Category Archives: Photography

View22 is 36! Tiny Preview, Jackson Hole Art Auction

Lee Riddell's "View 22: Open Studio Art" painting, "Summer Sky, R Park."

Lee Riddell’s “View 22: Open Studio Art” painting, “Summer Sky, R Park.”

“I love being a part of the View22 project – where the creation of art is both inspired by and contributes to the protection of wildlife habitat and open space for all to enjoy. As a landscape painter, being out on these properties emphasizes for me the importance of preserving these lands forever.” ~ View22 artist Lee Riddell

Since it’s inception, “View22,” an arts-inspired fundraiser for the Jackson Hole Land Trust, has been wildly successful. This is the second year local artists create works, sharing their own experiences outside, “open studio” style, at dedicated Land Trust locations to celebrate the organization’s 36th anniversary.

Bronwyn Minton, for "View22"

Bronwyn Minton, for “View22”

Green flags marking “open studio” locations are up now through August 14th. Locations include  the Hardeman Barn, Hardeman North, Wilson Centennial Ponds, Wilson Wetlands Trail, R Park, Emily’s Pond, Spring Creek Ranch, Rock Springs at JHMR, Karns Meadow, Flat Creek Corridor, South Park Service Center, Hatchet Meadows, and the Indian Springs Swan Ponds. Look for these flags, and you’ll find View22 artists at work, and waiting to talk to any and all visitors about the heart-thumping experience of painting on conservation land. 

Ben Roth's artwork is inspired by Spring Creek Ranch landscape.

Ben Roth’s artwork is inspired by Spring Creek Ranch landscape.

The project concludes with an exhibit and sale at the Land Trust’s 36th Annual Picnic on August 14th, 4-8:00 pm at Fish Creek Ranch in Wilson, WY. Families are welcome, music will play! Tickets are $50 for adults; kids 12 and under are free.

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Wild & Precious Life: Post #541

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“Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” ~ Mary Oliver

Well, give my heart to all of you. That’s one thing, and after a while I’ll be doing it again. In less than a month I depart Jackson Hole for an extended stay in my New England home. I’ve been reading your emails and resisting my own default button: write a blog post! Surrounded by brown boxes, packing tape, piles and piles of stuff I didn’t know I had, and an ever-shifting list of moving chores, I’ve had to curtail writing about art. 

"Passage #39" - Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x72"

I miss it so. I will miss you deeply. You artists, you galleries, you museums and auctions, you wild and crazy fun events, salons, exhibits, Fall Arts Festivals~~~and most of all, the blissful, heavenly days spent out in Grand Teton National Park watching painters capture this beauty~~~feeling so proud to be present. To get to tell the world about your adventures, even as I’m on my own adventure. There’s so much more to learn. This website, together with soaking in the West’s stupendous art histories, has changed my life.

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Thank you for your trust and respect. Thank you for allowing me to share with the world (and the world does see!) the power of Jackson Hole art. Once I’ve settled some, I’ll be back to thinking and writing about you.

I’m proud of the Jackson Hole Art Blogsix years old, plus. This is post #541.

971071_575727195817073_81363745_nI know the Blog’s mission is appreciated. It’s the first blog of its kind in Jackson. Most importantly, I love you all and am blessed by your friendship, your support and the countless projects we’ve shared. We started something! I’m grateful for my experiences and affiliations with the Grand Teton Association and Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters, Artists in the Environment, Greg McHuron, Bert Raynes, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, Altamira Fine Art, the Brookover Gallery, Trio Fine Art, Homestead Magazine, our newspapers, Jackson’s Chamber of Commerce, the Jackson Hole Art Auction, Wyoming ArtsWyoming Public Media and all Blog sponsors. Each and every artist!

With any luck I’ll pull my head out of the basement and see you in the coming weeks. If we miss one another, you know where to reach me, and I know where to reach you.

Look outside your immediate selves and your generation; rescue whenever possible and appropriate. Volunteer in places and for causes that aren’t “sexy.” Stay honest.

Keep sending your news. Though I can’t write about them for a while, I always want to hear what you’re doing with your wild and precious lives.

Namasté!   ~~~~ Tammy

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Testimonies: Teton Photography Group; Jeremy Morgan & CSA

Photograph by Nelson

Photograph by Loren Nelson

“Basic Digital Photography: How to Make Better Photographs With Your Digital Camera” is the second public educational symposium being offered by the Teton Photography Group, a group that’s come to include roughly 220 members, a phenomenal membership for an arts group less than a year old or for ANY non-profit group in a town our size! Photography, plentiful as sagebrush and as venerable as plein air, will become an official part of summer arts programs for the first time during the 2014 season.

