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Posts from ‘Public Art’

Jan
23
Walter Hood

Walter Hood outlines the Sandbox Project at Jackson’s Center for the Arts. ~ T. Christel

“We’ll talk about its capacity, trees, theaters, animals, water, earth, habitat, the mountains and about the community, all within this setting.”  ~~ Walter Hood

Launching February 14th, 2014: www.sandbox.jhcenterforthearts.org! That’s where the public gets the chance to chime in on how the Center for the Arts’ ambitious back lawn landscape design project might evolve. Nationally noted urban landscape designer Walter Hood, overseeing the project in partnership with Steve Dynia, gave Jacksonites a chance to play in the sand three nights in a row; participants used specially constructed sandboxes and props to define what they envision for the open space.

“We’ll look primarily at the expanded architectural program with Steve Dynia; the sandboxes are about the landscape,” said Hood. “This is a landscape, not a park, or a garden. It’s open. We also understand that the cadence, how you move through Jackson, is a grid. This is a very urban place. We have a lot of houses, a lot of cars, a lot of parking, a lot of these issues. One of the things we hope we can do…is make the space more successful for people moving through the neighborhood. We do think Snow King can come down to us by taking back the streets and the alleys. The alleys are really important. As you move north and south through the alleys, they are beautiful. As you can see here, the alleys have been largely erased. So how can we bring back a lot of this (structural) morphology?”

Hood asked the group to consider a long list of factors as they went about their designs. The first was that this space is NOT Jackson’s Town Square, and duplicating the Square is not on the agenda. But what kind of a landscape can this open space become?

A detail of Walter Hood's landscape design for the deYoung Museum - photo by T. Christel

A detail of Walter Hood’s landscape design for the deYoung Museum – photo by T. Christel

“The Center really needs to think about its building program, its architecture. It would be great to have artists come here 24/7, to have studios where they can make art. Where would you put the building?  If I put it out there in the landscape, it’s going to have a consequence on the landscape. We’ll see how we can use architecture to make something really powerful. Some ideas are a clubhouse where people can meet, an exhibition space, a multipurpose place. We think this will be a hybrid place, with things nested in one another,” said Hood. “Cafes, other permanent and temporal spaces within the building envelope. [In the West and Jackson] there exist successful pieces of architecture that elucidate the landscape. Steve is very talented — just being down one story, look how that mountain comes out and the middle ground disappears, a beautiful thing.  How can we expand upon that?”

Ideally, artists (who aren’t already) would be inspired to make work here. Sculptural landscape is a “yes.” Programmed landscape, a “no.”  Building upon the idea of an outdoor theater, Greek or Roman, embracing or inscribing, are interesting. Multi-purpose uses that might change with the seasons, be temporary or permanent, should be considered; Hood recalled Candra Day’s constructing yurts on the lawn.

photo-2One could look at a land form and see a lot of things, Hood remarked. A child may see a playhouse, an artist a place to bang steel, a dancer a natural stage. Forms can inspire and begin to say something about the landscape—inspiring, even in mud season.

“Can we do things like add trees, and then take them away, like a clear-cut,” Hood  asked. “Think about when the snow is here, when it’s not here. Can you do something in the wintertime? It might be ice skating, it might be mud wrestling! But whatever it is, it should embrace the landscape. We also know there are residential areas on our perimeter, and when events happen some elements may have to be mitigated, like noise. Do we want to make walls, edges?”

Lastly, said Hood, how do we bring our urban grid into this space? Again, the alleys are important, as they allow possible connections to the nearby church, the mountain, and other points immediately around the Center.

In a brief Q&A, it was confirmed that the Town of Jackson owns the land and is providing the Center a long-term lease; the Town, said one representative, is “very open” to this project. When asked about how the Center might draw people from Jackson’s Town Square to the new Center space, Hood responded that the idea is in the hopper, and brainstorming was the point of these workshops.

“We’re not looking for scheme A, B or C; we simply want to draw on ideas, so we can begin to think about the space and the Center,” emphasized Hood. All ideas are great ideas!”  www.jhcenterforthearts.org

(PS: I hope Mark Berry is smiling!)

