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Posts Tagged ‘Grand Teton National Park’

Feb
28

In a few months I will be moving back to the east coast. Family calls. The length of time I’ll be away is temporary and open-ended. I’m grateful, more than I can express, for the loving, caring and supportive messages I’ve received from so many of you. I carry you all in my heart. Posts may “spread out” for a while as I manage logistics, and the Blog may change its focus or form ~~~ but it’s not disappearing. We’re joined, and we’ll remain joined!  Okay, I might write a poem if I keep on. It wouldn’t be a good poem, so time to write about what’s happening in Jackson!

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

The Jackson Hole Art Auction is rapidly receiving an inventory of fine masterworks to  be auctioned off Saturday, September 14, 2014.  This John Clymer is remarkable! Something about it quickens my pulse. Important artists already represented in this year’s auction: Oscar Berninghaus, John Clymer, Bob Kuhn, Ken Riley and Richard Schmid. Schmid’s diminutive painting of carnations was the surprise star of last year’s auction, selling many times over its estimate. Kuhn’s “Resting Cat”, a 22 x 42 acrylic on board, is estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

“The painting was the last Prix de West entry the artist completed in his lifetime, and was awarded the Major General and Mrs. Don Pittman Wildlife Award,” notes the auction.

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42"

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42″

Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan emphasizes that the public is welcome to stop by the auction offices to learn more about this year’s event. As always, the auction is seeking fine art consignments; I expect offerings to be welcomed into the summer season. For a complimentary, confidential evaluation please call 866-549-9278, visit www.jacksonholeartauction.com or stop by the offices in Trailside Galleries at 130 East Broadway, Jackson, WY — or 7330 Scottsdale Mall, Scottsdale, AZ. www.jacksonholeartauction.com

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

“The Straw That Broke” is an “environmental thriller” written by Jackson’s Gregory Zeigler; the same author who brought us his recreated tale of Steinbeck’s “Travels with Charlie.” It’s Steinbeck’s 112th birthday as I write this. The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s own Jane Lavino created the cover art, and it’s awesome! What up, girl?  We need a Lavino exhibition! Promotional copy for Zeigler’s book sums up the plot: “A young scientist and free spirit, Lyn Burke, gets caught up in a battle between ecoterrorists and corrupt public officials over water in the drought-stricken desert Southwest. Lyn’s disappearance causes police officer Susan Brand and private investigator Jake Goddard to rush to her aid. Abduction, deceit, and murder threaten a cataclysm that places the entire region in jeopardy.” 

Wow, I’m thinking “Longmire!” If the book is as good as that TV series, it’s going to have you on the edge of your seat. Congrats to Greg and Jane! Check it out: www.gzeiglerbooks.com

Tammy Callens - Through the Aspen Grove - 36x18" Oil

Tammy Callens – Through the Aspen Grove – 36×18″ Oil

Plein air painter and portraitist Tammy Callens has a show of new works at Mountain Trails Gallery, in Jackson. Callens feels these paintings break new ground for her as an artist. I’ve always been a fan. Her work is romantic, impressionistic, marked by realism and personal. Callens has another quality: she’s humble about her work. I feel her intimate landscapes are some of the most captivating in town.

Callens sparked the idea of  pro-actively inviting children to participate in plein air painting demonstrations. She did this unwittingly, two summers ago during one of our “Artists in the Environment” events in Grand Teton National Park. Callens painted a difficult scene with great skill, and her most ardent admirers were young people visiting the Park, making their own memories by painting the wilderness explored on their summer vacations. It doesn’t get better than that! www.tammycallens.com 

Dec
04
Jennifer Hoffman - Flat Creek Breakdown

Jennifer Hoffman – Flat Creek Breakdown

Bushwhacking through dense underbrush and tangled bunches of new and old-growth forest one afternoon with two of the three Trio Fine Art artists, I finally “got” what determination means when it comes to plain air painting. I’ve loved and been close to plain air for decades, but rarely get a chance to go with painters to protected, coveted painting sites. This day was different, and following the footsteps of Jennifer Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk as they marked a painting spot on protected land can be defined, without hesitation, as adventure.

When bellowing bull elk bear down on you, suggesting you’d be better off moving some yards to the south, you pick up your paint box and move it. Hoffman tells the story of that day much better than I; We ventured out on the Ladd property. You think you know what you’re doing, but this valley is always full of surprises…read the story here.

