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Posts from ‘Think Globally’

Feb
03
Erin C. O'Connor - Untitled

Erin C. O’Connor – Untitled

“The mission of the Atlas Cultural Foundation is to help underserved Moroccans, especially women and children, and improve their quality of life through locally determined development projects.” - Cloe Erickson, Founder

“The people are living exactly they way they have for hundreds and hundreds of years. Stone houses, sheep, goats, a very marginal existence. They are agricultural, but it’s extremely sparse terrain. You can’t truly realize how lush and beautiful it is here until you visit places like these.” – Jackson Artist Erin C. O’Connor

Even the briefest of visits to the Morocco-based  Atlas Cultural Foundation will take your breath away. People, music, swirling rainbows of cloth, smiling children, the purity of souls, laughter, donkeys loaded with grains making their way up steep mountainsides on paths as wide as piece of thread, stone houses seemingly impossible to build…African light on high cliffs, solitary townspeople under tents, illuminated by candlelight.

By Erin C. O'Connor

By Erin C. O’Connor

“These villages,” says plein air painter Erin O’Connor, “are in the High Atlas Mountains, in the middle of nowhere, at the end of a dirt road that probably should have ended 60 miles before it does. It’s unimaginable. The area was the last place for the French Foreign Legion to access, it is so remote.”

Recently O’Connor and a colleague landed the chance to go to Morocco, visit the Atlas Mountains and spend time in the ancient city of Medina, as part of an Atlas awareness-raising initiative. A Montana patron with a strong interest in the organization’s mission financed the trip. O’Connor’s paintings and works by other artists will be offered for sale on February 6th, at a private event in Bozeman, Montana.

“I’d always wanted to go to Morocco. EVERYTHING there is art: the wrought iron on the windows, the tile work, the architecture, the doors, I wanted to paint it all,” says O’Connor. “This opportunity came up,  andI had to say ‘yes.’ It was serendipitous. The funny thing is, I have always considered myself a plein air landscape painter, but being in Marrakesh, in the oldest part the Medina, 8,ooo years old, it was all small alley ways, souks (marketplaces), so many people in such a small place. I was forced to paint in really tight corners! I had two jobs every day: one was to go out and prove just how much my French sucks and the other was to get lost! You go through humbly.”

O’Connor began her trek in the Medina, where she spent almost a week on her own, painting. One day she found herself wedged up in a small souk corner, people pushing by her in huge throngs, very intense for a solitary outdoor artist.

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Jan
14

musical_notesAn opening note: Many visual arts events are posted on Facebook; I love seeing those, but if you would like to submit your project or event to the Jackson Hole Art Blog, emailing me directly works MUCH better. I’ll definitely see your announcement, and it won’t get lost in the Facebook shuffle. I’ll remember it. Don’t be shy, email me at: tammy@jacksonholearttours.com. Include all relevant details. I’m a one-person gig, and can’t get every event listed—but I want everyone to have the best chance possible. And don’t forget to send those nice, big images too. Superb.

197If you receive the Community Foundation’s emails via their Listserve, you may have noticed an individual misusing that venue to comment on J.H. Public Art projects. Whatever that person’s goal, he was going at it inappropriately, and that pretty much nulls and voids his input.

There is quite a bit going on in the world of public art here in Jackson. The 5-way project is on, and there are other new projects: the South Cache Street Custom Pavers and Street Painting Project, and another bike-related job.

South Cache first: The project’s total budget is $18,000, to be divided between pavers and painters; $15K for the former, $3,000 for the latter. There are more than a couple of definitions of “paver.” One is a paving vehicle, another is actual concrete used alongside highways and streets. Pavers can also be decorative brick drive and street surfaces. That’s what we’re talkin’ about!

J.H. Public Art writes that “selected artists will fabricate custom pavers designed to integrate into the overall paving pattern. The artist will replicate the theme and key imagery used in the pavers into two, one-color street paintings designed to highlight new crosswalks along the corridor. The budget supports design and fabrication of custom pavers and the street painting.”

