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Posts from ‘Sculpture’

Jul
06
James Castle, CAS11-0171 Untitled (black form), n.d. Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string, 6 1/4 x 8 3/8 in.

James Castle, Untitled (black form), n.d. Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string, 6 1/4 x 8 3/8 in.

In the new double show at Jackson’s Tayloe Piggott Gallery, there’s a complementary and slightly chilling collection of works by James Castle and Nicola Hicks. Castle was a profoundly deaf, self-taught artist. His mother was a midwife and his father ran the Garden Valley, Idaho post office.

James Castle, CAS09-0324 Untitled (flamingo) n.d., Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string. James Castle, CAS09-0324 Untitled (flamingo), n.d. Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string, 28 3/4 x 10 in.

James Castle, Untitled (flamingo)
n.d., Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string. Found paper, soot, color of unknown origin, string, 28 3/4 x 10 in.

Always poor, often on subsistence, Castle came to know a little sign language and developed a love for lettering. He “…is known for the skill of his draftsmanship,…subject matter and for his use of found and homemade materials. His recurrent and diverse themes tell an intimate story of a life lived in rural Idaho during the 20th century.”

Looking at Castle’s work I experience guilt as if I’ve broken into a child’s secret diary. It’s slightly agonizing, albeit fascinating, to study a Castle work; they’re heartrending. Eternally enigmatic, but with glimpses of a compromised soul’s joy in creating art. Displaying a man-child’s heart, Castle’s works seem stuffed in tiny boxes. Imagine, too, the drawings of an unborn child tucked in a dark, warm space, sensing fuzzy edges of the outside world.

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Nicola Hicks’ electric, recumbent bear prompted an email to friends much more familiar with bears’ private behavior. “Would a bear lie in this position on its own accord,” I asked. “Or would it only roll over on its back, belly exposed, if it was coerced by humans?”

Nicola Hicks, Untitled (Bear laying down), 2010 Charcoal and chalk on brown paper, 66 x 82 in.

Nicola Hicks, Untitled (Bear laying down), 2010 Charcoal and chalk on brown paper, 66 x 82 in.

Bears do lie around tummy up. “They’re like dogs,” one of my experts explained. “They can be spotted rolling around in dense forest glens or by a body of water, cooling off.”

Nicola Hicks, Owl, ed. 1/1, 2014. Monoprint, 29 3/4 x 22 1/8 in. (75.6 x 56.2 cm)

Nicola Hicks, Owl, ed. 1/1, 2014. Monoprint, 29 3/4 x 22 1/8 in. (75.6 x 56.2 cm)

All this goes along with what seems to be Hicks’ core artist statement: Creatures of the earth are “…animalistic in form and body, yet uncannily human.” She’s on the anthropomorphism train.

Hicks’ show includes plaster casts (ultimately brass sculptures) of animals—seemingly locked in suffocating, snare-like dried mud pierced by sharp objects—and works on paper. It’s tempting to grab a sledgehammer and free these entombed creatures. Something new, an exercise in “different.” Hicks’ chalk, charcoal and monoprints depict wild and domestic animals, extended and sinewy. A portrait of a big sleeping dog has real heft. You feel the weight of the animal’s massive head.

The bear wins!

The exhibition remains on display through August 16th, 2015. www.tayloepiggottgallery.com

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Katy Ann Fox, "On the Way to Breakfast." 12x12" Oil on Panel

Katy Ann Fox, “On the Way to Breakfast.” 12×12″ Oil on Panel

Together or Separate: New Works by Eleanor Anderson and Katy Ann Fox, opens at the Daly Gallery-Daly Project on Thursday, July 9, with a reception from 5-7:00pm. Anderson’s bright, whimsical ceramics and Fox’s airy, well-composed canvases are on view through July 24th.

We strive to be open Tuesday through Saturday, 1o AM to 6 PM. Or by appointment, 307-699-7933,” notes the gallery. http://www.dalyartistrep.com

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And don’t forget: Catch up with more Jackson Hole art scene goings-on by logging on to https://funthingstodoinjacksonhole.wordpress.com. This week: “Plein Air for the Park!”  

Erin C. O'Connor. On Evening's Edge. Oil on Linen.

Erin C. O’Connor. On Evening’s Edge. Oil on Linen.

Mar
31

Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at aajhsubmissions@gmail.com, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.

www.artassociation.org

Feb
25

BAV_6_Feb-21_150-e1393187376343

A new arts venture is in town. Brush Art Ventures has opened softly over the past several months, but last week founder Alison Brush threw a big party. Brush’s new enterprise is housed in a Dynia “Metro Plateau” unit, perched above Broadway, near the intersection of that throughway and Highway 22.

Bonbon 12x6x4 1500 smBrush represents a handful of regional artists, exhibiting their works at 1085 West Broadway, Unit 1123. The concept is similar to that of apartment galleries popular in major arts cities like New York: Set up an exhibition in your own space and open it up to the public. Dynia’s dynamic structures, marked by high ceilings, industrial finishes and big windows are perfect for home/public gallery space.