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn - photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn – photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

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Event: Lindsey Ross’s Traveling Tintype Studio

Place: The Rose/Pink Garter Theatre

Date: Thursday Jan 23, 5-10pm

Bonus: Family portraits: 5-7pm

From Lyndsay McCandless: Lindsey Ross singular, tintype portraits are the real deal: 19th century technology wet plate collodion, a photographic process popular from 1850′s-1880′s, that documented the American Civil War and America’s Western expansion. Ross uses raw materials to create the photographic emulsion on an aluminum plate. While the emulsion is still wet, Ross exposes the plate to the subject using a century old camera and prolonged exposure times. Ross develops the image in a darkroom on site; portraits appear within a minute.

Tintypes are archivally stable, so they create an instant heirloom and art object. Because the exposures are long, subjects are encouraged to relax, be still and be present as their image is made,” says McCandless. “The slow process often brings out subtle, expressive similarities between family members. Come experience this historic and beautiful process!”  For information on print prices, email lyndsayrowan@gmail.com.

ross photo

 

Jan
14

musical_notesAn opening note: Many visual arts events are posted on Facebook; I love seeing those, but if you would like to submit your project or event to the Jackson Hole Art Blog, emailing me directly works MUCH better. I’ll definitely see your announcement, and it won’t get lost in the Facebook shuffle. I’ll remember it. Don’t be shy, email me at: tammy@jacksonholearttours.com. Include all relevant details. I’m a one-person gig, and can’t get every event listed—but I want everyone to have the best chance possible. And don’t forget to send those nice, big images too. Superb.

197If you receive the Community Foundation’s emails via their Listserve, you may have noticed an individual misusing that venue to comment on J.H. Public Art projects. Whatever that person’s goal, he was going at it inappropriately, and that pretty much nulls and voids his input.

There is quite a bit going on in the world of public art here in Jackson. The 5-way project is on, and there are other new projects: the South Cache Street Custom Pavers and Street Painting Project, and another bike-related job.

South Cache first: The project’s total budget is $18,000, to be divided between pavers and painters; $15K for the former, $3,000 for the latter. There are more than a couple of definitions of “paver.” One is a paving vehicle, another is actual concrete used alongside highways and streets. Pavers can also be decorative brick drive and street surfaces. That’s what we’re talkin’ about!

J.H. Public Art writes that “selected artists will fabricate custom pavers designed to integrate into the overall paving pattern. The artist will replicate the theme and key imagery used in the pavers into two, one-color street paintings designed to highlight new crosswalks along the corridor. The budget supports design and fabrication of custom pavers and the street painting.”

Artists will work with Public Works, and Public Works will install what the artist creates. There are several ways it can work, but to make sure you’ve got the drill right, contact J.H. Public Art, or visit their website, where specs are provided.

The “Town Bike Network Education Icons Project” is essentially sign design. Budget: $4,500.

Design an “iconic” sign design series for Jackson’s signposts marking the town’s bike network. Graphics, says J.H. Public Art, “will be designed to print on 12 x 18” standard street signs using 2-4 color process. Final artwork should be submitted as vector files. The artist will design a series of 5-7 bold images that are easy to read from a distance or [while the viewer is] in motion. Graphics should identify safe practices, particular bike routes, unique features of the routes and promote educational messages sponsored by the Pathways department. School children, visitors and residents of all ages use the bike network and imagery should be easy to understand, family-friendly and promote community values.”

In other words, these signs need to be understood immediately by anyone; sign language must be universal.

Applications are due by February 3, 2014.  The web sign-in spot is www.callforentry.org.  Learn more here: http://www.jhpublicart.org/opportunities-2/

 

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

“Nick’s exquisite photographs arouse deep emotions. They inspire a sense of awe at the beauty of creation and the sacredness of life. It is almost impossible to look through his work without sensing the personalities of the beings whom he has photographed.” ~ Jane Goodall

Just when you think wildlife photography can’t get any more powerful, along comes an exhibition like “Elegy: The African Photography of Nick Brandt, 2001-2008.” Opening at the National Museum of Wildlife Art January 18th, it remains on display through August 10, 2014.

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Jan
06

Eye

Eye, yai yai~~~Happy New Year, Jackson!  It’s nice to see you again. Been visiting family and taking in the views offered up by rosy winter lake sunsets, frozen, wind-whipped pines, friends, the Yale Art Museum (try closing your eyes in there!), tasting good soul food—and now it’s time to catch up around here.