Artists will work with Public Works, and Public Works will install what the artist creates. There are several ways it can work, but to make sure you’ve got the drill right, contact J.H. Public Art, or visit their website, where specs are provided.

The “Town Bike Network Education Icons Project” is essentially sign design. Budget: $4,500.

Design an “iconic” sign design series for Jackson’s signposts marking the town’s bike network. Graphics, says J.H. Public Art, “will be designed to print on 12 x 18” standard street signs using 2-4 color process. Final artwork should be submitted as vector files. The artist will design a series of 5-7 bold images that are easy to read from a distance or [while the viewer is] in motion. Graphics should identify safe practices, particular bike routes, unique features of the routes and promote educational messages sponsored by the Pathways department. School children, visitors and residents of all ages use the bike network and imagery should be easy to understand, family-friendly and promote community values.”

In other words, these signs need to be understood immediately by anyone; sign language must be universal.

Applications are due by February 3, 2014.  The web sign-in spot is www.callforentry.org.  Learn more here: http://www.jhpublicart.org/opportunities-2/

 

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

ELEPHANT WITH EXPLODING DUST © Nick Brandt, 2012, Courtesy of Hasted Kraeutler Gallery, New York

“Nick’s exquisite photographs arouse deep emotions. They inspire a sense of awe at the beauty of creation and the sacredness of life. It is almost impossible to look through his work without sensing the personalities of the beings whom he has photographed.” ~ Jane Goodall

Just when you think wildlife photography can’t get any more powerful, along comes an exhibition like “Elegy: The African Photography of Nick Brandt, 2001-2008.” Opening at the National Museum of Wildlife Art January 18th, it remains on display through August 10, 2014.

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Oct
18

 For Annie~~Eleven Years. 

Terry Tempest Williams - Courtesy Coyote Clan

Terry Tempest Williams – Courtesy Coyote Clan

“Once upon a time, when women were birds, there was the simple understanding that to sing at dawn and to sing at dusk was to heal the world through joy.” ~~Terry Tempest Williams

The Wyoming Arts Council’s annual conference came to Jackson Hole this year, and attendees were treated to a closing keynote by Terry Tempest Williams. She was intimately present, and if you were lucky enough to hear her that afternoon you’ll carry the occasion in your heart a long while.

Williams had thought to read from her latest book, “When Women Were Birds.” Instead, she chose to address a question put to her by the Wyoming Art Council’s Karen Stewart: “How have the arts affected your life?” 

"When Women Were Birds" by Terry Tempest Williams

“When Women Were Birds” by Terry Tempest Williams

Our cavernous conference room became an intimate campfire gathering. A place to hear stories, a place to have your heart stirred. Williams’ childhood summers were spent in Wyoming; in remembering those family traditions and travels, Williams said that Wyoming winds, time and the freedom of open spaces that create open minds shaped her. Days and nights spent curled up Mardy Murie’s feet, inhaling the wisdom of ages, breathing in stories, creating memory.

A trail of Wyoming art winds its way through Williams’ life. Each of her books began and ended in Wyoming. “Refuge” took its first breaths at UCross. Williams spoke of discovering works by legendary Wyoming artists like Jackson and Rungius. Her climate-themed collaboration with Jackson artists Ben Roth and Felicia Resor, “Council of Pronghorn,” elicited deep emotion (Roth drove the installation to NYC in a van, arriving just as one of the biggest storms that city has known was preparing to land. Roth had never been to NYC, and he found the streets empty. He was, said Williams, a messenger.) She reminded us that the best literary art is local; Hemingway, Faulkner—it’s all about place. We migrate, but ultimately we are a place-based species. Wyoming artist Neltje’s fluid brushstrokes inspired Williams to sweep her own sumi brushstrokes across blank paper before beginning any book.

Literature will always matter, Williams said, and art has always been waking us up. Early in her writing career, a mentor encouraged Williams to “sharpen her writing pencil,” to boldly speak about the essential nature of beauty and art in our lives.