Photograph by Linsdau

Photograph by Aaron Linsdau

“Education, sharing and networking” are the methods Teton Photography uses to advance the art. The event takes place Saturday, March 22, 2014 in the Black Box Theater at the Center for the Arts in Jackson, Wyoming. A half-day in length, the session runs 8:30 am  – 1:30 pm.

Photographers (check links for more about each artist) Loren NelsonAaron Linsdau, Michael Cohen and Mike Cavaroc will speak on such topics as basic photography gear, improving focus and sharpness, obtaining the best exposure and composition techniques that work. Beginners and intermediates should enjoy this session, which is open to the public, interactive and hands-on.

I don’t have written testimonies handy, but I could count on four hands the number of times Teton Photography members have described their own positive experiences gained from the group. $25 donation for advance reservations and $30 at the door. Call 307.733.6379 to register. www.tetonphotographygroup.org

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We mentioned this event a few weeks ago in a previous post on Alison Brush’s new arts ventures, but as it’s upon us, I’ll remind you all again that on Thursday, March 20th, 5-7 pm, noted San Francisco artist and visiting teacher Jeremy Morgan will give a talk at the Art Association.

Morgan has “created a following of dedicated artists that enjoy absorbing his knowledge and energy,” says the A.A. This public presentation offers an in-depth, personal account of Morganʼs personal artistic development, his influences and experiences.

Several of Morgan’s disciples say that one reason they love studying with him is that Morgan does not teach by insisting students emulate his own style. He encourages every artistic direction, warmly leading students towards their personal bests. For info: 307-733-6379. www.artassociation.org

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Testimony: Many’s the day I go out in the world and hear how excited folks are about Alissa Davies’ Community Supported Arts project!  That’s revealing, redeeming and couldn’t happen to a better, more balanced and sincere arts contributor. Congratulations, Alissa!  Contact Davies by phoning 307.690.4757 or by emailing csajacksonhole@gmail.com.

 

Brookover’s Cliffhanger Photogravures; Public Art Winners; New Altamira Buys

David Brookover - Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

Can you name more than one photographer creating hand-made photogravure prints — or platinum prints — in Jackson other than David Brookover? I can’t. Brookover’s photography intuition is astounding. His dedication to the finest, most painstaking forms of photography continue to pay off. And by “pay off,” I mean Brookover reaps good karma in addition to a solid record of excellent sales. David Brookover refuses to rest on his laurels. When he’s not watching over his Gaslight Alley gallery, he’s out in the field, shooting.

Far afield. Next stop: Iceland.

Brookover prints his images on the finest hand made Japanese gampi paper; back in February printmaker Jon Lybrook and Brookover gave a public presentation on the subject. In the gallery now are samples of gampi and kozo papers; these gampi sheets are likely the last the paper artisan will ever make.

IMG_2889“There’s so much work involved,” says Brookover. “It’s impossible to harvest gampi; it has to be gleaned from the forests of China and Japan.”

Downstairs at Brookover’s gallery visitors may view sensitive, educational videos on the art of paper making; spend 20 minutes watching, and the import of what this photographer has achieved will become clear.

Brookover’s latest works explore California’s tangled, ancient and atmospheric landscapes. Brookover pointed his camera at that state’s storied coastal seascapes, cypress trees, cliffs, cactus and rock formations. We know these images are taken in California, but each sweeps us up into universal chi.

David Brookover - Thermal Glide-California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Thermal Glide, California. Photogravure

It’s impossible to grasp the depth and detail of Brookover’s work here; I strongly encourage collectors and all souls interested in the art of photography to visit. See the intention of these new works for yourself. Allow your eye to peruse a cypress tree’s balance, its roots gripped to a rocky cliff. Thermal sea bird ascents and a cactus’ graphic perfection are palpable. www.brookovergallery.com

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“Three artists have been chosen as finalists in the South Cache Complete Streets Paintings & Pavers Project,” writes JH Public Art. Those artists are: Molly Dilworth of Brooklyn, NY, David Klaren of Pinedale, WY and Joshua Wiener of Boulder, CO. They will receive funds to develop creative paver concepts and street paintings on a redesigned South Cache Street.

