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Mar
31

Gilbert_Stuart_Williamstown_Portrait_of_George_Washington“Strive not with your superiors in argument, but always submit your judgment to others with modesty.” ~ George Washington

A recent article in the Jackson Hole News & Guide reported that four Art Association board members had resigned due to a lack of transparent leadership, a culture marked by economic emphasis and a muddy sense of creative direction. The fallout, now very public, occurred over a plan to relocate a portion of the Art Association’s operations to an empty Powderhorn Mall retail space. Board Chairman Dave Muskat reportedly attempted to push the move through quickly, without fully consulting board and staff. Though the books have balanced out under the current administration, it hasn’t been enough to stifle frustration.

When I read the article and Facebook comments about all this, I admit to reacting strongly. My long-standing respect and affection for the Art Association is real; so is the pain over watching it pass through such troubles. For years the Association has been reformatting its economic model and re-imagining what it wants to be to the community. All non-profits are businesses. They need to make money. But they also need to sustain a viable, dynamic mission. In a community our size, they need to generate authentic good will.

Partnering with another local arts group could make a difference. One prominent organization not only reaches out to Jackson’s community; it reaches out to tourism and a world audience. The University of Wyoming’s museum combines exciting contemporary and historically-themed exhibitions and teaching with programs that energize Laramie’s community.

The worst thing a leader can do to an organization’s image is publicly bad mouth colleagues and essentially tell everyone: “So what?” Once it’s out there, that sentiment can easily boomerang. Artists work mightily to move arts forward, and this latest development makes that effort more difficult. A value is owed to any organization’s supporters, whether those supporters offer hard financial assistance, volunteerism, positive word-of-mouth, or any other form of patronage. The Association has some new, very smart board members. I wish them all the luck in rejuvenating one of Jackson’s most important arts non-profits. With any luck recently department board members will be able to contribute their time and talents to the Association once again.

Submitted with modesty & good will ~~~ TC

528Here’s some support: The Art Association’s “JURIED METALS EXHIBITION: SOLDER, RIVET, WELD”  issued an open call for entries. Opening May 30th, 2014, the show will highlight new metalworks that utilize myriad metal fabrication techniques: casting, lampworking, metal clay, beading, metalsmithing, blacksmithing and welding.

Submission Deadline: Midnight MST, Monday April 28th, 2014 | Exhibition: May 30th – June 27th, 2014. Submission fee is $35. 

John E. Simms & "Bison Bison." Steel. 1992

John E. Simms & “Bison Bison.” Steel. 1992

“All work must be ready for installation. Work may be very small to large, but must be able to fit through a standard door. Work may be pedestal, wall hanging, or ceiling hung. Small jewelry pieces should have their own display form or case,” write the show’s organizers. This juried show will be judged by John Simms, Katherine Donan & Sam Dowd. Three wonderful choices!

Guidelines and instructions are lengthy, but you can find out everything you need to know by contacting Thomas Macker at aajhsubmissions@gmail.com, with the word “Metal Submission” in the subject field.

www.artassociation.org

Mar
25

 

NMWAStaycation-animalsMergedcopy.145648

Vacation, all I ever wanted; Vacation, have to get away~~Love that song, but I can’t find a video of Belinda Carlisle actually sounding GOOD singing that song. Hmm.

“Staycation!” If you’re having one of those, and Hill Climb vroom-vroom reverberates endlessly in your brain, escape. The National Museum of Wildlife Art is a nice place to visit. Friends and I recently enjoyed a terrific gallery talk on art’s “conservation” timeline. How did artists understand the concept of conservation in Darwin’s era, and how do they understand it now? You may be up on the subject, but listening to an excellent talk on the works comprising “Darwin’s Legacy,” all the way to Carl Rungius work and provided fresh knowledge.

Image from January, 2014's NMWA "Mix'd Media" Event

Image from January, 2014’s NMWA “Mix’d Media” Event

One woman, well versed on the topics of wildlife migration, habitat and wildlife art history, kept interrupting our guide. Without bothering to raise her hand she repeatedly cut into the lecture. DON’T do that, people! Despite her static, we thoroughly enjoyed the talk, which was simultaneously informal and informative.

The museum’s next “First Sunday” event takes place April 6, 11am – 5pm. Entry is free, and the public can “can step outside their everyday experience,” watch wildlife-themed films and explore the galleries.