Kathryn Turner - Mead Ranch

Kathryn Turner – Mead Ranch

View22: Painting Jackson Hole’s Open Spaces is a collaboration and fundraiser art exhibition featuring the works of artists Kathryn Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk. The exhibition’s opening reception takes place Friday, December 6th, at Trio Fine Art on North Cache. Time is 5-8 pm, with artists’ remarks beginning at 6pm. The exhibition remains up through December 21st. A portion of exhibition sales benefit the Jackson Hole Land Trust.

Drawing inspiration from Thomas Moran, the painter responsible for capturing Yellowstone’s rugged beauty so magnificently that Congress declared it and Grand Teton as national parks, View 22 celebrates the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s conservation efforts that have so dramatically affected our open spaces, and works to further cement the eternal bond between art and nature.

Bill Sawczuk - Hardeman Barn

Bill Sawczuk – Hardeman Barn

This past summer and early fall saw Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk visiting an array of preserved open spaces, often not available to the public, and painting their landscapes, wildlife and historic valley structures. Besides benefitting the Land Trust, this show shines a light on special land tracts many of us don’t get a chance to see. Or, if you have had the luck to visit them, you may view each of these places anew. Eighteen protected properties were captured en plein air for the project; 23,000 acres have been protected by the Land Trust.

“As full-time landscape painters in Jackson Hole, we have a vital interest in the preservation of open space within our valley. It is the natural beauty found in wide open spaces that inspires our creativity. Through sharing our interpretations of the landscape, we hope to shine a spotlight on the importance of conservation efforts made possible by the Jackson Hole Land Trust,” said Turner, Hoffman, and Sawczuk.

A View 22 produced video of the artists, their activities and several locations they visited can be viewed here.

Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews is thrilled with Trio Fine Art’s commitment. “Through Trio’s artists’ deep understanding of how the valley’s protected open spaces affect their daily lives, and [through] their talent and creativity, they’ve shown us all a very special view of [the Land Trust's] work.”

For more information contact Trio Fine Art at 307.734.4444, or phone the Land Trust’s Leslie Steen at 307.733.4707. Email: leslie@jhlandtrust.org   www.triofineart.com  www.jhlandtrust.org  

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Aug
07
Lee Carlman Riddell

Lee Carlman Riddell

Lee Carlman Riddell has always loved drawing, painting and outdoor adventures. For 23 years she and her husband, photographer Ed Riddell, marketed outdoor adventure and tourism businesses in their former lives as the owners of Riddell Advertising where they produced countless books, trail guides and posters for the Grand Teton Association; they share similar histories with other great American national parks. Now, setting up her easel offers a time of concentration on shapes, textures and colors as Lee paints the landscapes she loves. Join her as she executes her second “Artist in Residency” in Grand Teton National Park, August 12-17 from 1-5 pm each day, at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitor Center.

“I wanted my time there to be interactive with visitors, so we used some ‘How To Draw Animals’ books that the Grand Teton Association (GTA) offers for sale,” says Riddell. “We set up a table with six spaces for people of all ages to draw and paint watercolors in July. It was a huge success, and we plan on doing the same thing this month.” Kids can also sit on boulders outside the Center, she says, and she admires the GTA’s excellent selection of appropriate books and related items reflecting the Park’s beauty.

Grand Teton National Park and my connections to it have profoundly influenced my life. I met Ed because he loved the Park and managed to find a position as the first marketing director of Teton Science School in the fall of 1974. We met there.” says Riddell.

Lee Carlman Riddell - Buck Mountain

Lee Carlman Riddell – Buck Mountain

Spending time at the Visitors Center holds great meaning; board members for 12 years, she and Ed participated in the building’s site selection, the choice of an architect and exhibit design team, and multiple aspects of construction. Ed helped visualize the concept for the in-ground river videos inside the Center. The Riddells now serve on the Resource Council for the Foundation; Lee Riddell’s wish to “give back” to the park she loves so much continues.

A young artist at work - Courtesy Lee Carlman Riddell

A young artist at work – Courtesy Lee Carlman Riddell

“To now have the privilege of being the GTA Artist-in-Residence for two weeks this summer is like coming full circle,” says Riddell. “I have truly enjoyed spending time there, seeing how people engage with the Park staff, move through the exhibits and respond to the ambient sounds of bird calls during quieter moments at the Center. Visitors tell me that the Center is so cool!”

Riddell and visitors never tire of the Center’s streaming light and huge windows affording sweeping views of the Tetons, the tactile animal fur exhibits and quotes by writers, artists and philanthropists deeply connected to place. Riddell is a former partner in Trio Fine Art, teaches painting, and continues her work as one of the finest graphic designers in our region. Her beautiful paintings can be found at the exclusive showroom of WRJ Associates, in downtown Jackson. www.leeriddell.com    

Wendell Field

Wendell Field

When an elderly Laos physician observed painter Wendell Field at work, the doctor remarked: “Ah, an artist. The artist is never a prisoner of society.” The remark echoes Field’s artistic philosophy and path. Saturday, August 10th, Field becomes the latest “Artist in the Environment,” painting en plein air at the historic Cunningham Cabin in Grand Teton National Park. Field will paint 2:00-5:00 pm, and as always, “Artists in the Environment” is free and open to the public.  

