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Posts Tagged ‘Altamira Fine Art’

Apr
14
David Grossman - Blossoming Trees - Oil on Linen - 8x10"

David Grossman – Blossoming Trees – Oil on Linen – 8×10″

“No, I said: What kind of bird are YOU?” ~ Sam, to Suzy, upon their first meeting in the film “Moonrise Kingdom.”  

Contemplative, visual poems. Painterly, reminding me of a wistful Childe Hassam; contemporary, like a print; gentle, glowing and linear. Colorado painter David Grossman is one of three new artists signed on to Altamira Fine Art. Grossman is joined by contemporary artists David Michael Slonim and bold trendsetter Thom Ross.

Attribute it to the soft, indecisive changing of our alpine seasons, call it a love of landscape. My heart has been stolen by Grossman’s diminutive oil painting, shown above. He paints, says the gallery, “abstracted visions of forests…melodic in their focus on rhythm and symmetry.” Adds Fine Art Connoisseur: “[Grossman's paintings] effect the comfort and relief of a ‘visual exhale’ while also leading us into meditative contemplation and thought.”

A few brushstrokes and we are eras away in time, lost in a happy composition. 

Thom Ross - Gunman's Walk - Oil on Canvas 48 x 48"

Thom Ross – Gunman’s Walk – Oil on Canvas
48 x 48″

Have you been around Jackson long enough to remember California born artist Thom Ross’ installation at Snow King’s base? “Custer’s Last Stand” was an erected forest of early American soldiers pitted against Native Americans. We walked through and around the battle, and though that battle is one of the West’s most defining moments, Ross’ style is to portray iconic Americans and events in off-beat (gunmen with tiny heads!), sometimes complex and unexpected ways. He can be sensitive and elegiac; friends own an early Thom Ross painting depicting a solitary dead horse, lying on its side. It’s beautiful.

“Indians playing croquet; General Custer riding off while balancing a table on his head; Sheriff Pat Garrett standing with shotgun in hands bracing against the cold of a wintry New Mexico morning – these are a few of the unique images depicted in Ross’s paintings,” says Altamira. In addition to creating his art, Ross runs his own space, “Due West Gallery,” in Santa Fe.

David Michael Slonim - Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas-48 x 60"

David Michael Slonim – Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas- 48 x 60″

They are landscapes; landscapes deconstructed to layered, broad color fields, conveying essence. Contemporary painter David Michael Slonim is the third “new bird” to alight at Altamira. Plein air painting and illustration are part of his professional artistic experience.

Prisms, shards of translucent glass, collage — these I see in the artist’s expressionist works. Slonim is influenced by a bevy of masters, including Diebenkorn, Mitchell, Motherwell, de Kooning, and Cezanne.

“Although my paintings are derived from nature, they are really about color, shape, texture and line for their own sake,” says Slonim. “I started out as a plein air painter. The more I painted and studied, the more fascinated I became with abstraction. Now I am more interested in interpreting nature than representing nature.”  www.altamiraart.com 

Kyle Pozin - Mystic Warrior

Kyle Polzin – Mystic Warrior -Oil- 74 x 30″

In case you haven’t heard: April 5th’s Scottsdale Art Auction brought in $12.6 million.

Ecstatic press materials report that Frederic Remington’s “The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero,” an oil estimated between $500,000 – $700,000, sold for $920,000, the top sale of the day. Many deceased and contemporary masters did exceedingly well, but, emphasizes the auction:

“The crowd of almost 500 bidders was stunned when a 40-year-old artist from Texas, Kyle Polzin, took the block with a 74 x 30 inch oil entitled “Mystic Warrior.” Estimated up to $40,000, an extended bidding war ended in a hush, as auctioneer Jason Brooks carefully guided bids to a final total of $287,500.”

The Scottsdale Art Auction has now realized over $100,000,000 in art sales over the course of a decade. For complete results, visit www.scottsdaleartauction.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Mar
10
David Brookover - Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Kiri and the Veteran, California. Photogravure

Can you name more than one photographer creating hand-made photogravure prints — or platinum prints — in Jackson other than David Brookover? I can’t. Brookover’s photography intuition is astounding. His dedication to the finest, most painstaking forms of photography continue to pay off. And by “pay off,” I mean Brookover reaps good karma in addition to a solid record of excellent sales. David Brookover refuses to rest on his laurels. When he’s not watching over his Gaslight Alley gallery, he’s out in the field, shooting.

Far afield. Next stop: Iceland.

Brookover prints his images on the finest hand made Japanese gampi paper; back in February printmaker Jon Lybrook and Brookover gave a public presentation on the subject. In the gallery now are samples of gampi and kozo papers; these gampi sheets are likely the last the paper artisan will ever make.

IMG_2889“There’s so much work involved,” says Brookover. “It’s impossible to harvest gampi; it has to be gleaned from the forests of China and Japan.”

