Tag Archives: Art Installations

Seeing Double at Tayloe Piggott Gallery: Travagli & Katz

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image

Patrizio Travagli, Mirror Image, a work from “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall” at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery.

Recalculating! What is reality? Who am I?

You’ll have to wait for the new show at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery to find out. “Mirror, Mirror on the Wall,” a group of works by Italian artist Patrizio Travagli, is so new that, with the exception of the work shown above, it hasn’t yet been photographed. The exhibit runs  August 16 – September 30th. Join the gallery for an opening reception on Tuesday, August 16th, 6-8:00 pm.

“My intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite.” ~  Patrizio Travagli

This may be the ultimate selfie moment. Travagli is fascinated by light’s power to shift perception. You will become part of this exhibit~~your reflection in any of six large mirrors, each with their own reflective and color properties, change and shift and with you, the viewer.

From "In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini - Florence | 2016"

From In-Lusionem (Patrizio Travagli and Marco De Vincenzo) | Teatro Niccolini – Florence | 2016″. Taken from a previous exhibition in Italy; research on the artist and the descriptions of his upcoming show at Tayloe Piggott prompted me to share this photo example of an earlier Travagli project.

Travagli aims to lead viewers in rethinking their perception of space, regardless of a wide variety of techniques, such as painting, sculpting, video, photography and installation.

“I frequently collaborate with scientists and professionals of other fields, such as architects and designers, in order to achieve a complete result….my intention is to guide spectators on a journey in which their knowledge of space is put to the test, revealing the imperceptible and disclosing new dimensions that stretch towards the infinite,” says the artist.

“Stretch?” I hope those mirrors don’t make me look fat!

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

Alex Katz. Ariel (Red), ed. 26/56, 2016, 26-color silkscreen.

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Potter’s Pending Pendants at MFA

What is a portrait? A profile? Who are your friends, and who is “pending,” waiting to be connected with you? Perhaps you’ve issued invitations to “friend” people on Facebook and never received a response. For any number of reasons, you’ve not replied to requests with a click of the “Accept” button.

https://vine.co/v/ejJ5VDx5P1r

“Pending,” glass artist Charlotte Potter’s newest large scale installation at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, was created to celebrate the potential of new friendships via social media.

“I am interested in various levels of familiarity and intimacy that develop with online personas and associations.” ~ Charlotte Potter

“Historically,” says Potter, a “profile” portrait was quite literally a person’s silhouette, and often these would be hand-engraved as a glass cameo pendant. The modern profile (or portrait) [are Facebook profile pictures.]

As interactions have become more virtual, Potter’s goal with this project is to make connections physical once again. She’s created handmade objects~~cameos~~from public images on Facebook.

Potter collected profile pictures of pending “friend requests” from the spring of 2014 and hand-engraved a small glass cameo of each. Cataloguing meticulously, she arranged pendants geographically, according to individuals’ Facebook information. Each grouping protrudes from the wall in direct proportion to how many friends Potter shares with her “pendings.”

Charlotte Potter. Courtesy hamptonroads.com

Charlotte Potter. Courtesy hamptonroads.com

“I am interested in various levels of familiarity and intimacy that develop with online personas and associations. I hope for the piece to challenge audiences to reconceptualize relationships in the digital age and consider the different thresholds of friendship in our lives,” says the artist.

Potter goes on to say that pending friend requests are “in a certain kind of limbo, a liminal space between acceptance, knowing and memory.” For Potter, people exist in this space for many reasons; in her case, she includes distant family members, mutual friends, friends from early school days, colleagues, or people she simply can’t place.

My Profile, by Charlotte Potter

My Profile, by Charlotte Potter

 

“Maybe I have yet to meet you in person or have simply overlooked my notifications; some of you are now my dear friends, trusted colleauges, acquaintances, and some of you may still be ‘pending.’ I see this work as celebrating the potential of new relationships. I thank everyone whose profile is included in this project for your fortuitious participation.”

