Tag Archives: Artists in the Environment

Your Plein Air Roots

Thomas McGlynne  Blossoms  1878 – 1966  20 x 24 inches  Medium: Oil on board   Available at Karges Fine Art.

“I aspire to become an inhabitant, one who knows and honors the land…I follow various and sometimes crooked paths, yet I am always driven by a single desire, that of learning to be at home.” ~ Scott Russell Sanders

What are your plein air “roots?”

We dug in the dirt. Light was miraculous. During my California youth, down on hands and knees to touch, smell and fondle beach flowers tendrils, pungent and squishy succulents, inhaling the scent of tiny cliff side scrub, peeling puzzle-shaped eucalyptus bark, running my fingers along those arrow-like leaves was a daily ritual. Every canyon trail was fair game.

There’s something from every art movement to love, but before I even knew what it was, plein air painting was in my blood.

Sullivan Canyon Trail

Childhood years were a nirvana of clamoring, swimming and hiking in and around the Santa Monica-Pacific Palisades-Malibu landscapes. We lived on a Sullivan Canyon hillside, on Old Ranch Road, in a Cliff May home. At the foot of our long, winding driveway was a large open field, and we called it… “the Field.” Cross the Field and you found yourself on Sullivan Canyon Road. Open and dusty, we kids played, and people rode horses, picnicked, threw frisbees. Now the Field is an established riding arena, and its scrubby oak tree terrain seems shrunken.

But the Field was where I first saw plein air painters at work.

I was 10, my brother six when, one morning, we walked down to the Field. A group of plein air painters had gathered under the eucalyptus. Their clothes, easels, hats…all were “foreign” to us, figures materialized from another era. My brother and I made our way over to the group.

One artist focused on a view oriented toward our house. Holding hands, we watched as the artist suddenly painted us–I with my white blonde hair and John a carrot-topped red-head–into the scene. Two tiny children dwarfed by ancient oaks, eucalyptus, wading in wildflowers, California’s hills sweeping skyward behind us. Nature is the master, we are only suggested.

Dennis M. Doheny “Late Light Poppies, Oil on Linen, 24 x 30”

I’m still in contact with California grade school friends. One of my classmates is the great California landscape Impressionist Dennis M. Doheny. His paintings are among the most awarded and sought after works by a living California plein air painter. He’s represented by another classmate, Karges Fine Art’s Whitney Ganz.

Jim Wodark, “Night Spirit,” Oil on Linen, 12 x 12″

I discovered Jim Wodark’s work at last summer’s Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters “Plein Air for the Park” event. The paint-out is back this summer, a fine venue for meeting and cultivating your plein air palette. So many artists, so many painting styles. Wodark, I think, is a master. His works emit Western dry heat and that silver, scented light permeats the sage.

Lamya Deeb, also new to “Plein Air for the Park” last summer, caught many art lovers’ attention. A quiet presence, she lives and works near Boulder, Colorado. Her paintings are soft whispering masses of color, form and light. Floating, sometimes bordering on the abstract, her paintings represent a departure from more representative plein air styles.

Lamya Deeb, Billowing, Oil on Panel, 8 x 10″   “My aim is to convey the unique essence and beauty of a particular moment and place, and to share the feeling of that experience with the viewer,” says Deeb.

Whenever a plein air work feels so rich that I can “smell” the landscape, I’m a goner.

Plein Air season approaches! It’s my favorite time of year here in Jackson Hole, Grand Teton National Park and the Greater Yellowstone region. Artists are out painting everywhere, offering new work fresh from a session on Antelope Flats, Jenny Lake, Mormon Row, Oxbow, the Elk Refuge, the Teton Village area, Moose, Moran Junction, Spring Gulch Road and Hardeman Ranch .

This summer’s major plein air events in the Jackson Hole/Grand Teton National Park/Greater Yellowstone/Teton Valley, Idaho include: Plein Air for the Park, the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Plein Air Fest (which includes artists creating works other than plein air paintings), Artists in the Environment, Driggs Plein Air, the Teton Plein Air Painters, and during the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival, artists spread out for the “Quick Draw,” a festival favorite!

