Tag Archives: Film

Rural Violence & Baby Ask: Women, Horses, Mountains, Music & More

“A new year is upon us, marking a time for reflection and anticipation. 2016 was a turbulent year, underscoring the important role art plays in encouraging dialogue between people and reflection upon ourselves.” ~  Art Advisor and Producer Camille Obering 

A heads up: Viewer discretion advised. This clip contains images of a live butchering. I want to post this latest in Obering & Friends “Rural Violence”  film-documented performance piece for the reasons Obering gives, and I’ve reached out to Obering with questions. At post time, the Jackson Hole Art Blog hasn’t received a response.

So I’ll put it to you, readers. The filmmakers wish to address many themes, and here’s the list, directly quoted:

– Death and destruction leading to life and enlightenment.

– Creating awareness that the luxuries many thoughtlessly consume often have a backstory (sic) many reproach (food production, electricity, transportation, cheap anything).

– Humanity’s animalistic (sic) instincts such as dominance, submission, struggle, proliferation, and acknowledging the grey area that exists separating humans from beasts.

– Persecution of the innocent.

– Tension created between what one considers natural verses amoral.

– How sanitized and curated our lives are, and how short our attention spans have become.

– Finding beauty in and meditating on what could be considered brutal.

These are themes we examine constantly; we’re a very aware generation or two; in Jackson alone we have two very fine organic food markets. That’s privilege, and we have a multitude of options when it comes to buying our food. We know that even organic meat gets butchered. How animals live their lives before butchering is most important: are they treated humanely or confined to horrific conditions? What were the circumstances for this animal? How did this creature end up as the “Rural Violence” star? Is it the “innocent?”

Camille Obering on set.

I’m not a vegetarian, but I do question my choices and often think about what took place before I pluck the sanitized package of meat I’ve just bought from the rack. Every day tensions between the haves and have-nots become more visible.  We are a community packed with environmentalists, biologists, forestry experts, wildlife biologists, fishermen, ornithologists and  conservation activists. Many hunt to feed their families.

Yet, for the touring public coming to visit Jackson Hole, any reference to how indigenous cultures survived and hunted are pretty smoothed over. Places you might find full-faced references are the J.H. Historical Societythe Yellowstone and Grand Teton Visitor Centers, the Library, the National Museum of Wildlife Art and National Geographic, just to name a few.

So what is new about these messages? I don’t think the themes are surprising; what’s new is how they’ve been treated in this piece of film. Rather than replicating, how about presenting a true indigenous group carrying out a routine life ritual? Would that get the point across? It’s the conversation I’d have. It’s a question, and raising questions is a primary goal here.

There’s beauty, poetry and reverence in this clip. I’m grateful to receive and share it. Thanks to Planet Jackson Hole and Meg Daly for the link!  www.camilleobering.com

Maddy German

A Song Bird’s “Baby Ask” 

A second locally produced video, “Baby Ask,” is in its final week of fundraising on Kickstarter, looking for dollars to offset costs of a ready-to-roll music video starring local songstress Maddy German. The video premiers at Jackson’s Center for the Arts at 6:00 pm, January 27th. 

German and her Band

Inspired by emotional upheaval, personal growth and, as it turns out, upheaval within the film’s production group and the rupture of German’s relationship with a former beau, the flick has two goals: transferring to film the struggles we experience with our “other selves,” and help launch a larger musical career for German and her crew.

You can catch the “Baby Ask” trailer here:  https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/497811323/baby-ask-a-music-video-from-wyoming

Couture and Textile Art; U.W.’s Art Museum Lets Good Times Roll

Elizabeth Galindo - Handmade fabric with leaves, berries and natural colors.

Elizabeth Galindo – Handmade silk jersey with leaves, berries and natural dyes.

Walking with her through high-end Berkeley and Sacramento galleries and shops, I watched my friend Elizabeth Galindo Roberts, PhD, size up designs, the cut of a fabric, color and details of exquisitely made clothing. Elizabeth, who I’ve known since childhood, creates couture. She has a right to world fame, so rare and extensive are her gifts. Even if she’s not internationally known yet, she is a highly respected artist and academic expert in her field. Sophia Loren has worn her designs. Elizabeth crafts an extraordinary line of textiles that are true products of the earth, her Botanical Peace Textiles. Constructed using flora colors, 100% natural fabrics, dyes and ingredients—such as indigenous berries and leaves—her Botanical Peace Textiles are extraordinary, romantic interpretations of nature.

Galindo Couture - Detail

Galindo Couture – Detail

A film costume researcher, Elizabeth’s credits include 2006’s “The Good Shepard,” 2007’s “There Will Be Blood,” with Daniel Day Lewis and 2006’s “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” starring Brad Pitt. Perhaps her proudest work, though, is her styling for her son’s music video—Gustavo Galindo was a 2011 Grammy nominee for Best Latin Pop, Rock, or Urban Album for his debut album “Entre La Ciudad Y El Mar.” 

Elizabeth Galindo - Silk & Wool Wall Hanging (detail)

Elizabeth Galindo – Silk & Wool Wall Hanging (detail)

Elizabeth is as busy and focused as anyone I’ve known; somewhere between our childhood and our current lives she developed an intense creativity and discerning eye. Perhaps it was always there—she had a lot to say about Barbie’s wardrobe back in the day!  Fashion is risk, and risks she took. Years living in Mexico informed her aesthetic, as did early years in Southern California. At the summer camp we attended together, Elizabeth received a coveted plaque: “Camper of the Week.” I didn’t. I came in third at the summer’s end “Activity Contest”; Elizabeth took second. She understands what it means to build a profile and get your work out into the world. Still, when I saw her creations “in the flesh” this summer, I was stunned by their exquisite beauty and passionate dedication evident in every piece.