Learn more about Potter and the exhibit at www.charlottepotter.com 

“Conservation Gallery”; Pipe Up on Public Art; Global Photography at Intencions

Tigers.122124

Some press materials are simply so perfect and complete, it’s hard to up their message. That’s the case today! Here’s some information on the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s new exhibition, “Conservation Gallery,” which explores conservation themes by comparing and contrasting those themes as explored through artwork created from the 1800’s to today. The show opened November 16th, and will remain on display through April 13, 2014.

“American wildlife artists have helped to capture the positive and negative results of humanity’s interactions with wildlife still found today, as well as those that are simply a memory. In some instances, paintings and illustrations are the only record of certain species that we have,” says the museum’s Petersen Curator of Art and Research Adam Duncan Harris. Harris notes that artists’ interpretations of wildlife run the gamut from that of early American artist William Jacob Hays, who, says Harris, depicted the animals he saw on exploratory expeditions to the American West, visually preserving them for future generations—-to more conscious conservation messages, such as Steve Kestrel’s “Silent Messenger” (2005), that, in the artist’s own words, “mourn[s] the destruction and degradation of ecosystems worldwide and the tragic loss of unique animal species.”

Steve Kestrel - Silent Messenger - 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Steve Kestrel – Silent Messenger – 2005. Courtesy www.stevekestrel.com

Natural histories such as the rebound of bison populations lead to “tales of wildlife across the globe.” The tiger is well represented, and displays engage viewers with information that’s often revelatory. For instance, did you know that in the U.S. more tigers are currently owned by private individuals, not zoos, than exist in the wild? Approximately 5,000 tigers are in the U.S., according to the World Wildlife Foundation. 

“Artworks depicting endangered species, whether historical or contemporary, raise pointed questions about humanity’s role in species survival or extinction. We hope that Conservation Gallery will help spark some of those discussions with our visitors,” says Harris.

Images, top of page:  From “Conservation Gallery”: Wilhelm Kuhnert, Resting Tiger, 1912. JKM Collection©, National Museum of Wildlife Art (left), and Gwynn Murrill (United States, b. 1942), Tiger 2, 2012 -2013. Bronze. 42 x 62 x 31 inches. Dr. Lee W. Lenz, National Museum of Wildlife Art. © Gwynn Murrill (right)

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Public Art is Town Art!

121By now, many Jackson Hole arts personalities and organizations have heard the news that on March 18th, the Jackson Town Council created a Public Art Task Force. That new entity will have an official relationship with JH Public Art, and Carrie Geraci was named Public Art Coordinator. The step bolsters JH Public Art’s efforts to establish “systematic review of all public art projects proposed in the valley,” providing a “second layer of review” that places community and public safety as top priorities.

Geraci sent out the call to anyone interested in working with the Public Art Task force, an opportunity to be involved in the direction and quality of public art going forward. An interesting prospect, and I sent Geraci some questions about how the Task Force would work and what how JH Public Art, a non-profit, would be incorporated into Town planning for public art.

Geraci says the task force will will consist of approximately seven individuals, and positions are voluntary. Geraci estimates that the number of task force meetings per year could count anywhere from two to 12, depending on need.

John Frechette - Detail from Home Ranch Project, Jackson Hole

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“Northwest Contemporary” Links Regional Artists; Life Classes

Garth_Claassen-ContendingBorders_GHC2011“Art is knowledge at the service of emotion.” ~ José Clemente Orozco

“Northwest Contemporary,” curated by the Nicolaysen Art Museum’s Lisa Hatchadoorian, the Missoula Art Museum’s Stephen Glueckert, the Aspen Art Museum’s Jacob Proctor and the Boise Art Museum’s Sandy Hawthorn, opens at the Art Association of Jackson Hole on Friday, March 22nd, 5:30 – 7:30 pm. This opening reception is free; the show remains on display through April 21st.

Local artists Suzanne Morlock (“Free Fall,” below) and large-scale installation artist Abbie Miller have, according to the Art Association’s Thomas Macker, transformed the gallery space into ” re-contextualized environments of form and tactile texture.”  All textures are tactile, but these are undoubtedly very enticing to the touch.

And, testifies Macker,  your body will “re-map” as you move through this show. The work “allows you to feel weightless as your eye glides through serpentine forms in a white cube cage.”

Go WITH your eyes, don’t let them wander off by themselves!

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