Category Archives: Wildlife

Painting to Listen; John Potter’s Dream

John Potter “Walking Tall in the Beartooths,” Oil 7×10″

“Painting for me is a form of communication with our Creator, and of gratitude as well; for the life and beauty brought forth on this Earth, especially in our remaining wild places. Because of this, I feel a sense of responsibility for the privilege of painting, for the gift of the craft. Many painters are out there trying to be heard – I paint to listen.” – John Potter

Stay tuned, please, for this important message.

Plein air painter John Potter doesn’t reside in Jackson Holehe’s a Montana man and an Ojibwe. But his presence here is strong. He has many deep friendships, and though he doesn’t like to be the center of attention, his clear spirit, gorgeous paintings, humor, consideration, and deep connection to Nature often make him so. He dedicates his life to celebrating the land and what it provides.

Unfortunately, all too often Nature’s voice falls on deaf ears, even when calling out to us with all its majestic power. We urgently need to practice listening. We need to hear those who Nature has chosen to pass on its messages, and messages often appear as dreams.

Recently, Potter had an apocolyptic dream; a nightmare. He’s graciously given permission to share it with you. Potter’s dream is Mother Earth (She is simply the mother; there is nothing separate from her. All things come from her, return to her, and are her.- Encyclopedia Britannica) calling us to bear witness.

Miigwetch, John.

John Potter, “Walking Among Giants.” Oil 14×48″

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Fresh Lots at J.H. Art Auction; A Kansas Art Tale

Edgar Payne, Navajo Scouting Party, 24×38″ Oil. Estimate: $400,000 – $600,000

Fresh to the art market: no matter how important an artist’s work, if passed around the auction circuit too often, its value tarnishes. Flip city. That’s why the 2017 Jackson Hole Art Auction   elation over works new to the market is understandable: six oils by American illustrator W.H.D. Koerner. The works come straight from a private collection “with direct descent from the artist.”

W.H.D. Koerner (1878–1938) Citizens of the Law (1931) oil on canvas, 30 x 36″  Estimate: $75,000–$125,000

Koerner works include “Citizens of the Law,” shown above, and “New Horizons,” a “classic pioneer scene.” Both works estimate at $75,000 – $125,000. Koerner’s “Fly Fishing,” “The Bullring,” “The Price of the Old Northwest,” and “Indian Territory Demand for Tribute” round out the Koerner lots. Together these works comprise a vivid and compelling profile of the characters, times, challenges and passions of the Old West.

Edgar Payne, Carl Rungius, Robert Bateman, Tucker Smith; you’ll find works by all these iconic Western artists on the Jackson Hole Art Auction website.   No matter where they set up their easels, countless contemporary artists list the great Edgar Payne as a significant influence in their own work. 

The Jackson Hole Art Auction caps Jackson’s annual Fall Arts Festival, and is a co-production of the Gerald Peters and Trailside Galleries. A phenomenal Western Art market success, this will be the auction’s 11th year offering the finest works by living and deceased masters. The auction, now a destination in itself, continues to invite fine art consignments. Once again, the auction takes place over the course of two consecutive days: September 15th and 16th, 2017, at the Center for the Arts in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. For information, contact Auction Coordinator Madison Webb, via Tel: 866-549-9278 | Fax: 307-732-1600 or at www.jacksonholeartauction.com.  

Now, a brief “return from vacation” note. If you read the New York Times  Arts Section, you may have seen March 25th’s article “Arts Without Funding? It Can Be Done, Kansas Says.” 

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Journalist Mitch Smith’s  article tells the story of Kansas’ Hays Arts Council. Its director, Brenda Meder, cuts corners wherever possible in order to save money and funnel cash into the arts. She scrubs the toilets, she makes the reception appetizers, she’s increased membership and organizes quarterly art walks “in the brick-paved downtown, where storefronts transform into makeshift galleries that draw hundreds of spectators from Hays and beyond.”