The Jackson Hole Art Blog is full of plein air stories! Just enter the words “plein air” in the search box to find dozens of stories on Jackson Hole artists and their work! See you out there!

Travis Walker, “Niko.”

Over the Rooftops; Letscher Lands at Tayloe Piggott

Bobbi Miller, “Over the Rooftop,” 6×6″ oil

Moran, Wyoming lies 30 miles north of the Town of Jackson. Last month Moran received almost 40 inches of snow, 10 inches above normal. Jackson has received almost the same amount, but Moran’s isolated location lends itself to days of being no other place than Moran.

It’s a singularly beautiful, remote and a Grand Teton National Park gateway. If you are a plein air painter, Moran offers an infinite number of beautiful locations and constant inspiration.

A Moran resident, Teton Plein Air Painter Bobbi Miller this winter has left her in awe of the Park’s forefathers who battled intense winter conditions without any of the modern conveniences we enjoy today. Confined to painting indoors this winter, Miller’s painting style has veered towards abstraction; quick work and impressions of landscape are intriguing.

“I must admit to putting those foot warmers in my boots when DRIVING to Dubois, Wyoming recently,” Miller confesses. Dubois lies approximately 75 miles east of Moran, and to get there one must travel over the spectacular but potentially very dangerous Togwotee Pass.

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Lee Carlman Riddell’s Winter Wonders; Jivan Lee in Scottsdale

Lee Carlman Riddell, “Cold and Clearing”

“Truth be told, I do not paint outside in the winter. I tried it once, thinking that if Greg McHuron could do it, so could I.” ~ Lee Carlman Riddell 

Greg McHuron, you have no idea the shoes you’ve left to fill. How can we channel your inner snow beast and brave this snarling, ice-jamming winter? There is just one Gregory I. McHuron, and that’s you, dear friend. We miss you, and we are eternally grateful to Susan H. McGarry, who saw the publication of your book through.

Lee Carlman Riddell joyfully participates in countless plein air events in during warmer months. In the winter time she’s a studio girl. Carlman’s work is on constant exhibit at WRJ Associates  (as is her husband’s, photographer Edward Riddell) in downtown Jackson, and her gentle paintings, so elegant in their simplicity and color palette, are immediately identifiable.

Lee Carlman Riddell. “Cottonwoods For Monet.”

WRJ not only understands Riddell’s work; they treasure it. Step through their doors on King Street and her paintings, hung throughout the space, beckon like jewels. Softened jewels~~~colors that understand time and nature’s effects.

“Whenever she ventures outdoors, she sees something new, particularly on routes she knows well; a stand of cottonwoods, passed countless times before, suddenly appears as if plucked from Monet’s Rouen Cathedral paintings,” writes the design group. “Her paintings thus bear witness to her distinctly wide vision, her rare instinct for finding ephemeral beauty.”

As for winter…..after valiant efforts, Riddell prefers the warmth of studio work.

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Wherever We Go, Art is the Heart

I was going to tell you that if I could live on art, I would. Then I realized I already do. And so do we all, in some way or another. Art is, literally, all around us. The keyboard I’m typing on is someone’s imaginiative creation. The lamp on my desk, the paintings on my wall, my books, the clothes I wear (though in my case I have to fall short of calling what I wear “wearable art.” It’s more like “wearable earrings and sweatshirts.”).

Outstanding in her field: Kathy Wipfler.

Recipes are art, the chairs we sit on. Loving one another and sticking by the Golden Rule is an art. That particular rule is, for some reason so difficult to follow. Why is that? It’s so simple to do the right thing. One of the most obvious “right things” is to respond to friends and colleagues when they reach out. When we don’t respond, the thing we remember IS the non-response. That’s not what you want people to remember, professionally or otherwise.

Todd Kosharek at work. Todd’s passion, work ethic and kindness are the best of Jackson Hole’s art heart.

