Sebesta, Kay Stratman, and Pete Zaluzec. Stratman and other local artists are featured in filmmaker Jennifer Tennican’s new short film focusing on the arts. FREE.  30 King Street, 307.739.1540, www.horizonfineartgallery.com

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Sharon Thomas

Art by Sharon Thomas

Fall Arts Festival Open Studio Tour ~ Jackson Hole Art Association. 5:30-7:30 pm. Art Association artists will be on hand to display their work and offer fun, family-friendly demonstrations and arts activities during tonight’s open studio. Wander through, enjoy music and refreshments, and meet noted local artists like Sharon Thomas and Fred Kingwill. Artists and works representing almost every conceivable form of media will be there. Raku firings, ceramics (pottery) throwing (Sam Dowd), painting and printmaking happen! FREE. All studios. Location: Jackson’s Center for the Arts, 240 S. Glenwood, downtown Jackson. www.artassociation.org

Grand Teton Gallery Artists in Residence. Deb Penk paints with acrylics and Al Hone sculpts on site, 11:00am-3:00pm. Jane Coleman paints and Rip Caswell returns to sculpt—Mike Rangner paints, using oils from 1:00-5:00pm. FREE. 130 West Broadway, 307.201.1172  www.grandtetongallery.com

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 – HAPPY BIRTHDAY, DAD! LOVE YOU!

Jewelry and Artisan Luncheon ~ 11:00am-4:00pm.  At the Four Seasons in Teton Village, this event is the first in a series of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s annual Western Visions events, a Fall Arts Festival tradition. Ladies only at this one!  Lunch—really, you get to stay and enjoy yourself for five hours—is $100 per person. Proceeds benefit the museum’s Education Programming. Official registration ended September 4, but call 307.732.5411 for more information. www.WesternVisions.org 

John Nieto - Ring Thunder

John Nieto – Ring Thunder

Altamira Fine Art - Gallery Reception – John Nieto: Forces of Color and Spirit  5-8:00 pm.

“My art develops and changes as my vision changes,” says the great American expressionist artist John Nieto. “I put a lot of energy into the paintings, and I think people get that back. Whether it is a child or an 80-year-old, I want people to respond intuitively, because of their feelings. Art is my way of being a citizen of the universe. I felt as if I had spent my whole life learning a language, and finally I was fluent. I could see paintings in my mind and realize them on canvas more accurately than ever.”

Nieto, a  highly distinguished elder citizen of the universe, is miraculously more prolific than ever. His embrace is a full life embrace; each painting is a celebration–stunning and colorful–and created with powerful respect and profound love for his native roots, the earth and its inhabitants. Nieto established a painting style many attempt to emulate, but nobody can match. FREE. My favorites? Nieto’s Fancy Dancers. This exhibition remains on display through September 21st. Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, www.altamiraart.com

Ashley Tudor - Bronze Elk Mount

Ashley Tudor – Bronze Elk Mount

WRJ Associates Hosts Ashley Tudor. 6 pm – 8 pm. Tudor, a San Francisco-based artist, will showcase her “Trophies” series, works that explore “the intersection of the natural world and the human role in it.” Tudor works using mixed media, primarily creating sculpture. She is, writes WRJ, an avid outdoorsman, hunter and field-to-table chef. She must cut quite a figure in the San Francisco arts scene; she “loves any excuse to get into the mountains, valleys, and fields, especially to search out her own food.” Tudor has lectured at the California College of the Art, IDSA, and Stanford University.

“Civilized life has become too tame. In our comfort it is easy to be detached from the natural world. Food arrives at our table with little thought to its origin or life,” says Tudor. “The natural world has been sanitized, manicured, and separated from emotion. One forgets that our existence comes from the creative destruction of other life.” FREE. www.wrjassociates.com 

imagesArt Walk! 5-8:00 pm. Downtown Jackson. Join more than 30 Jackson art galleries for the “Third Thursdays Art Walk” — still happening on Wednesday this Fall Arts Festival Week. FREE. Look for participating gallery Art Walk banners! All galleries listed here as hosting events today, at this time, are participants.