“My wish for art education is that it continue to be taught. Arts create wholesome citizens, and we should weave art into other education disciplines and institutions. Conversation and the arts can lead to policy, and government should support the arts with no strings attached, no censorship. Trust artists; what they create is part of the roots of free speech,” Williams told the audience.

Neltje - Audible Breath Triptych - Acrylic

Neltje – Audible Breath Triptych – Acrylic

The Wyoming Arts Council blogged on Williams’ “Weather Report” project, a series of meetings Williams took with UW students and students around the state gathering and sharing stories of what it is like to live in Wyoming; to talk, as Williams described it this week, about “What keeps you up at night? What is your own ‘weather report?’ “

As Boomerang reporter Eve Newman wrote: “The energy boom in Wyoming means watching development taking over open spaces. It means jobs that keep families together. It means oil and gas executives feeling vilified. It means dead cottonwoods across ranch land.

Wyoming Arts Logo - Detail

Wyoming Arts Logo – Detail

Every Wyoming resident has a story about living in Wyoming. For many, those stories have to do with the latest boom cycle and the unprecedented change that’s affecting the land and the people. For others, their stories are about displacement, loss, love, racism, isolation, tolerance or opportunity.”

Newman also quoted Williams as saying that she believed students were able to bear witness to the power of stories, and heard the force of their own voices.

At the Aspen Institute, Williams participated in the Story Swap Project, an international interaction of citizens telling one another their stories, swapping roles, and building “bridges of understanding.”

Throughout her WAC keynote, Williams’ voice captured our hearts and minds. Throughout, she remained emotional, excited, open, receiving. We received. I know no other writers as eminent as Williams possessing an instinct to share so unselfishly, or who provide such lasting gifts inside an hour’s lecture. We are grateful.

“Once upon a time, when women were birds….”

Dove

 

Aug
07
Lee Carlman Riddell

Lee Carlman Riddell

Lee Carlman Riddell has always loved drawing, painting and outdoor adventures. For 23 years she and her husband, photographer Ed Riddell, marketed outdoor adventure and tourism businesses in their former lives as the owners of Riddell Advertising where they produced countless books, trail guides and posters for the Grand Teton Association; they share similar histories with other great American national parks. Now, setting up her easel offers a time of concentration on shapes, textures and colors as Lee paints the landscapes she loves. Join her as she executes her second “Artist in Residency” in Grand Teton National Park, August 12-17 from 1-5 pm each day, at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center.

“I wanted my time there to be interactive with visitors, so we used some ‘How To Draw Animals’ books that the Grand Teton Association (GTA) offers for sale,” says Riddell. “We set up a table with six spaces for people of all ages to draw and paint watercolors in July. It was a huge success, and we plan on doing the same thing this month.” Kids can also sit on boulders outside the Center, she says, and she admires the GTA’s excellent selection of appropriate books and related items reflecting the Park’s beauty.

Grand Teton National Park and my connections to it have profoundly influenced my life. I met Ed because he loved the Park and managed to find a position as the first marketing director of Teton Science School in the fall of 1974. We met there.” says Riddell.

Lee Carlman Riddell - Buck Mountain

Lee Carlman Riddell – Buck Mountain

Spending time at the Visitors Center holds great meaning; board members for 12 years, she and Ed participated in the building’s site selection, the choice of an architect and exhibit design team, and multiple aspects of construction. Ed helped visualize the concept for the in-ground river videos inside the Center. The Riddells now serve on the Resource Council for the Foundation; Lee Riddell’s wish to “give back” to the park she loves so much continues.

A young artist at work - Courtesy Lee Carlman Riddell

A young artist at work – Courtesy Lee Carlman Riddell

“To now have the privilege of being the GTA Artist-in-Residence for two weeks this summer is like coming full circle,” says Riddell. “I have truly enjoyed spending time there, seeing how people engage with the Park staff, move through the exhibits and respond to the ambient sounds of bird calls during quieter moments at the Center. Visitors tell me that the Center is so cool!”