“With exhibitions displaying larger than life depictions of lions, tigers and cheetahs, and films that include cougar tracking in Jackson’s own Tetons backyard, our April ‘First Sundays’ program offers a sort of exotic getaway right here in Jackson Hole,” says Director of Programming and Exhibitions Becky Kimmel. “Films on view include “North America: Born to be Wild,” a journey through some of the exotic wildlife at large in North American backyards; “American Cougar,”  taking a look at Panthera’s Teton Cougar Project and “Animal Odd Couples.”  The latter film delves into entertaining and affecting cross-species relationships. Films are shown courtesy of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival. 

The night we visited, we witnessed at least 50 deer grazing the museum’s dusty, windblown bluffs. Miraculous!  www.wildlifeart.org

Robert Batema -Rocky Wilderness Cougar - Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

Robert Bateman – Rocky Wilderness Cougar – Collection National Museum of Wildlife Art

The National Museum of Wildlife Art has issued a statement regarding the institution’s adopted strategic plan. Details should be available in a few months, but for now you can plan on the museum continuing to work to build financial stability and a strong endowment, further develop its permanent collection and create high-quality visitor experiences.

Perhaps most interestingly, a reallocation of building space will occur. “Trustees, staff and volunteers have engaged in several planning exercises to address particular elements of the strategic plan, and the Museum has engaged architects and other planning and programming professionals to determine the feasibility of particular elements,” says the museum. “The Board of Trustees will discuss all the current components of the strategic plan at their forthcoming retreat and board meeting in May.”

 

 

Mar
17
Photograph by Nelson

Photograph by Loren Nelson

“Basic Digital Photography: How to Make Better Photographs With Your Digital Camera” is the second public educational symposium being offered by the Teton Photography Group, a group that’s come to include roughly 220 members, a phenomenal membership for an arts group less than a year old or for ANY non-profit group in a town our size! Photography, plentiful as sagebrush and as venerable as plein air, will become an official part of summer arts programs for the first time during the 2014 season.

Photograph by Linsdau

Photograph by Aaron Linsdau

“Education, sharing and networking” are the methods Teton Photography uses to advance the art. The event takes place Saturday, March 22, 2014 in the Black Box Theater at the Center for the Arts in Jackson, Wyoming. A half-day in length, the session runs 8:30 am  – 1:30 pm.

Photographers (check links for more about each artist) Loren NelsonAaron Linsdau, Michael Cohen and Mike Cavaroc will speak on such topics as basic photography gear, improving focus and sharpness, obtaining the best exposure and composition techniques that work. Beginners and intermediates should enjoy this session, which is open to the public, interactive and hands-on.

I don’t have written testimonies handy, but I could count on four hands the number of times Teton Photography members have described their own positive experiences gained from the group. $25 donation for advance reservations and $30 at the door. Call 307.733.6379 to register. www.tetonphotographygroup.org

Lost-Horizon-15x30-_____-sm-1

We mentioned this event a few weeks ago in a previous post on Alison Brush’s new arts ventures, but as it’s upon us, I’ll remind you all again that on Thursday, March 20th, 5-7 pm, noted San Francisco artist and visiting teacher Jeremy Morgan will give a talk at the Art Association.

Morgan has “created a following of dedicated artists that enjoy absorbing his knowledge and energy,” says the A.A. This public presentation offers an in-depth, personal account of Morganʼs personal artistic development, his influences and experiences.

Several of Morgan’s disciples say that one reason they love studying with him is that Morgan does not teach by insisting students emulate his own style. He encourages every artistic direction, warmly leading students towards their personal bests. For info: 307-733-6379. www.artassociation.org

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Testimony: Many’s the day I go out in the world and hear how excited folks are about Alissa Davies’ Community Supported Arts project!  That’s revealing, redeeming and couldn’t happen to a better, more balanced and sincere arts contributor. Congratulations, Alissa!  Contact Davies by phoning 307.690.4757 or by emailing csajacksonhole@gmail.com.