Trio Fine Art – 5-8:00 pm. Opening reception for “In our Valley” Group exhibition, highlighting landscapes depicting the Greater Yellowstone ecosystem, created by Trio artists Bill Sawczuck, Kathryn Mapes Turner and Jennifer L. Hoffman. “There is so much more to this place than first meets the eye,” says Hoffman. “When you live here and absorb the surroundings, you begin to notice the subtlety and the grandeur, the history and the natural beauty.”  FREE. www.triofineart.com

Jennifer L. Hoffman - The Road Home

Jennifer L. Hoffman – The Road Home

Poster Signing with Jason Rich- Legacy Gallery. 3:00-5:00pm. Meet 2013′s Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival featured artist Jason Rich and receive a personally signed poster of his featured painting, “River Overlook: Gros Ventre River Ranch.” FREE to attend, but posters are $30 unsigned and $40 signed. Call the Jackson Chamber of Commerce for information: 307.733.3316 or email info@jacksonholechamber.com. Legacy Gallery, 75 North Cache Street, 307.733.2353  www.legacygallery.com 

Grand Teton Gallery Artists in Residence. Deb Penk and Gayle Weisfield paint on site 11:00am-3:00pm. From 1-5:00 pm, Michael Orwick and Carrie Wild paint, and Rip Caswell will demonstrate sculpting. FREE.  307.201.1172. www.grandtetongallery.com

Carrie Wild - Call of the Wild

Carrie Wild – Call of the Wild

Artists Reception and Trunk Show – Horizon Fine Art. 5-8:00 pm. Local jewelry craftsperson Monica Jensen hosts a trunk show of her creations, and the gallery’s featured artists will be on hand to lead an arts discussion. Demonstrations. FREE. 30 King Street, 307.739.1540 www.horizonfineartgallery.com

RARE Gallery Opening  - More jewelry! Jewelry craftsperson Petra Class shows her new work, noon-4:00 pm. Class’ jewelry is made with cut stones and 22K sets, says RARE. The gallery states that her work is all “personally made,” which may mean she does custom work or that her jewelry is hand made—or both. Come and find out! FREE. 60 E. Broadway 2nd Floor, www.raregalleryjacksonhole.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

Veryl Goodnight - Born to Run

Veryl Goodnight – Born to Run

National Museum of Wildlife Art – “Going Wild” with Veryl Goodnight. The noted sculptor, one of two 2013 featured artists, gives a lecture and a workshop, 10 – 11:00 am. Tickets are $75 per person; and painter Mark Eberhard, whose brilliantly colored paintings of birds balance so impressively between realism and contemporary naturalism, gives a process workshop from 1:00-2:30 pm. Tickets are $75 per person. If you’d like to attend both events, a “bundle” ticket price of $100 gets you in! National Museum of Wildlife Art, 2820 Rungius Road, 307.733.5771  www.wildlifeart.org, www.westernvisions.org 

R. Tom Gilleon - End of Yellow Day

R. Tom Gilleon – End of Yellow Day

Altamira Fine Art: Meet the Artists: R. Tom Gilleon and Greg Woodard. 1:00-3:00pm. Montana artist Gilleon is renowned for his glowing paintings of tipis and his growing collection of portraits of Native Americans and interpretations of Western symbols. Woodard’s powerful sculptures seem to erupt from the earth—they’re artifacts uncovered. FREE. 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, www.altamiraart.com

By Kat Housemann

By Kat Housemann

MADE, in Gaslight Alley, holds an artist’s reception for painter Kat Housemann, MADE’s Fall Arts Festival featured artist. 5-8:00 pm. FREE. A Montana native, Houseman frequented the C.M. Russell Museum early in her art career. Her work is a punchy, colorful mix of the academic and Western, with a vivid contemporary flair. www.madejacksonhole.com 

Grand Teton Gallery Artists in Residence – Jim Reid and Jody Kroeger. Reid paints on site and Kroeger will give a sculpture demonstration. Carrie Wild, known for her hot colors and contemporary Western themes, will demonstrate. 11:00 am – 3:00 pm. From 1-5:00 pm, Michael Orwick paints and Rip Caswell gives yet another a sculpture demonstration. FREE. 130 West Broadway, www.grandtetongallery.com

Astoria Fine Art Gallery Reception with featured artist Josh Legg. 3-6:00 pm at Astoria, on the Town Square. FREE. 307.733.4016  www.astoriafineart.com