Downstairs at Brookover’s gallery visitors may view sensitive, educational videos on the art of paper making; spend 20 minutes watching, and the import of what this photographer has achieved will become clear.

Brookover’s latest works explore California’s tangled, ancient and atmospheric landscapes. Brookover pointed his camera at that state’s storied coastal seascapes, cypress trees, cliffs, cactus and rock formations. We know these images are taken in California, but each sweeps us up into universal chi.

David Brookover - Thermal Glide-California. Photogravure

David Brookover – Thermal Glide, California. Photogravure

It’s impossible to grasp the depth and detail of Brookover’s work here; I strongly encourage collectors and all souls interested in the art of photography to visit. See the intention of these new works for yourself. Allow your eye to peruse a cypress tree’s balance, its roots gripped to a rocky cliff. Thermal sea bird ascents and a cactus’ graphic perfection are palpable. www.brookovergallery.com

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“Three artists have been chosen as finalists in the South Cache Complete Streets Paintings & Pavers Project,” writes JH Public Art. Those artists are: Molly Dilworth of Brooklyn, NY, David Klaren of Pinedale, WY and Joshua Wiener of Boulder, CO. They will receive funds to develop creative paver concepts and street paintings on a redesigned South Cache Street.

Close to Jackson’s arts scene, David Klaren has long been a Wyoming contemporary arts activist. Klarens’ mediums range from meticulous graphite and ink drawings to large commissions in wood and concrete.

Dilworth creates outdoor site-specific, researched art. She has partnered with green building community organizations, climate change activities, arts organizations and government agencies, says J.H. Public Art.

Wiener’s large-scale sculptures can incorporate stone, steel, bronze, water, earth, concrete, sand — and asphalt. The artist works to reflect place and time in his art. www.jhpublicart.org.

Billy Schenck - You Want What? - 45x35"

Billy Schenck – You Want What? – 45×35″

Altamira Fine Art has exciting new acquisitions in their Jackson Hole Gallery. And, I’m pleased to report that all is going well at Altamira’s new Scottsdale, AZ gallery, which carries works by many of Altamira’s Jackson artists and serves the secondary contemporary Western Art market.

Ed Mell, John Nieto, Rocky Hawkins and Billy Schenck are names any Western Contemporary Art enthusiast will know; and works by these artists are now available through Altamira. Mell’s jagged, dynamic geometric landscapes, Schenck’s humorous Western Pop, American Expressionist master Nieto channeling Picasso, and Hawkins’ painterly, spiritual paintings are in the house. Click here to see all the gallery’s new works.  www.altamiraart.com 

 

Feb
03
Erin C. O'Connor - Untitled

Erin C. O’Connor – Untitled

“The mission of the Atlas Cultural Foundation is to help underserved Moroccans, especially women and children, and improve their quality of life through locally determined development projects.” - Cloe Erickson, Founder

“The people are living exactly they way they have for hundreds and hundreds of years. Stone houses, sheep, goats, a very marginal existence. They are agricultural, but it’s extremely sparse terrain. You can’t truly realize how lush and beautiful it is here until you visit places like these.” – Jackson Artist Erin C. O’Connor

Even the briefest of visits to the Morocco-based  Atlas Cultural Foundation will take your breath away. People, music, swirling rainbows of cloth, smiling children, the purity of souls, laughter, donkeys loaded with grains making their way up steep mountainsides on paths as wide as piece of thread, stone houses seemingly impossible to build…African light on high cliffs, solitary townspeople under tents, illuminated by candlelight.

By Erin C. O'Connor

By Erin C. O’Connor

“These villages,” says plein air painter Erin O’Connor, “are in the High Atlas Mountains, in the middle of nowhere, at the end of a dirt road that probably should have ended 60 miles before it does. It’s unimaginable. The area was the last place for the French Foreign Legion to access, it is so remote.”

Recently O’Connor and a colleague landed the chance to go to Morocco, visit the Atlas Mountains and spend time in the ancient city of Medina, as part of an Atlas awareness-raising initiative. A Montana patron with a strong interest in the organization’s mission financed the trip. O’Connor’s paintings and works by other artists will be offered for sale on February 6th, at a private event in Bozeman, Montana.

“I’d always wanted to go to Morocco. EVERYTHING there is art: the wrought iron on the windows, the tile work, the architecture, the doors, I wanted to paint it all,” says O’Connor. “This opportunity came up,  andI had to say ‘yes.’ It was serendipitous. The funny thing is, I have always considered myself a plein air landscape painter, but being in Marrakesh, in the oldest part the Medina, 8,ooo years old, it was all small alley ways, souks (marketplaces), so many people in such a small place. I was forced to paint in really tight corners! I had two jobs every day: one was to go out and prove just how much my French sucks and the other was to get lost! You go through humbly.”