At Brush’s recent opening for fledgling wildlife and landscape photographer Chuck Schneebeck and sculptor Amy Unfried, the place was packed. And the crowd was new. Schneebeck’s conservation work and Unfried’s connections to Jackson’s art world at large attracted sportsmen, collectors, fishing luminaries, artists, Mr. Dynia and a host of friends. Brush Art Ventures is, in fact, a gallery. Galleries have shows, and here’s hoping Ms. Brush keeps the energy going!  Check out her website: www.brushartventures.com, to see a list of represented artists. With the departure of Culture Front salons, a hole needs to be filled. Maybe it can be filled here?

Many thanks to Ms. Brush for supplying images for this post! I took a few shots; hers are better!

BAV_3_Feb 21_150

Brush happens to represent noted California artist Jeremy Morganwho opens a show Friday, Feb 28th, alongside 12 local artists, at the Art Association. Morgan will be there! Thomas Macker relays that the opening reception runs 5:30 – 7:30 pm, and will feature Morgan’s work and the work of  his dedicated students from years past. This year’s workshop, “Realism to Abstraction,” offers a fresh opportunity to study with a master right here in Jackson, says Macker. www.artassociation.org .

Jeremy Morgan - Lost Horizon

Jeremy Morgan – Lost Horizon

Robert Indiana - Love 1967 - Screenprint, 14 x 14"

Robert Indiana – Love
1967 – Screenprint, 14 x 14″

Lots of new work in at Heather James Fine Art’s Jackson gallery. Including this beauty, a classic, our generation’s big art flag: Robert Indiana’s “LOVE.”  The gallery is open this month, stop in and warm to the message!  www.heatherjames.com.

jhculturefront_header

Behind the eight ball, as they say.

In the weeks leading up to my recent getaway I was so busy putting the finishing touches on freelance assignments, writing this blog and preparing for the trip that I failed to notice Meg Daly’s news about resigning her Culture Front website and its related efforts. Her reasons for doing so are there for anyone to read on Culture Front’s blog, still live.

Daly provided fresh ways for our community to look at and think about art. So many of us vigorously participated in Culture Front’s salons at The Rose. When Daly was preparing to launch her site she had the grace to invite me to tea to talk about her vision. Many would have simply and bluntly launched, without bothering to communicate to me that a new local arts blog was on the horizon.

I won’t forget that, and I’ll miss the collaboration we shared.

Thank you, Meg. Where’s my heart emoticon?

Jan
27

If you want your art to get noticed and sold here in Jackson, you have to work at it every day, every minute you can. Don’t sit around wasting time watching TV. Your art has to be the best, the highest caliber you can produce, it has to stand out.”  ~ Jackson Hole Artist 

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“No animals died in the making of these mounts.” – Jennifer Lee, National Museum of Wildlife Art

Contests and competitions everywhere!  Jackson’s National Museum of Wildlife Art is putting out a national and regional call to artists–including amateurs–to submit “fun faux animal mounts” that will be part of the new Trophy Art Fundraiser. Artists must create fanciful examples of animal trophy heads and deliver them to the museum by February 7, 2014. All works will be on display February 12th – March 15th. All are available for sale on a first come, first serve basis beginning February 22nd, from 11 a.m – 2 p.m., during  “Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All.”

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“We were hoping to inspire people’s creativity with this event by letting imaginations run wild,” says Associate Director of Programs and Events Jennifer Lee. “For years the museum has been asked, ‘Where is the taxidermy?’ This event offers a fun way of playing off that theme, including our tagline: “No animals died in the making of these mounts.”

Two works for sale are “Deer #5” by Kelly Vanderveer (above) and “The Lizard” crafted in silver and opal by Jackson Hole silversmith Joni Mack, top of the page.

Participating artists retain 30% of the purchase price they name as a commission for their time and efforts, with the rest of the proceeds going to the museum’s youth education programs. Images already received for the upcoming event include a lizard, mountain lion, elk, pronghorn and deer.

For more information, contact Jennifer Lee at jlee@wildlifeart.org or 307.732.5412. www.wildlifeart.org

Joshua Tobey -"Cotton Ball"  Cotton Tail Rabbit. Bronze, edition of 25 7" x 9" x 8"

Tim Cherry -“Cotton Ball” Cotton Tail Rabbit.
Bronze, edition of 25
7″ x 9″ x 8″

New paintings and sculptures are on view at Astoria Fine Art, in Jackson. In particular 2014’s Fall Arts Festival Sculptor Artist Joshua Tobey has some wonderful new wildlife sculptures. At this writing many Fall Arts fans are waiting to see the finished image of Tobey’s winning FAF work, one he hopes will initiate the new FAF tradition memorably.

Tim Cherry and Gerald Balciar also have new sculptures at the gallery; painters Ewoud deGroot, Robert Lougheed (1910 – 1982), Dean Mitchell, Tom Palmore, Al Agnew and Cole Johnson are all represented. Stop by the gallery, on the north side of Jackson’s Town Square. Who said winter was quiet?

