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Posts Tagged ‘Contemporary Art’

Mar
04

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Tonight! 7:00pm until 9:00pm (Chance of Snow 39°F / 27°F).  At Elevated Grounds, West Bank, Wilson, Wyoming.

Arts entrepreneur Lyndsay McCandless presents mixed media paintings by Pilar Bass, visual expressions of her experiences submersed in the natural world. Bass uses textures and marks to capture landscape atmosphere and essence. Encaustics allows the artist to explore mixing a passion for black & white photography and watercolor with the “luscious textures and qualities of the wax.”

CLICK-wcroughtrade

The WAC (via Camellia El-Antably) reminds us that the Visual Arts Fellowship deadline is March 10th. Applications are made through CaFE. More information available on WAC’s web page and also in CaFE; do a search for Wyoming Arts Council Visual Arts Fellowships.

Registration for the wonderful CLICK is now open. CLICK takes place April 4-6th, in Fort Washakie. Good room rates, too! You can find out more about registration and lodging at WAC’s CLICK online registration page.

mapDirectionsLots of changes at the National Museum of Wildlife Art (NMWA). Seventeen-year Western Visions Director Jennifer Lee is moving on. She’ll be working with the Community Resource Center of Jackson Hole, and new museum Director of Programs & Events Becky Kimmel is taking Jen’s place. Western Visions has cut this year’s artist roster by at least 60; I believe you can find a list of participating artists by visiting their website. Becky, if you need a get-up-to-speed primer on artists and wildlife art, you’re about to get one! Good luck!

“I cherish the experiences I have had working for the museum and the wonderful group of people I have known, especially the artists and everyone associated with Western Visions,” notes Lee. I offer Jennifer my respect and thanks for powering Western Visions all these years; it’s a massive job. Contact the new boss, Becky Kimmel, at bkimmel@wildlifeart.org.

Additionally, NMWA’s CEO and Executive Director Jim McNutt has joined the Board at the Art Association. Recently NMWA’s former head of development, Pontier Sackrey, became the new development leader at Jackson’s Center for the Arts, which houses the Art Association.  www.wildlifeart.org  www.artassociation.org  

Apr
05

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Travis Walker, Abbie Miller, Tony Birkholz, Kelly Halpin and Todd Williams (who divides his time between NYC and Jackson Hole) presented their work and perspectives at March 27th’s Culture Front, hosted by Meg Daly. The evening was fascinating not only because of the art we viewed, but because of the ensuing conversation.

The evening’s topic was interpreting the West. How did  young contemporary Jackson artists experience what it is to live here? How are their observations and emotions materializing in their art? I, in my relatively elder-generation way, expected context—a discussion and comparisons. I wondered how the artists made the leap from absorbing Western representational history to transmitting in a contemporary manner. After Walker, Miller, Birkholz, Halpin and Williams made their presentations, Q&A commenced.

“I’d like the artists to talk about the West,” said one audience member.

westI remember thinking the same thing, but I recognize that “talking about the West,” for this generation entails a different vernacular. As all new art generations do. Culture Front’s format is liquid; discussions can and do “fan out.” In more formal settings a presentation’s format is set, the program specific. Two different flows, both enriching.

Abbie Miller’s art is greatly influenced by her east coast and mid-western art schools; her talk focused on those early projects. Perhaps her most “Western” art product is her giant red vinyl piece, “Squeezed Arch,” which resembles Utah’s desert landscape. But Abbie’s roots here run deep; she is a product of our West.

For some, the West is a little short on milk and honey. It can be frightening and unexpected; buffalo are slaughtered, forests succumb to fire and invasive insects, wolves are shot and moose run over. Wildlife collides with mankind, people plummet from the peaks. Ultimately, this place is indescribably beautiful. Our involvement and caring about injustices and environmental imbalance is part of that. The West is “free” in spirit–we come here to throw off  the shackles from our early lives, from the city, from wherever. We have unmatched space, but overcoming the inevitable struggle to survive is difficult. We’re trying everything we can think of. Three local artists with arts day jobs have opened their own space elsewhere in order to bring messages from non-Western cultural centers to Jackson Hole. Artists share space and split up again.