Riddell and visitors never tire of the Center’s streaming light and huge windows affording sweeping views of the Tetons, the tactile animal fur exhibits and quotes by writers, artists and philanthropists deeply connected to place. Riddell is a former partner in Trio Fine Art, teaches painting, and continues her work as one of the finest graphic designers in our region. Her beautiful paintings can be found at the exclusive showroom of WRJ Associates, in downtown Jackson. www.leeriddell.com    

Wendell Field

Wendell Field

When an elderly Laos physician observed painter Wendell Field at work, the doctor remarked: “Ah, an artist. The artist is never a prisoner of society.” The remark echoes Field’s artistic philosophy and path. Saturday, August 10th, Field becomes the latest “Artist in the Environment,” painting en plein air at the historic Cunningham Cabin in Grand Teton National Park. Field will paint 2:00-5:00 pm, and as always, “Artists in the Environment” is free and open to the public.  

Whether he interprets it this way, I’m not certain; but the view has been expressed that Field’s solitary yurt habitat lifestyle is similar to that of the pioneer J.Pierce Cunningham’s. His cabin—slowly sinking into the landscape, living out its natural life—is historically marked, and one of the few remaining homesteads in the valley that date from the 1880′s. Field is inspired by world cultures—he’s painted and created exquisite prints of Himalayan villages;  his views of Snow King and our town resemble his Tibetan paintings. The spirit never deserts him. And all the YOUNG single ladies love Wendell!

“A landscape translated through the painter’s hand may remind us of a stillness lost within ourselves,” says Field. Cunningham Cabin Historic Site is north of Jackson on highways 26/89/191; take the first turnout on the left just beyond Triangle X Ranch. “Artists in the Environment” is presented by the Grand Teton Association, always connecting people, art and the Park.  www.grandtetonpark.org 

wendellfield

Remy Milosky - Couch Man

Remy Milosky – Couch Man

Young Jackson contemporary artist (he’s alive, he’s painting and it’s new!) Remy Milosky hangs his first solo exhibition, featuring over 100 original oil paintings and drawings, at Intencións Gallery, Jackson, WY.  Here’s the catch: Milosky’s exhibition, “Art is Life,” literally showcases ALL the artist’s work created these past five years, and the show runs ONLY one night, August 10th, 6-10:00 pm. 

As a child the artist promised himself to create one piece of art a day—-I don’t know Milosky’s age, but if a life retrospective were at hand it would fill every nook and corner of Jackson! Enough work exists from the past five years for a very big show.

The artist’s goal is simple and straightforward: to give everyone who visits the opportunity to own original art. Reasonable prices, diversity of subject and style should mean that there is something for everyone. “I have always dreamt of [my first] solo show, and by allowing me my own terms, Intencións is helping me fulfill this dream,” says Milosky. For more information, email madelinef.ashley@gmail.com OR remymilosky@gmail.com.  Phone contacts:  307-690-2409 and 307-690-6545. Website:  www.remysart.com

Through December, filmmaker Valerie Schramm hosts “Movie Night at the Library,” 7-9:00 pm every second Friday of the month. Each film showcases a new release from the Film Movement, a curator and distributer for award-winning films from festivals around the world. Post-film discussions. Friday, August 9th, “Shun Li and the Poet,” a drama directed by Andrea Segre, will screen. Italian and Mandarin; not sure about subtitles!  Free.  www.tclib.org

 

 

 

Jun
13


One of the newly minted Teton County Lodging Tax’s funding recipients is Jackson Hole’s 2012 Fire Festival, a week-long acknowledgment and celebration of mountain cultures from around the world. The festival is described by organizers as a “solstice party of cultural and arts events, celebrating the natural world of our valley, Japanese-style.” June 14 – 20, 2012,  Jackson’s community and its visitors may experience and take part in such activities as Japanese drumming, film screenings, festival markets and dance performances. Ooh, and sake tasting!  The week’s finale is a torch lighted, street fair Japanese fire ceremony.

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