RARE Gallery’s Rick Armstrong  will bring out some of his favorite works from his show “Through the Eyes.” These works were not included in the show of the same name earlier that took place earlier in the Festival. Additionally, sculptor Mark Yale Harris will be on hand to discuss his art. 2-5:00 pm. FREE. www.raregalleryjacksonhole.com

wv-toppic-10

Western Visions Miniatures and More Show & Sale’s “Wild West Artist Party” at the National Museum of Wildlife Art.  6:30-10:30 pm. A great party! Relaxed, and fully stocked with lots of good food, a full bar and live entertainment, this evening’s party gives artists, patrons and their guests an opportunity to view works to be auctioned off at the Sale. Lots of time to peruse the multitude of works included in this event. The Jewelry and Artisan Show & Sale, the Original Prints Show & Sale and the Sketch Show & Sale are open to the public during this event, and artists are on site. The museum notes everyone should have been registered by September 4th! If you have questions or would like to squeeze in, phone 307.732.5411. Tickets are $150 per person. www.wildlifeart.org, www.westernvisions.org 

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

September Vhay - Summer's Glance

September Vhay – Summer’s Glance

Altamira Fine Art: Meet the Artists – September Vhay and Mary Roberson will be at the gallery to talk with visitors. Relaxed, informal, fun! 1-3:00 pm.  172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, www.altamiraart.com

E. Martin Hennings (1866-1956) Mountain Retreat

E. Martin Hennings (1866-1956) Mountain Retreat

Preview the 2013 Jackson Hole Art Auction! 10:oo am today AND 9:00 am – Noon on Saturday, September 14th. Stroll over to the Center for the Arts theater lobby, and the theater itself—AND backstage—to preview ALL works (some 280) that will be auctioned off at September 14th’s Jackson Hole Art Auction. An opportunity for EVERYONE to view great works of art, whether you are a collector or simply want a chance to view historic and contemporary Western masterpieces. Open to the public, FREE. The Jackson Hole Art Auction takes place Saturday, September 14th. You may register to bid right up until showtime! See details below! www.jacksonholeartauction.com 

HomesteadMagazine2012The Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes–Today, 10:oo am – 4:00 pm; Tomorrow, September 14th, Noon-6pm. Large, expensive houses available for the public to see. This “Showcase of Homes” tour escorts you to a selection of custom Jackson Hole homes.Visit homes designed and decorated by many of the valley’s most sought-after architects, builders and designers. Contemporary, log–it’s all on the tour. SELF GUIDEDHosted by Homestead Magazine (Hey, I’ve written for them! Great magazine!). Many artisans will be on hand. Proceeds are donated to local charities. Ticket price: $75. www.homesteadmag.com

26th Annual Western Visions: Miniatures and More Show and Sale – National Museum of Wildlife Art.  3:30 – 8:00 pm. Yes, you should have been registered by September 4th, but do try calling 307.732.5411 for information. Tickets are $100 per person or $200 for a combo ticket for Thursday and Friday. Today is your last chance to place bids on Western Vision works; the evening includes sparkling festivities, but, most importantly, winning bidders are drawn. All Western Visions shows are on display. www.westernvisions.org, www.wildlifeart.org 

WV Featured Artist Mark Eberhard

WV Featured Artist Mark Eberhard

Legacy Gallery – Tim Shinabarger One Man Show. Artist’s reception, 2-4:00 pm. wildlife sculptor Tim Shinabarger has been working for two years preparing for this! Ten new works– depicting North American and African wildlife subjects–will be exhibited. Some works available for sale by draw.  www.legacygallery.com

Mountain Trails Gallery – Mark Gibson: Western Radiance. 5-8:00 pmGibson’s lit-from-within paintings of tipis and landscapes are contemporary in style, but have the sense they’ve been sprinkled with a fine bit of classical dust. FREE. Light refreshments. www.mtntrails.net

Joshua Tobey & Friend

Joshua Tobey & Friend

Astoria Fine Art Reception – Greg Beecham and Joshua Tobey.  1-4:00 pm. That lighthearted sculptor of wildlife Joshua Tobey pairs up with wildlife artist Greg Beecham. Good match! Astoria’s collection of artists is highly evocative of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s permanent collection. FREE. 307.733.4016  www.astoriafineart.com 

Grand Teton Gallery Artists in Residence – Rip Caswell is working long hours this year! Caswell and artist Tammy Bality team up for sculpture demonstrations; the latter works 11:00 am – 3:00 pm, and the former is on deck 1-5:00 pm. Caswell will be joined by artists Bob Coonts, Kelly Singleton and Doug Monson. 307.201.1172  www.grandtetongallery.com