My wish for us this year is to always try to do the right thing. Think it out. Be honest, but balanced. Who are your mentors? Who do you hold up as a hero amongst us? When trying to decide how to act, what choices to make, how to respond, how to walk this earth, I implore you: Do the right thing.

Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters’ Quick Draw” at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitors Center in Grand Teton National Park.

One “compassion researcher” I know of says this: “We are taught that there is a right and wrong way to behave, to act and to think. Stepping outside this construct is a big shift. Non-judgmental acceptance of what it means to embrace all suffering on the planet takes development.”

Plein Air Cowboy Bar!

I’m not religious, but I try to find the good path, make choices that align my soul and help me towards peace and contentment. So often that effort winds up involving huge, ongoing struggles. Breaking things down to day-to-day triumphs is a better choice. Much of the time our thoughts are of the future, one dream after another. I can be guilty of spending more time dreaming than doing, especially during these challenging winter months.

Today my goal is to break that pattern up a little and re-start this blog! I will begin my book in earnest this year. I will work and produce positively to the benefit of arts here as they are related to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s phenomenal beauty and the wealth of art in our galleries and superb new generation of artists.

Bronwyn Minton, for “View 22.” I purchased my first “Bronwyn” this year!

I will try to present all forms of Jackson’s visual arts to the best of my ability; none of us relates to EVERY SINGLE work of art, but we can appreciate every effort, love that it exists, discuss art and feel lucky our particular creative vortex is so powerful.

Borbay and Friend. Connecting with this guy was a highlight of the year! He’s really a softie.

And so this first post of 2017 contains some of my favorite images and moments from 2016’s Jackson Hole art offerings and events. Just a very few~~there were SO many! To see more images from the past year, visit my Art Blog Facebook Page .  If you enjoy those posts, please “Like” the page and tell your friends! 

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960)
Portrait,1929. The Jackson Hole Art Auction had some exquisite works.

As ever, my deepest gratitude to everyone who appreciates and reads The Jackson Hole Art Blog. I’m thankful and proud.

David Michael Slonim at Altamira Fine Art.

The Jackson Hole Art Blog’s new header image: Detail from David Michael Slonim’s “Bailando,” at Altamira Fine Art.  

 

HOWL: Here Comes Fall Arts!

“Greeting the Dawn” by Edward Aldrich is this year's Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival official painting.

“Greeting the Dawn” by Edward Aldrich is this year’s Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival official image. Visit it at the historic Wort Hotel!

It’s September again! Time to present what we’ve all come to think of as Fall Arts Festival “gold.”  September 7-18, 2016  are the dates for 2016’s Jackson Hole’s annual Fall Arts Festival!

Quite seriously, the Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival is one of the West’s premier arts events, an arts destination. Everybody gets in on the action, and there is a LOT of action! The Festival has something for everyone~~folks of all ages love “Taking it to the Streets” and the Town Square’s “Quick Draw.” Collectors come out for the Jackson Hole Art Auction. The whole town and then some are out during Palates & Palettes! There are paintings, photography, sculpture, installations, parties, food, design, fashion shows and showcases, jewelry, auctions, home and studio tours. There are prizes, there are reunions. And Jackson’s galleries roll out the red carpet.

Today we present calendar events for September 7 – 9th. 

ENERGY. TONS OF ENERGY! ENJOY!  

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

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The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s  “Jewelry and Artisan Luncheon” kicks off Fall Arts! Part of the museum’s FAF Western Visions series of events, the lunch at Four Seasons in Teton Village features a veritable feast of bling and wearable art. Attendees enjoy a luscious lunch. Sales help benefit NMWA’s educational programs.

Time: 11:00 am – 4:00 pm.

Now here’s where I’m a little confused: Press info indicates two locations for this event, the Four Seasons and The Inn at Jackson Hole Conference Center. Check to make sure you’re right! Tickets are $135 each and tables of 10 go for $2,500. I believe that makes those tables official sponsors. For information phone 307.732.5445 or check www.westernvisions.org

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WRJ Associates – “Context: The Art of Life” 

WRJ Associates is at once a furnishings gallery, art gallery and design destination. During Fall Arts, it will be a gourmet destination! “Context: The Art of Life” offers a sumptuous Open House ALL DAY, 10:00 am – 6:00 pm, at WRJ’s showroom, 30 S. King Street, in Jackson. The show features some of Jackson’s most distinguished artists using a variety of media. Persephone Bakery does the food. See “Context’s” artists here.  www.wrjdesign.com

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Western Design! Plus Fashion, Plus Preview Party!