Ewoud deGroot - "Snowy Owl"  39.5" x 25.5"  oil

Ewoud deGroot – “Snowy Owl” 39.5″ x 25.5″ oil

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Jan
23
Walter Hood

Walter Hood outlines the Sandbox Project at Jackson’s Center for the Arts. ~ T. Christel

“We’ll talk about its capacity, trees, theaters, animals, water, earth, habitat, the mountains and about the community, all within this setting.”  ~~ Walter Hood

Launching February 14th, 2014: www.sandbox.jhcenterforthearts.org! That’s where the public gets the chance to chime in on how the Center for the Arts’ ambitious back lawn landscape design project might evolve. Nationally noted urban landscape designer Walter Hood, overseeing the project in partnership with Steve Dynia, gave Jacksonites a chance to play in the sand three nights in a row; participants used specially constructed sandboxes and props to define what they envision for the open space.

“We’ll look primarily at the expanded architectural program with Steve Dynia; the sandboxes are about the landscape,” said Hood. “This is a landscape, not a park, or a garden. It’s open. We also understand that the cadence, how you move through Jackson, is a grid. This is a very urban place. We have a lot of houses, a lot of cars, a lot of parking, a lot of these issues. One of the things we hope we can do…is make the space more successful for people moving through the neighborhood. We do think Snow King can come down to us by taking back the streets and the alleys. The alleys are really important. As you move north and south through the alleys, they are beautiful. As you can see here, the alleys have been largely erased. So how can we bring back a lot of this (structural) morphology?”

Hood asked the group to consider a long list of factors as they went about their designs. The first was that this space is NOT Jackson’s Town Square, and duplicating the Square is not on the agenda. But what kind of a landscape can this open space become?

A detail of Walter Hood's landscape design for the deYoung Museum - photo by T. Christel

A detail of Walter Hood’s landscape design for the deYoung Museum – photo by T. Christel

“The Center really needs to think about its building program, its architecture. It would be great to have artists come here 24/7, to have studios where they can make art. Where would you put the building?  If I put it out there in the landscape, it’s going to have a consequence on the landscape. We’ll see how we can use architecture to make something really powerful. Some ideas are a clubhouse where people can meet, an exhibition space, a multipurpose place. We think this will be a hybrid place, with things nested in one another,” said Hood. “Cafes, other permanent and temporal spaces within the building envelope. [In the West and Jackson] there exist successful pieces of architecture that elucidate the landscape. Steve is very talented — just being down one story, look how that mountain comes out and the middle ground disappears, a beautiful thing.  How can we expand upon that?”

Ideally, artists (who aren’t already) would be inspired to make work here. Sculptural landscape is a “yes.” Programmed landscape, a “no.”  Building upon the idea of an outdoor theater, Greek or Roman, embracing or inscribing, are interesting. Multi-purpose uses that might change with the seasons, be temporary or permanent, should be considered; Hood recalled Candra Day’s constructing yurts on the lawn.

photo-2One could look at a land form and see a lot of things, Hood remarked. A child may see a playhouse, an artist a place to bang steel, a dancer a natural stage. Forms can inspire and begin to say something about the landscape—inspiring, even in mud season.

“Can we do things like add trees, and then take them away, like a clear-cut,” Hood  asked. “Think about when the snow is here, when it’s not here. Can you do something in the wintertime? It might be ice skating, it might be mud wrestling! But whatever it is, it should embrace the landscape. We also know there are residential areas on our perimeter, and when events happen some elements may have to be mitigated, like noise. Do we want to make walls, edges?”

Lastly, said Hood, how do we bring our urban grid into this space? Again, the alleys are important, as they allow possible connections to the nearby church, the mountain, and other points immediately around the Center.

In a brief Q&A, it was confirmed that the Town of Jackson owns the land and is providing the Center a long-term lease; the Town, said one representative, is “very open” to this project. When asked about how the Center might draw people from Jackson’s Town Square to the new Center space, Hood responded that the idea is in the hopper, and brainstorming was the point of these workshops.

“We’re not looking for scheme A, B or C; we simply want to draw on ideas, so we can begin to think about the space and the Center,” emphasized Hood. All ideas are great ideas!”  www.jhcenterforthearts.org

(PS: I hope Mark Berry is smiling!)

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn - photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn – photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

ross photo 9

Event: Lindsey Ross’s Traveling Tintype Studio

Place: The Rose/Pink Garter Theatre

Date: Thursday Jan 23, 5-10pm

Bonus: Family portraits: 5-7pm

From Lyndsay McCandless: Lindsey Ross singular, tintype portraits are the real deal: 19th century technology wet plate collodion, a photographic process popular from 1850’s-1880’s, that documented the American Civil War and America’s Western expansion. Ross uses raw materials to create the photographic emulsion on an aluminum plate. While the emulsion is still wet, Ross exposes the plate to the subject using a century old camera and prolonged exposure times. Ross develops the image in a darkroom on site; portraits appear within a minute.

Tintypes are archivally stable, so they create an instant heirloom and art object. Because the exposures are long, subjects are encouraged to relax, be still and be present as their image is made,” says McCandless. “The slow process often brings out subtle, expressive similarities between family members. Come experience this historic and beautiful process!”  For information on print prices, email lyndsayrowan@gmail.com.

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