RARE Gallery – Gallery Artists Works on Exhibition. Noon-3:00 pm. In addition to works already featured, Kevin Box exhibits origami sculptures described as super stimulating when it comes to contemplating art’s physical space. FREE. www.raregalleryjacksonhole.com

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14

36297_4587744693870_688878886_n18th Annual Jackson Hole QuickDraw Art Sale and Auction – 9:00 am on the Jackson Town Square. Without a doubt, the annual QuickDraw is one of the Festival’s most exhuberant, signature events. Come to the Town Square and watch local and regional artists—all are represented by galleries and/or museums in our region—create art in a very fast 90-minute race to create!  That time is up from an hour, I believe; still VERY fast. Dozens of artists participate. Immediately following, works are auctioned off, including “River Outlook: Gros Ventre River Ranch” by Jason Rich, this year’s Festival Featured Artist. FREE. A Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce event. www.jacksonholechamber.com

Maynard Dixon (1875-1946) Remuda 1921-1945, oil on canvas 25x30"

Maynard Dixon (1875-1946) Remuda 1921-1945, oil on canvas 25×30″

Jackson Hole Art Auction at Jackson’s Center for the Arts – Sale begins at NOON. The Jackson Hole Art Auction, a live, rocket-paced Western art auction in every sense, is defined by the high standard of works offered for sale; lots include art by contemporary artists and deceased masters. The auction has established itself as one of the country’s premier Western art events, and collectors from around the world flock to bid. Bidding takes place at the auction, by phone, by pre-bid or on line.

During a visit to the auction offices, I received a tour of works on hand. “This is our wall of major players, and “Remuda” by Dixon is one of our stars,” noted Jackson Hole Art Auction coordinator Jill Callahan as we perused 2013′s Auction highlights. “Dixon’s been doing very, very well at auction; a recent major Western auction offered a number of Dixons, and they all sold far over estimate. We have Donald J. Hagerty, a Dixon expert, writing an entry for our catalog, and he considers this painting to be one of Dixon’s super works, completed completed just before his death. Dixon often kept what he considered his best works. He started “Remuda” in 1921 and hung onto it, finishing it in 1945. The painting is double-dated, very rare.”  The auction has also acquired at least two rare-to-the-market Farnys.

Henry Farny (1847-1916) - Indian Encampment, 1901

Henry Farny (1847-1916) – Indian Encampment, 1901

Henry Farny. Wilson Hurley. E. Martin Hennings. George Caitlin. Edgar Payne, Clyde Aspevig, Michael Coleman, Gerard Curtis Delano, Ken Riley, Henrietta Wyeth…the list of Great Masters in this year’s Jackson Hole Art Auction is mind boggling. An on-line catalog is available; you may view it by clicking here. You must register to attend. Approximately 280 lots will be up for sale; expect a solid five hour sale. To register, please contact the auction offices at 866.549.9278 or visit their website: www.jacksonholeartauction.com. Email: coordinator@jacksonholeartauction.com. 

Duke Beardsley - Getting Choosy

Duke Beardsley – Getting Choosy

Altamira Fine Art: Meet the Artists –  1-3:00 pm. Jared Sanders, Amy Ringholz (2012′s Fall Arts Festival Featured Artist), and Duke Beardsley, whose latest pop-style paintings of cowboys are partially influenced Beardsley’s recent trip to China, will all be on hand to mingle with visitors and talk about their work. FREE. Altamira Fine Art, 172 Center Street, 307.739.4700, www.altamiraart.com

Watercolor by Fred Kingwill

Watercolor by Fred Kingwill

Artists in the Environment – Fred Kingwill. Join one of Jackson’s most beloved plein air painters, watercolorists and teachers, Fred Kingwill, for the summer’s final “Artists in the Environment,” at String Lake, Grand Teton National Park, 9:00 am – 12:00 pm. His snow scene, “Christmas in the Tetons,” won 2010′s Capitol Christmas Tree Contest, underscoring Kingwill’s national reputation as a noted watercolorist. Presented by the Grand Teton Association. FREE. www.grandtetonpark.org 

Trailside Galleries’ Annual Fall Gold Exhibition: Artists Reception. 5-7:00 pm. Works are for sale; all paintings to be sold by draw at 6:30 pm. The exhibition focuses on nature, sporting art, and the wild’s beauties and mysteries. Many new artists; a show “nicely balanced to suit all tastes.” Take part in a tradition that goes back three decades. www.trailsidegalleries.com 