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Left to right: Runway couture by Anna Trzebinski (CO) at WDC Fashion Show; Custom gold-topped boots by Tomasso Arditti (TX); and wooden chair by artist Steve Henneford (MT)

The Western Design Conference Opening Preview affords ticket buyers a first look at all things new in Western design, fashion and furnishings. Meet artisans, enjoy a runway fashion show, take a walk through the Designer Show House, and take part in a live auction.  Café Genevieve provides cuisine.

Where: Snow King Center.  Time: 6-10pm. Tix: $125 VIP and $50 General Admission. In advance on line, or at the door. westerndesignconference.com

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Western Design Conference Exhibit + Sale opens to the public. Open 10:00 am  – 5:00 pm. $15 at the door.  westerndesignconference.com

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PALATES & PALETTES GALLERY WALK!  5:00-8:00 pm, Town of Jackson.

Walk, don’t run! Plan your route. 30 + galleries open their doors to one and all! The evening is one of FAF’s most anticipated events. Each gallery provides yummy munchies from local eateries, wine and buckets of fine, fun art! A great way to get familiar with Jackson’s gallery scene if you’ve not been acquainted. A great reason to go see those artists and spaces you’ve been meaning to see!  You can get a P&P map at Jackson’s Chamber of Commerce and participating galleries. Here’s a sampling. FREE!!!!!  info@jacksonholechamber.com

Fritz Scholder Mystery Woman with White Horse, 1994 Acrylic on Canvas 80 x 68 inches

Fritz Scholder, Mystery Woman with White Horse, 1994. Acrylic on Canvas,
80 x 68 inches.

Altamira Fine Art – Fritz Scholder. 

“I’m interested in someone reacting to the work. And I don’t much care if they react negatively or positively, as long as they react. I felt it to be a compliment when I was told that I had destroyed the traditional style of Indian art.” – Fritz Scholder

The show features over a dozen original paintings, including iconic, published works as well as never-before- shown paintings, which span the artists career from 1964-2004. The exhibition will also include lithographs, monotypes and bronze. Published works include important paintings from the 2008 Smithsonian retrospective, “Indian/Not Indian,” an unprecedented solo exhibition of Scholder’s work, shown at both the museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. as well as the George Gustav Heye Center in New York City,  a first for the National Museum of the American Indian, who had not previously had a show of that magnitude for any other native artist.  www.altamiraart.com 

Claire Brewster

Claire Brewster

Diehl Gallery – Claire Brewster:  A Conference of Birds

Using primarily old maps and atlases as her canvas, Claire Brewster carves remarkably intricate images into the landscapes of years passed, breathing movement and life into the two dimensional relics.  Of her work, Brewster says:  “My birds, insects and flowers transcend borders and pass freely between countries with scant regard for rules of immigration or the effects of biodiversity.”  This exhibition will support the Teton Raptor Center.  307.733.0905 or www.diehlgallery.com

Work by Tad Anderson

Work by Tad Anderson

Jackson Hole Art Association – Center for the Arts: Tad Anderson 

“Tad Anderson: A Journey.” This young man is an artistic genius; he also has schizophrenia. He’s an “outsider artist” who should be an “insider.” Art Association Director Mark Nowlin has known Tad all his life.

Of Tad’s work Nowlin says:  “Tad has been on and off medicines. Either situation, on or off, he has drawn. Continuously, for hours on any surface he could find, inside or out, towns or mountains, portraits or dumpsters, he made images. His vision is his own, of whatever strikes his eye, but always true to his vision of the world. A refreshing observation of [Western landscapes’ beauty,] life and truth.”