Close to Jackson’s arts scene, David Klaren has long been a Wyoming contemporary arts activist. Klarens’ mediums range from meticulous graphite and ink drawings to large commissions in wood and concrete.

Dilworth creates outdoor site-specific, researched art. She has partnered with green building community organizations, climate change activities, arts organizations and government agencies, says J.H. Public Art.

Wiener’s large-scale sculptures can incorporate stone, steel, bronze, water, earth, concrete, sand — and asphalt. The artist works to reflect place and time in his art. www.jhpublicart.org.

Billy Schenck - You Want What? - 45x35"

Billy Schenck – You Want What? – 45×35″

Altamira Fine Art has exciting new acquisitions in their Jackson Hole Gallery. And, I’m pleased to report that all is going well at Altamira’s new Scottsdale, AZ gallery, which carries works by many of Altamira’s Jackson artists and serves the secondary contemporary Western Art market.

Ed Mell, John Nieto, Rocky Hawkins and Billy Schenck are names any Western Contemporary Art enthusiast will know; and works by these artists are now available through Altamira. Mell’s jagged, dynamic geometric landscapes, Schenck’s humorous Western Pop, American Expressionist master Nieto channeling Picasso, and Hawkins’ painterly, spiritual paintings are in the house. Click here to see all the gallery’s new works.  www.altamiraart.com 

 

Brush Art Ventures Forth; Jeremy Morgan, LOVE & Culture Front

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A new arts venture is in town. Brush Art Ventures has opened softly over the past several months, but last week founder Alison Brush threw a big party. Brush’s new enterprise is housed in a Dynia “Metro Plateau” unit, perched above Broadway, near the intersection of that throughway and Highway 22.

Bonbon 12x6x4 1500 smBrush represents a handful of regional artists, exhibiting their works at 1085 West Broadway, Unit 1123. The concept is similar to that of apartment galleries popular in major arts cities like New York: Set up an exhibition in your own space and open it up to the public. Dynia’s dynamic structures, marked by high ceilings, industrial finishes and big windows are perfect for home/public gallery space.

At Brush’s recent opening for fledgling wildlife and landscape photographer Chuck Schneebeck and sculptor Amy Unfried, the place was packed. And the crowd was new. Schneebeck’s conservation work and Unfried’s connections to Jackson’s art world at large attracted sportsmen, collectors, fishing luminaries, artists, Mr. Dynia and a host of friends. Brush Art Ventures is, in fact, a gallery. Galleries have shows, and here’s hoping Ms. Brush keeps the energy going!  Check out her website: www.brushartventures.com, to see a list of represented artists. With the departure of Culture Front salons, a hole needs to be filled. Maybe it can be filled here?

Many thanks to Ms. Brush for supplying images for this post! I took a few shots; hers are better!

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Brush happens to represent noted California artist Jeremy Morganwho opens a show Friday, Feb 28th, alongside 12 local artists, at the Art Association. Morgan will be there! Thomas Macker relays that the opening reception runs 5:30 – 7:30 pm, and will feature Morgan’s work and the work of  his dedicated students from years past. This year’s workshop, “Realism to Abstraction,” offers a fresh opportunity to study with a master right here in Jackson, says Macker. www.artassociation.org .

Jeremy Morgan - Lost Horizon

Jeremy Morgan – Lost Horizon

Robert Indiana - Love 1967 - Screenprint, 14 x 14"

Robert Indiana – Love
1967 – Screenprint, 14 x 14″

Lots of new work in at Heather James Fine Art’s Jackson gallery. Including this beauty, a classic, our generation’s big art flag: Robert Indiana’s “LOVE.”  The gallery is open this month, stop in and warm to the message!  www.heatherjames.com.

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Behind the eight ball, as they say.

In the weeks leading up to my recent getaway I was so busy putting the finishing touches on freelance assignments, writing this blog and preparing for the trip that I failed to notice Meg Daly’s news about resigning her Culture Front website and its related efforts. Her reasons for doing so are there for anyone to read on Culture Front’s blog, still live.

Daly provided fresh ways for our community to look at and think about art. So many of us vigorously participated in Culture Front’s salons at The Rose. When Daly was preparing to launch her site she had the grace to invite me to tea to talk about her vision. Many would have simply and bluntly launched, without bothering to communicate to me that a new local arts blog was on the horizon.

I won’t forget that, and I’ll miss the collaboration we shared.

Thank you, Meg. Where’s my heart emoticon?