Mountain Trails: Quick Draw Artists Featured –  2-6:00 pm. The gallery welcomes a bundle of favorite artists, and all of them will be fresh off the morning’s Quick Draw. Visit with Dustin Payne, Amy Poor, Chris Navarro, Jeff Ham, Troy Collins, John Potter, and Nicholas Coleman. Light refreshments–that’s good, those artists will be hungry! Mountain Trails Gallery, 155 Center Street, 307.734.8150  www.mtntrails.net

Tom Mangelsen - A Summer Affair

Tom Mangelsen – A Summer Affair

Mangelsen – Images of Nature Gallery’s Fall Reception. 6:00-9:00pm. When you’ve finished bidding at the Jackson Hole Art Auction, head over to wildlife and landscape photographer Tom Mangelsen’s gallery on North Cache, next to Teton Mountaineering. A hip crowd attends, and Mangelsen will be on hand to enjoy your company and tell you about his latest photographs. He’s a great storyteller, and his quest to capture nature around the world forever excites us. Mangelsen and his co-author, noted biology professor Paul Johnsgard, will sign copies of  their new book “Yellowstone and Wildlife: Ecology and Natural History of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.” FREE. Images of Nature Gallery, 170 N. Cache, (307) 733-9752 www.mangelsen.com

Julie Jeppsen -  "Double Trouble"

Julie Jeppsen -
“Double Trouble”

Wilcox Gallery – Reception, Wildlife & Wildlands, at the downtown Wilcox Gallery location. 5-9:00 pm. An all-gallery artists reception featuring a host of Wilcox artists, several who are new to the gallery. Judy Kelley, who works with gourds and pine needles, is enchanted by nature’s textures and color. Other artists include Wilcox, Dave Wade, Julie Jeppsen, Sandy Scott, Rosetta, Tim Whitworth and more. www.wilcoxgallery.com 

Astoria Fine Art Gallery Reception – Mark Eberhard.  10:00am-1:00pm. Remember my remark about Astoria’s reflecting the museum’s art mission? Intentional or not (I think: intentional!), Mark Eberhard, the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Western Visions featured painter, will be featured at Astoria; the gallery says over 25 artists will be on hand! FREE.  www.astoriafineart.com 

Artwork by D. Lee

Artwork by D. Lee

Horizon Fine Art Quick Draw Artists Reception. 9am-Noon. Though this event apparently overlaps the Quick Draw, Horizon invites you to stop by and view Quickdraw artist D. Lee’s equine and wildlife art, along with the works of Dean Bradshaw and Kay Stratman. FREE.  www.horizonfineartgallery.com

RARE Gallery: Meet the Artist: Pat Flynn. Noon-5:00pm. Jewelry, made from diamonds and gold, created by Flynn, are center stage. FREE. www.raregalleryjacksonhole.com

Grand Teton Gallery Artists’ Reception 4:00-8:00pm. Caswell again! Stop by the gallery to visit with Caswell, Doug Monson, Gayle Weisfield, Bob Coonts, Tammy Bality, Jim Reid, Kelly Singleton, Narrie Toole, Deb Penk, and Carrie Wild. FREE. www.grandtetongallery.com 

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

One cowboy to another cowboy, lookin’ for something to do: “We could have a shoot-out, then brunch.”  

images-21Art Brunch Gallery Walk-All Around the Town. Approximately 10:00 am – 3:00 pm.  It’s Bloody Mary time! And time to unwind, de-brief and bid 2013′s Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival a fond adieu. Brunch is served along with vodka-enhanced tomato juice drinks, and you can expect to find champagne and coffee, too. Follow the crowds; many galleries participate. Linger, enjoy! Gallery artists are often in attendance, too. The Jackson Hole Chamber has a gallery map–visit their website: www.jacksonholechamber.com or phone 307.733.3316.  It’s Sunday, and in case the Chamber doesn’t pick up, phone ahead!  Here are a few participating galleries–all brunching is FREE!