Today’s post is a warm-up, so I’ll list items from my “in box” that many of you may already know about. Or maybe, like me, you’ve been away. Here goes:

Altamira Fine Art is headed to the L.A. Art Show, 2014, January 15-19, 2014 Booth 240. Altamira artists “Billy” Schenck, Ed Mell (they got him!), R. Tom Gilleon, Glenn Dean, Rocky Hawkins and selected paintings from Fritz Scholder (1937-2005). Opening night party: 1/15/14, 8-11:00 pm.  www.altamiraart.com

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David Swift is artfully photographing high-octane performers swinging through the theater doors at the J.H.Center for the Arts. He is clearly enjoying himself! “Giddy” is the word I’d use. BTW, the New York Times recently ran a travel article on Jackson’s ski scene.  Paper edition photo captions were way off~~the scenes did not depict what the captions described, and the captions were out of order. Still, great coverage for J.H. A source tells me that story was in the NYT hopper last summer, and one special gallery they mentioned was Cayuse Western Americana. Good get. 

The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s next “Mix’d Media – Darwin’s Legacy” takes place at the museum on Thursday, January 9th, 6-9 pm. Additionally, Director of Education Jane Lavino has posted a new NMWA job opening – Part-Time Assistant Curator of Education. Check it out at   http://www.wildlifeart.org/about/employment/

exhibition-148

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works — the first to be hosted by the Center for the Arts — at the Center Theater Gallery. An Exhibit Opening takes place on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. “Interiors/Exteriors” explores the artist’s two painting styles, both highly developed. The show remains up January 13-29th, 2013. Love the promotional image, it’s like a 60′s record cover –twist and shout! More on Kosharek’s show in our next post.

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Direct from Wyoming Arts (verbatim):  The Visual Arts Fellowship application is now open! Deadline: March 10. Applications will be accepted on CaFE only (www.callforentry.com). Visual artists of all kinds, including film and video, are invited to apply. More information available in the call on CaFE or at http://wyoarts.state.wy.us/wac-grant/fellowship-for-visual-artists/. Juror information in included on the webpage. Additionally, CLICK! is coming together! Save the date for April 4-5 in Fort Washakie/Lander. Information and registration will be available mid-January. Want to know more about Wyoming Visual Arts happenings? Sign up for their list serve:  http://www.openvistas.net/sign_up.html

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Some dude is publicly persistent in his queries about  J.H. Public Art  project press releases on our community list serve. Anyone know this guy? Whatever is going on there, I’ll include that arts non-profit’s new “call for entries” information in my next post, too.

For you at this New Year, Jackson, a tiny excerpt from “All the Hemispheres,” by Sufi Poet Hafiz: Leave the familiar for a while/Let your senses and bodies stretch out/Like a welcomed season/Onto the meadows and shores and hills./Open up the roof.

 

 

 

Dec
16
September Vhay - Red Horse 477

September Vhay – Red Horse 477

Think RED. 

Away to the galleries I flew like a flash,

Burst past reception, hit the floor in a dash.

The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow,

Reflected  September Vhay’s lustrous show;

When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,

Glistening canvas, crimson swirls and Red Horses so near…

“All the Red Horses,” a show of new paintings by Jackson artist September Vhay, opens at Altamira Fine Art December 16, 2013, and an opening reception takes place Thursday, December 19, 5-7:00 pm at the gallery; Vhay gives a talk at 6:00 pm. The exhibit remains up through New Year’s Day, 2014.

Vhay will discuss the origins of her Red Horses and creativity, but the gallery has provided a sneak peek as to what Vhay may touch upon. The series began several years ago as a way for Vhay to deepen her exploration of horses’ intrinsic qualities and forms, says Altamira. Initially these paintings, based on the study of sumi-e art and abstract sculptural work, were compact. Over time, and with the added luxury of larger exhibition space, Vhay’s minimalist, contemporary red horses began appearing in larger scale. Bordering on the abstract, Vhay’s images remain proportionally true. Large and small oils on canvas, as well as watercolors on paper, comprise the show. Red on White: Vhay’s serene gestural series evokes the distillation and essence of the equine form – and the West in wintertime.  www.altamiraart.com 

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Oct
04
Elizabeth Galindo - Handmade fabric with leaves, berries and natural colors.

Elizabeth Galindo – Handmade silk jersey with leaves, berries and natural dyes.