In Hays, support comes from Democrats and Republicans. It is, says one politically involved citizen, “part of our DNA here. And that’s hard to replicate in other communities.”

This is a story about a Midwest arts community making concessions, but their arts scene remains strong. It’s a great profile. And, man, look at this art! It’s fantastic! Read the story here.

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Well Done, “Wallpaper!”; Sanders and McCauley at Altamira-Scottsdale

Art by Travis Walker

After a long winter’s lull, Spring is around the corner. If you can’t feel it in the air, you can feel it in Jackson’s art scene. In the past two weeks, art happenings popped up like crocus in 50- degree weather!

Teton Art Lab’s “Wallpaper” show was extraordinary. The Lab’s combination gallery-and-artists’ work space packed up like sardines for the show, and by the time I arrived at least two-thirds of the art had sold.

You might as well call it “The Red Dot Show.”

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Kathryn Mapes Turner Meets Winter 2017

Kathryn Mapes Turner, “Dance,” 48 x 48″.

Kathryn Mapes Turner, of Trio Fine Art, grew up in Grand Teton National Park on her family’s Triangle X Ranch. She’s arguably experienced just about everything a Jackson Hole winter can throw out there.

But, says the artist, there is winter…and there is THIS winter. With little sun, high winds, frigid temperatures and hundreds of inches of snowfall, even this valley veteran turned to accessing her imagination in lieu of accessing 15-foot high snow berms.

“Winters are always magical,” says Turner. “A typical winter brings peace and solitude; it’s a time to scale back, explore internal creative impulses, and ‘save up’ for summer when once again I’ll be able to respond to the sublime stimulation and inspiration of painting out in the field.”

“It’s all made me think back on my anthropology studies. We explored how the arts flourished in communities that had their basic needs met as opposed to communities that didn’t.”

Endlessly fascinating are the transformations snow and ice bring. Winter turns the outdoors into a dream world, simplifying landscapes, paring it down to essentials. But this winter, Turner admits her soul was not buoyed by her favorite winter activity, skiing.

Kathryn Mapes Turner, “Teton Sunrise.”

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A Wolf Walked Into a Bar: Photographer David Yarrow at WRJ

David Yarrow, The Wolf of Main Street  Hahnemühle photo rag Baryta paper

“I have worked a great deal in two ghost towns in Montana. The result has been conceptual staged shots which have proved hugely popular in America. I wanted to capture the visual feast represented by the old Wild West. The images require a double take in terms of the proximity of man and animal. I love to tell stories that ask questions with no consensual answer.” ~ David Yarrow

There are wolves in Yellowstone. There are wolves in Grand Teton National Park, on the National Elk Refuge, and in Rafter J!

And now there’s a wolf walking down a bar, looking for you.

David Yarrow, Hello 56 x 91″  Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta Paper

Wildly popular European photographer David Yarrow has a new exhibition opening at WRJ Design in Jackson, Wyoming. Dramatic and startling, Yarrow’s “The Most Amazing View” will be on view, open to the public, at WRJ’s King Street showroom February 20 – March 4, 2017. Visions West, Jackson’s newest art venue, partnered with WRJ to bring Yarrow’s internationally raved-about photography to our region.

My premonition: Visitors, prepare for goosebumps. You will walk into surprisingly wild and engulfing new territory. Around every corner, in front of you and behind you, animals of the world feel within reach.

Yarrow believes what his muse, the war photographer Robert Capa felt: If your pictures aren’t good enough, you’re not close enough.”

This exhibit goes hand-in-hand with WRJ’s acclaimed history of mounting some of the world’s most stunning exhibits; the count includes more than 40 just for Sotheby’s New York. WRJ plans on transforming their showroom, pairing Yarrow’s photographs with carefully selected furniture, fabrics and lighting to showcase Yarrow’s work. Plan on learning a thing or two about the juxtaposition of good interior design and large-scale artwork.

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