O’Connor began her trek in the Medina, where she spent almost a week on her own, painting. One day she found herself wedged up in a small souk corner, people pushing by her in huge throngs, very intense for a solitary outdoor artist.

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Jan
06

Eye

Eye, yai yai~~~Happy New Year, Jackson!  It’s nice to see you again. Been visiting family and taking in the views offered up by rosy winter lake sunsets, frozen, wind-whipped pines, friends, the Yale Art Museum (try closing your eyes in there!), tasting good soul food—and now it’s time to catch up around here.

Today’s post is a warm-up, so I’ll list items from my “in box” that many of you may already know about. Or maybe, like me, you’ve been away. Here goes:

Altamira Fine Art is headed to the L.A. Art Show, 2014, January 15-19, 2014 Booth 240. Altamira artists “Billy” Schenck, Ed Mell (they got him!), R. Tom Gilleon, Glenn Dean, Rocky Hawkins and selected paintings from Fritz Scholder (1937-2005). Opening night party: 1/15/14, 8-11:00 pm.  www.altamiraart.com

la_artshowemail

David Swift is artfully photographing high-octane performers swinging through the theater doors at the J.H.Center for the Arts. He is clearly enjoying himself! “Giddy” is the word I’d use. BTW, the New York Times recently ran a travel article on Jackson’s ski scene.  Paper edition photo captions were way off~~the scenes did not depict what the captions described, and the captions were out of order. Still, great coverage for J.H. A source tells me that story was in the NYT hopper last summer, and one special gallery they mentioned was Cayuse Western Americana. Good get. 

The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s next “Mix’d Media – Darwin’s Legacy” takes place at the museum on Thursday, January 9th, 6-9 pm. Additionally, Director of Education Jane Lavino has posted a new NMWA job opening – Part-Time Assistant Curator of Education. Check it out at   http://www.wildlifeart.org/about/employment/

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Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works — the first to be hosted by the Center for the Arts — at the Center Theater Gallery. An Exhibit Opening takes place on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. “Interiors/Exteriors” explores the artist’s two painting styles, both highly developed. The show remains up January 13-29th, 2013. Love the promotional image, it’s like a 60′s record cover –twist and shout! More on Kosharek’s show in our next post.

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Direct from Wyoming Arts (verbatim):  The Visual Arts Fellowship application is now open! Deadline: March 10. Applications will be accepted on CaFE only (www.callforentry.com). Visual artists of all kinds, including film and video, are invited to apply. More information available in the call on CaFE or at http://wyoarts.state.wy.us/wac-grant/fellowship-for-visual-artists/. Juror information in included on the webpage. Additionally, CLICK! is coming together! Save the date for April 4-5 in Fort Washakie/Lander. Information and registration will be available mid-January. Want to know more about Wyoming Visual Arts happenings? Sign up for their list serve:  http://www.openvistas.net/sign_up.html

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Some dude is publicly persistent in his queries about  J.H. Public Art  project press releases on our community list serve. Anyone know this guy? Whatever is going on there, I’ll include that arts non-profit’s new “call for entries” information in my next post, too.

For you at this New Year, Jackson, a tiny excerpt from “All the Hemispheres,” by Sufi Poet Hafiz: Leave the familiar for a while/Let your senses and bodies stretch out/Like a welcomed season/Onto the meadows and shores and hills./Open up the roof.

 

 

 

Dec
16
September Vhay - Red Horse 477

September Vhay – Red Horse 477

Think RED. 

Away to the galleries I flew like a flash,

Burst past reception, hit the floor in a dash.

The moon on the breast of the new fallen snow,

Reflected  September Vhay’s lustrous show;

When, what to my wondering eyes should appear,

Glistening canvas, crimson swirls and Red Horses so near…

“All the Red Horses,” a show of new paintings by Jackson artist September Vhay, opens at Altamira Fine Art December 16, 2013, and an opening reception takes place Thursday, December 19, 5-7:00 pm at the gallery; Vhay gives a talk at 6:00 pm. The exhibit remains up through New Year’s Day, 2014.

Vhay will discuss the origins of her Red Horses and creativity, but the gallery has provided a sneak peek as to what Vhay may touch upon. The series began several years ago as a way for Vhay to deepen her exploration of horses’ intrinsic qualities and forms, says Altamira. Initially these paintings, based on the study of sumi-e art and abstract sculptural work, were compact. Over time, and with the added luxury of larger exhibition space, Vhay’s minimalist, contemporary red horses began appearing in larger scale. Bordering on the abstract, Vhay’s images remain proportionally true. Large and small oils on canvas, as well as watercolors on paper, comprise the show. Red on White: Vhay’s serene gestural series evokes the distillation and essence of the equine form – and the West in wintertime.  www.altamiraart.com 

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