Walking with her through high-end Berkeley and Sacramento galleries and shops, I watched my friend Elizabeth Galindo Roberts, PhD, size up designs, the cut of a fabric, color and details of exquisitely made clothing. Elizabeth, who I’ve known since childhood, creates couture. She has a right to world fame, so rare and extensive are her gifts. Even if she’s not internationally known yet, she is a highly respected artist and academic expert in her field. Sophia Loren has worn her designs. Elizabeth crafts an extraordinary line of textiles that are true products of the earth, her Botanical Peace Textiles. Constructed using flora colors, 100% natural fabrics, dyes and ingredients—such as indigenous berries and leaves—her Botanical Peace Textiles are extraordinary, romantic interpretations of nature.

Galindo Couture - Detail

Galindo Couture – Detail

A film costume researcher, Elizabeth’s credits include 2006′s “The Good Shepard,” 2007′s “There Will Be Blood,” with Daniel Day Lewis and 2006′s “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” starring Brad Pitt. Perhaps her proudest work, though, is her styling for her son’s music video—Gustavo Galindo was a 2011 Grammy nominee for Best Latin Pop, Rock, or Urban Album for his debut album “Entre La Ciudad Y El Mar.” 

Elizabeth Galindo - Silk & Wool Wall Hanging (detail)

Elizabeth Galindo – Silk & Wool Wall Hanging (detail)

Elizabeth is as busy and focused as anyone I’ve known; somewhere between our childhood and our current lives she developed an intense creativity and discerning eye. Perhaps it was always there—she had a lot to say about Barbie’s wardrobe back in the day!  Fashion is risk, and risks she took. Years living in Mexico informed her aesthetic, as did early years in Southern California. At the summer camp we attended together, Elizabeth received a coveted plaque: “Camper of the Week.” I didn’t. I came in third at the summer’s end “Activity Contest”; Elizabeth took second. She understands what it means to build a profile and get your work out into the world. Still, when I saw her creations “in the flesh” this summer, I was stunned by their exquisite beauty and passionate dedication evident in every piece.

Last year Elizabeth earned her Masters of Fine Arts and a PhD in Performance Studies with an emphasis in Film and Fashion at the University of California, Davis. She travels extensively to lecture, and she has “studied and earned several proficiency degrees in silk screening, hand blocking and embroidery work on fabrics at the Fuji Institute in Florence, Italy.” On top of it all, Elizabeth is an adjunct professor at two universities, conducting her courses on line.

Elizabeth Galindo Botanical Fabric

Elizabeth Galindo Botanical Fabric

Elizabeth has fun with fashion; she regularly posts her favorite trends and designs to social media, and her followers delight in her sense of style. Elizabeth’s ability to move back and forth between designing the finest quality, custom-fitted garments, marked by distinct detail—very time consuming to create—to melding rich, loose colors with natural elements is quite unusual and the sign of a high artist.

While visiting Elizabeth in California we spotted a sweater she advised me to buy. If I’m smart, I’ll take her advice. www.elizabethgalindo.com

Elizabeth Galindo - Bias Cut Burnt Velvet Gown

Elizabeth Galindo – Bias Cut Burnt Velvet Gown

gala.logowebLet the Good Times Roll!

A wonderful opportunity to bridge the distance between Jackson’s art scene and the University of Wyoming’s and Wyoming Arts ever-evolving, visionary arts culture is to get yourself down to U.W.’s Art Museum’s fundraising black tie Gala “Laizzes les Bons Temps Rouler!”  The event takes place Saturday, October 26th, 2013 in the Yellowstone Ballroom Wyoming Union, at U.W.  The evening’s rollicking tone will be set by the hippest band in the state, “Jackson 6.”  

All proceeds benefit the exhibition, education and collection programs at the U.W. Art Museum–a spectacular museum; its galleries remind me of San Francisco’s De Young. Sponsorship levels vary—individual tickets are $175, and there are multiple “table” opportunities.

“The Art Museum and its outreach programs not only impact the quality of life around Wyoming; the preschool through college education programs strengthen student problem-solving and critical thinking skills — a great benefit to our future workforce,” say this year’s gala chairs Chris and Kathryn Boswell.

The party starts at 6:00 pm!  Fine hors d’oeuvres, an open bar and silent auction are all part of the fun…which promises to be memorable. I would love to be there!  For information, phone 307.766.3477. Read a little bit more about the evening’s events here.