You can read two Jackson Hole Art Blog pieces on Tad Anderson’s art here and here.  www.jacksonholeartassociation.org

Trio Fine Art: “In Our Valley” 

Three of Jackson’s best-loved plein air artists, Kathryn Mapes Turner, Jennifer L. Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk explore Jackson Hole’s extraordinary outdoor beauty and history in their very fine ways. Trio Fine Art is located four blocks north of the Town Square, at  545 N. Cache. www.triofineart.com 

Trio Fine Art artist Jennifer Hoffman at work. Photo by Tammy Christel

Trio Fine Art artist Jennifer Hoffman at work. Photo by Tammy Christel

Legacy Gallery – Luke Frazier, One Man Show

An earlier work by Luke Frazier ~ NOT included in this show.

An earlier work by Luke Frazier ~ NOT included in this show.

Sporting art is popular with outdoor enthusiasts coast-to-coast, and artist Luke Frazier is one of the most recognized names in the genre. Legacy Gallery presents a reception for the artist and his new work, emphasizing hunting dog paintings and wildlife. The Legacy Gallery is located on the southwest corner of Jackson’s Town Square.  www.legacygallery.com

Master Metalsmith and jeweler Susan Adams at Cayuse Western Americana Gallery

Master Metalsmith and jeweler Susan Adams at Cayuse Western Americana Gallery

Is this a photo or what??? Cayuse Western Americana welcomes Master Metalsmith and jeweler Susan Adams during Palates & Palettes. Adams designs Western-themed vessels hand-raised from sterling, and spurs! She’s won Best in Show at the FAF Western Design Conference. It’s always a good time at Cayuse! www.cayusewa.com

Trailside Galleries and the Jackson Hole Art Auction 

Bert Geer Phillips (1868–1956) Fall Splendor oil on board 22 1/4 x 52 1/4 in Estimate: $300,000–$500,000

Bert Geer Phillips (1868–1956), Fall Splendor. Oil on board, 22 1/4 x 52 1/4 in. Estimate: $300,000–$500,000

Your wildest Western Art dreams come true when it comes to Trailside and Gerald Peters’ Gallery co-production, the Jackson Hole Art Auction. Trailside Gallery, on East Broadway, is showcasing the best of their artist roster during FAF, and upstairs you can preview works from this year’s auction, happening next week! www.trailsidegalleries.com www.gpgallery.com www.jacksonholeartauction.com 

Brent Cotton, at Trailside Galleries. March on the Upper Blackfoot, oil. 32 x 40"

Brent Cotton, at Trailside Galleries. March on the Upper Blackfoot, oil. 32 x 40″

Here’s all you need to know about Amy Ringholz and what she’s up to this year, including Palates and Palettes! She’s got it all on a board: www.ringholzstudios.com

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Astoria Fine Art – Featured Artist Greg Wilson 

Much of wildlife artist Greg Wilson’s time is spent in the mountains in pursuit of the animals around his home in Utah. It is not unusual for Greg to set off for days, with camera and sketchpad in hand, in search of that picturesque scene that he can bring to life in an oil painting. www.astoriafineart.com 

Greg Wilson, "Peeking Over the Other Side," 40x30" Oil

Greg Wilson, “Peeking Over the Other Side,” 40×30″ Oil

Thal Glass Studio – Open Studio

Thal Glass Studio is open by appointment September 7-18, 2016. Please call or email Laurie at thallaurie@gmail.com to schedule your visit! Thal Glass Studio is located at 2800 Linn Drive, Wilson, Wyoming.  www.thalglass.com

Lauri Thal Glass

Lauri Thal Glass

Other galleries to visit during Palates & Palettes: Heather James Fine Art, Mountain Trails, Tayloe Piggott Gallery, David Brookover Gallery, MADE, Wild By Nature, Images of Nature and The West Lives On. 

MORE FALL ARTS FESTIVAL CALENDAR IN THE NEXT JACKSON HOLE ART BLOG! COMING SOON. 

David Brookover. "Layers of Silence," at the David Brookover Gallery.

David Brookover. “Layers of Silence,” at the David Brookover Gallery.