Last year Elizabeth earned her Masters of Fine Arts and a PhD in Performance Studies with an emphasis in Film and Fashion at the University of California, Davis. She travels extensively to lecture, and she has “studied and earned several proficiency degrees in silk screening, hand blocking and embroidery work on fabrics at the Fuji Institute in Florence, Italy.” On top of it all, Elizabeth is an adjunct professor at two universities, conducting her courses on line.

Elizabeth Galindo Botanical Fabric

Elizabeth Galindo Botanical Fabric

Elizabeth has fun with fashion; she regularly posts her favorite trends and designs to social media, and her followers delight in her sense of style. Elizabeth’s ability to move back and forth between designing the finest quality, custom-fitted garments, marked by distinct detail—very time consuming to create—to melding rich, loose colors with natural elements is quite unusual and the sign of a high artist.

While visiting Elizabeth in California we spotted a sweater she advised me to buy. If I’m smart, I’ll take her advice. www.elizabethgalindo.com

Elizabeth Galindo - Bias Cut Burnt Velvet Gown

Elizabeth Galindo – Bias Cut Burnt Velvet Gown

gala.logowebLet the Good Times Roll!

A wonderful opportunity to bridge the distance between Jackson’s art scene and the University of Wyoming’s and Wyoming Arts ever-evolving, visionary arts culture is to get yourself down to U.W.’s Art Museum’s fundraising black tie Gala “Laizzes les Bons Temps Rouler!”  The event takes place Saturday, October 26th, 2013 in the Yellowstone Ballroom Wyoming Union, at U.W.  The evening’s rollicking tone will be set by the hippest band in the state, “Jackson 6.”  

All proceeds benefit the exhibition, education and collection programs at the U.W. Art Museum–a spectacular museum; its galleries remind me of San Francisco’s De Young. Sponsorship levels vary—individual tickets are $175, and there are multiple “table” opportunities.

“The Art Museum and its outreach programs not only impact the quality of life around Wyoming; the preschool through college education programs strengthen student problem-solving and critical thinking skills — a great benefit to our future workforce,” say this year’s gala chairs Chris and Kathryn Boswell.

The party starts at 6:00 pm!  Fine hors d’oeuvres, an open bar and silent auction are all part of the fun…which promises to be memorable. I would love to be there!  For information, phone 307.766.3477. Read a little bit more about the evening’s events here.

 

Wavelengths & Enlightenment

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There’s nothing about Jackson art in this post!

Starting off here with a sensitive commentary on the film “Quartet”. Its story line and ensemble acting were so engaging, but the biggest stars of that film were its magnificent trees. So many scenes set amidst extraordinary, historic, spreading ancient oaks and forest. Shelter, sustenance. Their almost imperceivable sounds, whispers.

A friend wrote:

“At times, Tammy, the tree world from the point of view of being in the air among their branches, feeling the ways in which they influence the movement of air and light from above, softening always this space overhead for us on the ground, opens the feeling that collectively trees must be very advanced life forms that have achieved something like enlightenment.”

51SPlPHuYHL._SL500_AA280_Joni Mitchell (listen!) wrote:

“If you’re drivin’ into town with a dark cloud above you/dial in the number who’s bound to love you/oh honey you turn me on, I’m a radio/I’m a country station/I’m a little bit corny/I’m a wildwood flower waving for you/broadcasting tower waving for you…..” 

It’s something about sound and airwaves and the feeling of being connected and collected that made me put those two writings together.

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Bye, Fourth Wall! Thal’s Glass Balls; New Vibes

I’ll truly miss Culture Front gatherings this winter, and was glad to see such a full room at last week’s final event for the season.

In case you couldn’t make it, the evening featured dancers from Hole Dance Films, a Dancers’ Workshop  partner. Hole Dance makes dance films–the action is dance. October 25th’s demonstration shined a light on how dancers are directed and prompted for the purposes of film. Participating dancers were given a series of exercises and improvisational opportunities, which they in turn performed for the audience. Just as folks were wondering when the talk might begin, the “talk” suddenly came lyrically into being: dancers came to life, moving through the crowd and around the space.

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Culture Front Features Dance; Get In Here & Draw!

Still from "Elusive Stranger” by Hole Dance Films.

Culture Front’s final live event of the season features Jackson’s Hole Dance Films performing artists, delving into “Live Process,” says Culture Front director and moderator Meg Daly. This season-ending event takes place Thursday, October 25, 5:30-7 p.m. at The Rose cocktail lounge. The event is free and open to the public; you must be at or over the age of 21 to attend….this IS a bar, folks!

There’s no Jackson artist getting more media exposure right now than Kathryn Mapes Turner. “Live Process” will take the evening’s audience behind the scenes of the making of a dance film, a project about Turner’s family history, and her legacy as the sole woman in a big ranching family—ultimately, it’s about her connection to place. Phrasing, setting, theme and story create cohesive films–this film has dance at its core. Audience members will have the opportunity to observe a current work-in-progress and offer feedback.

Hole Dance Films specializes in dance film and is a non-profit program of Dancers’ Workshop, artistically directed by Carrie Richer and Kate W. Kosharek.

“This is a different project for us,” Kosharek said. “In the past we have started with a simple concept or abstract idea. With this project we have a more complex approach because it is a documentary of someone’s life.”

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