Category Archives: Workshops

Borbay Ski Barre Pop-Up! ; A.A. Teams Up with Teton Photo Group

Borbay with “Carlos Danger.” He’s not cold, he’s cool.

Picture this: An art event at a dance and fitness studio on the West Bank, featuring a young artist who discovered Jackson Hole when a patron flew him out here, flipped the young artist’s heart over enough times that he pulled up his Manhattan stakes and moved to these here hills.

Teton hills, that is. Real mountains. Rockies. Snow.

These mountains swing! And that explains how our young art hero, Borbay, is mounting his own pop-up art show and party at the swank Ski Barre on the West Bank, in Wilson, Wyoming, on March 4th, 7-9:00 pm. 

On his very own blog, Borbay weaves the tale:

“It began as… the sun was setting behind the Teton Mountains. A late summer chill descended upon the crowd, patiently witnessing a gentleman exhume, skin and dismember a lamb.  Soon, the performance became a barbecue. Huddling around a large fire spit, I turned to my left, extended a hand and introduced myself to David and Michelle Quinn. We discussed art, life and promised to continue the conversation over dinner. As our friendship blossomed, our circle expanded to include Avi Kantor, David’s partner, and Rachel Kantor, the owner of Ski Barre. On a freezing night in Victor, Idaho — we decided to collaborate on something special — a happening of our own. And so…

Borbay, “Old Town Bar”

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Painting for Portrait Lovers; Art Fair Ahoy!

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Adam Clague, “Judy.” Oil on gesso. 12×12″

“Judy” is a beautiful, sensitive, strong portrait. Immediately, the viewer sees who this person is, intuits her personality, feels her pride and senses her values.

Portrait painters Adam Clague and Amy Karnes are hosting a three-day portrait paintng workshop at the National Musuem of Wildlife Art, September 5-7th, 8:00 am – 4:00 pm each day, in Jackson, Wyoming

“Join us as we share the valuable [artistic] principles necessary [to know in order to] paint realistic portraits and build powerful figurative compositions,” says Jackson-based artist Karnes. The pair are confident that no matter how adept an artist’s figurative skills may be, they’ll improve with this workshop.

Adam Clague, Detail from "Sweet and Savory." Sold.

Adam Clague, Detail from “Sweet and Savory.” Sold.

Claugue, a Kansas City artist, began painting portraits when, on a whim, he entered a painting of some soup cans in a state fair and took first prize. At school, Clauge became so adept at portraiture that he also began teaching art. Checking his website, it’s clear that Clauge’s devotion to spiritual faith plays a strong role in his work. Realizing this, you understand his bent for perfection in reproducing Nature and the human form on canvas.

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Get Your Art Up and OUT; Cayuse’s Centennial

Borbay and Friend

Borbay and Friend

What percentage of artists working in Jackson Hole have pierced their immediate circle of collectors and taken their art to a new level? Branding happens when you’ve “arrived,” and nobody is a brand before that leap. Jackson’s art market is one of the strongest in the nation, recognized primarily for its historical and contemporary Western Art.

What if you’re not a native Westerner? What if you’ve moved here looking for answers, searching for a supportive venue? Perhaps you’ve been here forever, respected and recognized. Still, the art world at large doesn’t quite know it, and you’re not a household name. You’re selling, but you want to sell more. No sugar daddies (or mommies) around, no private plane connections, no trust fund….Maybe you’re shy.

 Just as an improved diet and better sleep will elevate health… so too can artists empower themselves by embracing necessary entrepreneurial techniques. Competition between artists for collectors is unnecessary. ~ Borbay

Borbay and Friends to the resue!

On Friday, July 29th, 1:30 – 3:00 pm at the Art Association’s Gallery, Borbay, Ben Roth and Claudia Bueno will talk on the topic “How to Get Your Work Beyond Jackson Hole.” The session is free. Heck, I wish I could be there!

 

Claudia Bueno

Claudia Bueno

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Testimonies: Teton Photography Group; Jeremy Morgan & CSA

Photograph by Nelson

Photograph by Loren Nelson

“Basic Digital Photography: How to Make Better Photographs With Your Digital Camera” is the second public educational symposium being offered by the Teton Photography Group, a group that’s come to include roughly 220 members, a phenomenal membership for an arts group less than a year old or for ANY non-profit group in a town our size! Photography, plentiful as sagebrush and as venerable as plein air, will become an official part of summer arts programs for the first time during the 2014 season.

Photograph by Linsdau

Photograph by Aaron Linsdau

“Education, sharing and networking” are the methods Teton Photography uses to advance the art. The event takes place Saturday, March 22, 2014 in the Black Box Theater at the Center for the Arts in Jackson, Wyoming. A half-day in length, the session runs 8:30 am  – 1:30 pm.