 

Mar
12

Yee haw!  The Jackson Hole Center for the Arts and 1391805197_1Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum are putting on “A Western Winter’s Eve,” a night of music, dancing and fun — and Jen Ten filmmaking — at the Center’s lobby and theater this Friday, March 14th. Tix are $15, on sale now at the Center.  Here’s the schedule:

6 – 7:30pm | Two-step to The Stagecoach Band Live in the Lobby with dance instruction by Dancers’ Workshop

7:30 – 8:30pm | See The “The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads” on the BIG SCREEN

8:30pm – 10:30pm | Disco on Center Stage after the film, boogie down with The Spartan from WYOBASS

The night’s festivities is, they say, the FINAL opportunity to see  “The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads” on the big screen in Jackson. Tennican, the woman behind the film, is also debuting a new short film. “The Stagecoach” is going national, to be distributed by American Public Television.

“Creating this film was a community effort with over 200 individuals, foundations and businesses supporting the JHHSM’s project through tax-deductible donations,” say the evening’s producers. The Stagecoach Band, great food, and dancing (for pro and non-pro two-steppers) is all part of the fun. Costumes encouraged, but not required!  Check it out on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/events/389756964493047

Courtesy Wyoming Arts. Photo: David Swift

Courtesy Wyoming Arts. Photo: David Swift

 

 

 

 

 

Mar
10
David Brookover - Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

Can you name more than one photographer creating hand-made photogravure prints — or platinum prints — in Jackson other than David Brookover? I can’t. Brookover’s photography intuition is astounding. His dedication to the finest, most painstaking forms of photography continue to pay off. And by “pay off,” I mean Brookover reaps good karma in addition to a solid record of excellent sales. David Brookover refuses to rest on his laurels. When he’s not watching over his Gaslight Alley gallery, he’s out in the field, shooting.

Far afield. Next stop: Iceland.

Brookover prints his images on the finest hand made Japanese gampi paper; back in February printmaker Jon Lybrook and Brookover gave a public presentation on the subject. In the gallery now are samples of gampi and kozo papers; these gampi sheets are likely the last the paper artisan will ever make.

IMG_2889“There’s so much work involved,” says Brookover. “It’s impossible to harvest gampi; it has to be gleaned from the forests of China and Japan.”

Downstairs at Brookover’s gallery visitors may view sensitive, educational videos on the art of paper making; spend 20 minutes watching, and the import of what this photographer has achieved will become clear.

Brookover’s latest works explore California’s tangled, ancient and atmospheric landscapes. Brookover pointed his camera at that state’s storied coastal seascapes, cypress trees, cliffs, cactus and rock formations. We know these images are taken in California, but each sweeps us up into universal chi.

David Brookover - Thermal Glide-California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Thermal Glide, California. Photogravure

It’s impossible to grasp the depth and detail of Brookover’s work here; I strongly encourage collectors and all souls interested in the art of photography to visit. See the intention of these new works for yourself. Allow your eye to peruse a cypress tree’s balance, its roots gripped to a rocky cliff. Thermal sea bird ascents and a cactus’ graphic perfection are palpable. www.brookovergallery.com

209

“Three artists have been chosen as finalists in the South Cache Complete Streets Paintings & Pavers Project,” writes JH Public Art. Those artists are: Molly Dilworth of Brooklyn, NY, David Klaren of Pinedale, WY and Joshua Wiener of Boulder, CO. They will receive funds to develop creative paver concepts and street paintings on a redesigned South Cache Street.

Close to Jackson’s arts scene, David Klaren has long been a Wyoming contemporary arts activist. Klarens’ mediums range from meticulous graphite and ink drawings to large commissions in wood and concrete.

Dilworth creates outdoor site-specific, researched art. She has partnered with green building community organizations, climate change activities, arts organizations and government agencies, says J.H. Public Art.

Wiener’s large-scale sculptures can incorporate stone, steel, bronze, water, earth, concrete, sand — and asphalt. The artist works to reflect place and time in his art. www.jhpublicart.org.

Billy Schenck - You Want What? - 45x35"

Billy Schenck – You Want What? – 45×35″

Altamira Fine Art has exciting new acquisitions in their Jackson Hole Gallery. And, I’m pleased to report that all is going well at Altamira’s new Scottsdale, AZ gallery, which carries works by many of Altamira’s Jackson artists and serves the secondary contemporary Western Art market.

Ed Mell, John Nieto, Rocky Hawkins and Billy Schenck are names any Western Contemporary Art enthusiast will know; and works by these artists are now available through Altamira. Mell’s jagged, dynamic geometric landscapes, Schenck’s humorous Western Pop, American Expressionist master Nieto channeling Picasso, and Hawkins’ painterly, spiritual paintings are in the house. Click here to see all the gallery’s new works.  www.altamiraart.com