Altamira Fine Art FAF Brunch: 11:00 am – 2:00 pm.  Stop in to Altamira to toast 2013′s Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival!  www.altamiraart.com 

Trailside Galleries: Starting off at 10:00 am! Join friends and fellow collectors – debrief about the Jackson Hole Art Auction and Fall Gold Exhibition and Sale. Not to mention 50 years in the Western Art business! www.trailsidegalleries.com 

Horizon Fine Art Champagne Brunch. 10:00am-3:00pm. Gallery artists will be working at Horizon, while YOU watch and sample yummy food and drink! www.horizonfineartgallery.com

Grand Teton Gallery  11:00 – 3:00pm. Deb Penk and Rip Caswell (who must be awfully tired) will give demonstrations,as will Gayle Weisfieldwww.grandtetongallery.com

Diehl Gallery – 11:00 am – 3:00 pm.  Meet UK sculptor Simon Gudgeon & join the gallery for brunch. Gudgeon’s “Isis” is perhaps the most striking sculpture installed to date at the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Sculpture Trail. FREE. www.diehlgallery.com 

Mountain Trails Collector’s Brunch 10:00am – 2:00pm. Brunch that toasts the gallery’s collectors and artists. And the public is welcome, too.  www.mtntrails.net

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Jul
23
John Byrne Cooke

John Byrne Cooke

Jackson Hole’s own John Byrne Cooke knows this blog has a certain “tone.” Upon learning of writer/filmmaker/musician Cooke’s publication of his Janis Joplin memoir I asked if I could post the great news. His answer was “yes,” on condition that he do the writing.

Take it away, John!

“Longtime Jackson resident and musician (the Stagecoach Band, the Hoot) John Byrne Cooke was Janis Joplin’s road manager from December 1967 — six months after Joplin gained overnight stardom for her appearance at the Monterey Pop Festival – until her death in October 1970. In the 1990s, John wrote two different versions of the story of his time with Joplin, but he didn’t find the right form for the story until he returned to it two years ago. Recently, John’s agent sold the memoir to Berkley Books. John expects that it will be published sometime in 2014.

John will also be consulting on a documentary film about Joplin that her estate is co-producing. John showed his own films about Joplin at the Center for the Arts in 2011, as a benefit for the Jackson Hole Writers Conference. He hopes he will be able to show them again in Jackson when his book comes out.”

JBC, congratulations! A worthy, rich story composed by one of Jackson’s most recognized writers.  www.johnbyrnecooke.com

Janis Joplin - 1970

Janis Joplin – 1970

Damien Hirst - Psalm 65: Te decet hymnus  2008

Damien Hirst – Psalm 65: Te decet hymnus 2008

At Heather James Fine Art, in Jackson Hole, a major reinstallation has taken place. Gallery space is newly configured and filled with natural light, and eminent artists like Damien Hirst, Alexander Calder, Warhol, Fernando Botero, Thiebaud, Fonseca, Monet and sculptures–as well as prints—by Salvador Dali are on view. Heather James always provides surprises, and I was gratified to have the recent chance to take a gallery tour.

Several of Hirst’s famous Spot painting series are there; they’ve been in the news quite a bit. According to the New York Times, up until now the exact number of Spot (or “Dot,” as many people refer to them) paintings in existence has been unknown, but this fall a catalogue raisonné is to be released that determines Hirst’s Spot paintings number 1,365.

Of the Spot paintings — that seem impossible to balance with respect to color— Hirst has said, “To create that structure, to do those colours, and do nothing. I suddenly got what I wanted. It was just a way of pinning down the joy of colour.”  Beside the Spots, Heather James is showcasing colorful Hirst paintings—spinning colors—that, if you look closely, reveal one of Hirsts’ signature images.

Mary Anne Turley-Emett -  Hare

Mary Anne Turley-Emett -
Hare

But my favorite Hirsts are a pair of butterfly wing panels; when I viewed them the two works were arranged with cast resin sculptures of horses and hares by Mary Anne Turley-Emett. Emett’s sculptures are transluscent, each a different color, and grouped together are works are true eye candy. Perusing the gallery I returned several times to these works.

You will stroll past Hockneys, Korean ceramic sculptures, and in the “Impressionist Room” two unusually hued Monet paintings—one a study of towering sea cliffs and surf in painted in deep blues, the other a version of his fisherman’s cottage on a cliff; the latter is washed over in a soft pink hue.  Don’t miss the water lilies fragment!