Photographers (check links for more about each artist) Loren NelsonAaron Linsdau, Michael Cohen and Mike Cavaroc will speak on such topics as basic photography gear, improving focus and sharpness, obtaining the best exposure and composition techniques that work. Beginners and intermediates should enjoy this session, which is open to the public, interactive and hands-on.

I don’t have written testimonies handy, but I could count on four hands the number of times Teton Photography members have described their own positive experiences gained from the group. $25 donation for advance reservations and $30 at the door. Call 307.733.6379 to register. www.tetonphotographygroup.org

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We mentioned this event a few weeks ago in a previous post on Alison Brush’s new arts ventures, but as it’s upon us, I’ll remind you all again that on Thursday, March 20th, 5-7 pm, noted San Francisco artist and visiting teacher Jeremy Morgan will give a talk at the Art Association.

Morgan has “created a following of dedicated artists that enjoy absorbing his knowledge and energy,” says the A.A. This public presentation offers an in-depth, personal account of Morganʼs personal artistic development, his influences and experiences.

Several of Morgan’s disciples say that one reason they love studying with him is that Morgan does not teach by insisting students emulate his own style. He encourages every artistic direction, warmly leading students towards their personal bests. For info: 307-733-6379. www.artassociation.org

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Testimony: Many’s the day I go out in the world and hear how excited folks are about Alissa Davies’ Community Supported Arts project!  That’s revealing, redeeming and couldn’t happen to a better, more balanced and sincere arts contributor. Congratulations, Alissa!  Contact Davies by phoning 307.690.4757 or by emailing csajacksonhole@gmail.com.

 

Brush Art Ventures Forth; Jeremy Morgan, LOVE & Culture Front

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A new arts venture is in town. Brush Art Ventures has opened softly over the past several months, but last week founder Alison Brush threw a big party. Brush’s new enterprise is housed in a Dynia “Metro Plateau” unit, perched above Broadway, near the intersection of that throughway and Highway 22.

Bonbon 12x6x4 1500 smBrush represents a handful of regional artists, exhibiting their works at 1085 West Broadway, Unit 1123. The concept is similar to that of apartment galleries popular in major arts cities like New York: Set up an exhibition in your own space and open it up to the public. Dynia’s dynamic structures, marked by high ceilings, industrial finishes and big windows are perfect for home/public gallery space.

At Brush’s recent opening for fledgling wildlife and landscape photographer Chuck Schneebeck and sculptor Amy Unfried, the place was packed. And the crowd was new. Schneebeck’s conservation work and Unfried’s connections to Jackson’s art world at large attracted sportsmen, collectors, fishing luminaries, artists, Mr. Dynia and a host of friends. Brush Art Ventures is, in fact, a gallery. Galleries have shows, and here’s hoping Ms. Brush keeps the energy going!  Check out her website: www.brushartventures.com, to see a list of represented artists. With the departure of Culture Front salons, a hole needs to be filled. Maybe it can be filled here?

Many thanks to Ms. Brush for supplying images for this post! I took a few shots; hers are better!

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Brush happens to represent noted California artist Jeremy Morganwho opens a show Friday, Feb 28th, alongside 12 local artists, at the Art Association. Morgan will be there! Thomas Macker relays that the opening reception runs 5:30 – 7:30 pm, and will feature Morgan’s work and the work of  his dedicated students from years past. This year’s workshop, “Realism to Abstraction,” offers a fresh opportunity to study with a master right here in Jackson, says Macker. www.artassociation.org .

Jeremy Morgan - Lost Horizon

Jeremy Morgan – Lost Horizon

Robert Indiana - Love 1967 - Screenprint, 14 x 14"

Robert Indiana – Love
1967 – Screenprint, 14 x 14″

Lots of new work in at Heather James Fine Art’s Jackson gallery. Including this beauty, a classic, our generation’s big art flag: Robert Indiana’s “LOVE.”  The gallery is open this month, stop in and warm to the message!  www.heatherjames.com.

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Behind the eight ball, as they say.

In the weeks leading up to my recent getaway I was so busy putting the finishing touches on freelance assignments, writing this blog and preparing for the trip that I failed to notice Meg Daly’s news about resigning her Culture Front website and its related efforts. Her reasons for doing so are there for anyone to read on Culture Front’s blog, still live.

Daly provided fresh ways for our community to look at and think about art. So many of us vigorously participated in Culture Front’s salons at The Rose. When Daly was preparing to launch her site she had the grace to invite me to tea to talk about her vision. Many would have simply and bluntly launched, without bothering to communicate to me that a new local arts blog was on the horizon.

I won’t forget that, and I’ll miss the collaboration we shared.

Thank you, Meg. Where’s my heart emoticon?