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Nov
01

The Golden Mean, or Golden Ratio, is in every single piece of art Tom Woodhouse creates. Plato believed that if a line was divided into two unequal segments, with the smaller segment relating to the larger in the same way that the larger segment was related to a whole, a special proportional relationship results.

Tom Woodhouse: System As Medium opens at the Art Association on Friday, November 2, with a reception from 5:30-7:30 pm. Woodhouse, the Art Association’s new head of Painting, Drawing and Printmaking, will host an exhibition of his new prints, paintings and sculptures. Earlier this week the Art Association’s Drawing studio was overflowing with Woodhouse’s angular, motion-pitched, brightly colored works. Though he thinks of each painting he does as a landscape, to our eye his work might portray street scenes, people, scary dogs, or be gloriously, wildly abstract.

Woodhouse’s figures started out as specific people, but have become unidentifiable figures in space. Concentratring on composition and color, he analyzes perfect proportion to create aesthetically pleasing compositions. Is there a system for doing that without making the same work over and over again?

“It’s mathematics,” says Woodhouse. “There are seven naturally occurring patterns in nature that reoccur in my work: spirals, whirls, meanders, branching, chaos, 120 degree angles and radial patterns. People respond positively to my shapes because they are based upon what we see in nature, how we exist in the natural world around us. Everyone here has a strong connection to the land, but I try to take that concept and push it about five steps beyond.”

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Oct
15

"Schwabachers Landing," Todd Kosharek

“I focus on the falseness of our Wyoming terrain – the gentle looking river that tore a canyon into the ground, the soft looking horizon of sage, a snarly and abrasive plant, the calming appearance of the winter landscape that is freezing cold. I love the duality of the way we romanticize nature and what nature really is….I focus on the process of searching.” ~ Todd Kosharek

"Canyon," Todd Kosharek

Blue canyons, blue rooms. Walk into Jackson artist’s Todd Kosharek’s house (shared with his wife, dancer Kate Kosharek) and you’ll find yourself surrounded in blues. Kosharek is not singing the blues, he’s painting them. Kosharek, an effusive, upbeat artist with a passion for art history, spends many a day out in Jackson Hole’s landscapes, painting them. Most plein air artists don’t create whole works devoted to shades of blue, but Kosharek does, and it sets his work apart from traditional Western landscape painters. Kosharek ventures out in bright, harsh mid-day light. His goal is not to paint perfectly, but to feel the landscape’s underlying secrets and get paint on his canvas. His approach to what we describe as beautiful is newly, uniquely his own.

Kosharek says this about his large scale, acrylic works: “What I love in painting, both as an artist and as a viewer, is the feeling I get from seeing something that was meticulously created by pigment and brush. I want to see time – time taken by the painter to think, feel and create – but also the element of time, as if the painting is not frozen as an image but will grow and change with me as a person as I grow and change.”

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Apr
16

An opening reception takes place 5-8:00 pm at the Tayloe Piggott Gallery on Wednesday, April 18th, for Jackson artists Susan Thulin and Suzanne Morlock. The joint exhibition, currently on display, remains up through May 15, 2012. It’s a rewarding acknowledgement of Jackson’s art talent when such sophisticated venues are produced on behalf of local artists. Thulin’s highly textural, rhythmically painted canvases and Morlock’s undulating, tactile weavings are well paired.

Morlock’s show title, Pasalubong, is a Filipino word referring to the the tradition of bringing gifts when one goes to visit another person at their home. The visitor, in turn, returns to their own home bearing gifts they’ve received during their visit. The works depart from Morlock’s large installation pieces, and are more intimate in scale so as to be “enclosed” by the gallery’s space.

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