A wall of Calders, a massive, explosively colored abstract Robert Natkin painting, canvases by Carlos Luna and “the closest thing to a realistic painting of a tipi you’ll ever see at Heather James,” a terrific piece by Robert Neuman, are amongst my faves. There are almost too many mind-blowing works at Heather James to mention— so visit! This summer, the gallery is alight with delectible art.  www.heatherjames.com 

Robert Natkin - Untitled

Robert Natkin – Untitled

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Jun
03
"Passage #39" - Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x72"

“Passage #39″ – Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 72″

Dan and Arlo Namingha; Theodore Waddell. What a pairing. Altamira Fine Art is the gallery to connect these dynamic, sublime artists in a double show, opening with an artists’ reception Thursday, June 6th, 5-7:00 pm. The Naminghas’ “Form & Symbolism” and Waddell’s “Abstract Angus” are ultimately about interpretation of place. All three artists’ native territories’ images and landscapes course through their veins, exploding on canvas and permeating sculptures.

How exhilirating for Thomas Hoving to compile his can’t-put-it-down biography “The Art of Dan Namingha.” The Namingha family’s history begins with Dan’s great-great-grandmother, famed Tewa/Hopi potter Nampeyo (photographed by Edward S. Curtis, c. 1905). The family tree is an arts dynasty. That’s a regal word to describe a creative clan so rooted in landscape and indigenous culture, but it’s an undeniable accreditation.

How to begin to describe Dan’s remarkable journey as an artist? Namingha’s initial influence was Hekytwi Mesa near the Hopi reservation where Namingha was born. Namingha’s work is phenomenally diverse, the breath of his artistic style is almost impossible to comprehend; he moves from complex arrangements of Hopi mesas, kachinas, spirals, sun and depictions of dual cultures he inhabits to minimalist, graphic, geometric landscapes. As a child, Hekytwi Mesa was the dominant landmark beyond Namingha’s grandparents’ door. Its presence left an endurable mark on the artist’s soul, and some version of Hekytwi Mesa appears in almost every Dan Namingha work.

"West of Oraibi" - D. Namhinga

“West of Oraibi” – D. Namhinga

“The presence of two cultures, he believes, also makes him sensitive to the dual nature of all things—night and day, past and future, then and now,” writes Hoving. Ultimately, Namingha’s exposure to his native culture, wise and encouraging mentors, and 20th century abstract modernism are melded in this remarkable body of work.

"Cultural Images #10" - Arlo Namingha

“Cultural Images #10″ – Arlo Namingha

Sculptor Arlo Namingha, Dan’s eldest son, became involved with carving at an early age. Surrounded by his family’s legacy and practices, his first carvings of Katsina dolls manifested early in life. Positive and negative space, geometric design, cosmology and Hopi/Tewa identity are interwoven in Arlo’s wood, clay, stone, fabricated and cast bronze sculptures.

“Using the idea of design, form and movement, I minimize these literal images not to recreate them but to draw from them and my personal experiences,” writes Arlo Namingha. “My work not only reflects the figurative aspect of my native people and cultural deities but also the idea of scenery and landscape as well as symbolism.”

"Horizon Horses #4" - Theodore Waddell

“Horizon Horses #4″ – Theodore Waddell

Theodore Waddell’s comment to “American Art Collector” about his work and this show is delectable. “Well, the modern guys didn’t like me because I used subject matter,” said Waddell. “And then Western guys didn’t like me because I was too modern.”

Somebody liked him. Waddell’s work is highly influenced by the Abstract Expressionist school. Though the artist didn’t initially realize how important those artists were to his vision, he continues to relate fully to the sense that paint has its own identity.

"Angus DR#24" - Theodore Waddell

“Angus DR#24″ – Theodore Waddell

In this show, we recognize the Montana artist and rancher’s signature painterly landscapes dotted with horses—often so abstracted as to resemble animal tracks rather than mature species. Waddell’s horses, cattle and bison—often black as coal—leave their mark below the thin blue line of Waddell’s mountain skylines. In Montana’s sky, clouds softly wave, like the sea. Waddell has expanded depth and range of color, suggestive of seasonal shifts in atmosphere, foliage and the earth’s tendancy to morph from fertile browns into hardened, impenetrable surfaces.

Alongside these works are fully abstract and interpretational works on paper from Waddell’s “Abstract Angus” series, recently exhibited at the Denver Art Museum. DeKooning is the expressionist I see most reflected in these illusive, amorphic works. They do, as the gallery has said, suggest the drift of grazing animals.

Western art encompasses so much more than the realism many of us associate with the term. But in the West, notes Waddell, we are a part of it all. This exhibition remains on display through June 15th.  To view all of Altamira’s artists, click on their website, www.altamiraart.com .

Camus Prairie Angus | 40/40" - Theodore Waddell

Camus Prairie Angus | 40/40″ – Theodore Waddell