Whether he interprets it this way, I’m not certain; but the view has been expressed that Field’s solitary yurt habitat lifestyle is similar to that of the pioneer J.Pierce Cunningham’s. His cabin—slowly sinking into the landscape, living out its natural life—is historically marked, and one of the few remaining homesteads in the valley that date from the 1880′s. Field is inspired by world cultures—he’s painted and created exquisite prints of Himalayan villages;  his views of Snow King and our town resemble his Tibetan paintings. The spirit never deserts him. And all the YOUNG single ladies love Wendell!

“A landscape translated through the painter’s hand may remind us of a stillness lost within ourselves,” says Field. Cunningham Cabin Historic Site is north of Jackson on highways 26/89/191; take the first turnout on the left just beyond Triangle X Ranch. “Artists in the Environment” is presented by the Grand Teton Association, always connecting people, art and the Park.  www.grandtetonpark.org 

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Remy Milosky - Couch Man

Remy Milosky – Couch Man

Young Jackson contemporary artist (he’s alive, he’s painting and it’s new!) Remy Milosky hangs his first solo exhibition, featuring over 100 original oil paintings and drawings, at Intencións Gallery, Jackson, WY.  Here’s the catch: Milosky’s exhibition, “Art is Life,” literally showcases ALL the artist’s work created these past five years, and the show runs ONLY one night, August 10th, 6-10:00 pm. 

As a child the artist promised himself to create one piece of art a day—-I don’t know Milosky’s age, but if a life retrospective were at hand it would fill every nook and corner of Jackson! Enough work exists from the past five years for a very big show.

The artist’s goal is simple and straightforward: to give everyone who visits the opportunity to own original art. Reasonable prices, diversity of subject and style should mean that there is something for everyone. “I have always dreamt of [my first] solo show, and by allowing me my own terms, Intencións is helping me fulfill this dream,” says Milosky. For more information, email madelinef.ashley@gmail.com OR remymilosky@gmail.com.  Phone contacts:  307-690-2409 and 307-690-6545. Website:  www.remysart.com

Through December, filmmaker Valerie Schramm hosts “Movie Night at the Library,” 7-9:00 pm every second Friday of the month. Each film showcases a new release from the Film Movement, a curator and distributer for award-winning films from festivals around the world. Post-film discussions. Friday, August 9th, “Shun Li and the Poet,” a drama directed by Andrea Segre, will screen. Italian and Mandarin; not sure about subtitles!  Free.  www.tclib.org

 

 

 

Jul
18

376834_4296472412245_1278850541_nThis image, taken last summer of a smiling Susan Chambers, former Grand Teton Association board member and Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painter volunteer, reflects the spirit of these wonderful weeks artists have spent in Grand Teton National Park and the Jackson Hole area. So many gifted plein air painters creating work celebrating the Park, all the while inspiring one another.

Anyone watching this dedicated, close-knit group gets goosebumps. And now the big day is here: Thursday, July 18th, beginning at 7:00 pm, the Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters (RMPAP) hold a grand Opening Reception at the Craig Thomas Discovery & Visitors Center, in Moose, WY. It’s an emotional night, a triumphant night and a night filled with promise not only for these artists, but for their partners, the Grand Teton Association (GTA) and Grand Teton National Park (GTNP). A special section devoted to the works of the late plein air painter Greg McHuron will be on view.

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Last Saturday, I and dozens of others watched as three of this year’s artists—Stephen C. Datz, Kathryn Mapes Turner and Jeanne MacKenzie—conducted a free plein air demonstration at Oxbow Bend. There may not be a more beautiful GTNP overlook. And today, just prior to writing this post, I bumped into a plein air devotee who attended Saturday’s paint out. She spoke at great length about the pleasures of watching the artists paint, and how it inspires her to continue to work on her own painting.

photo-7What she and so many others experienced was watching artists take in landscape details we “mortals” notice, but don’t often register at the depth plein air painters do. We’re talking about vistas extending endless miles. The ever-changing colors of the river as clouds and sun moved across the sky. The way Mt. Moran’s reflection shifted on the water’s surface. How a mountain’s face changed as minutes ticked by. An infinite spectrum of greens reside in the grasses, sage, trees and wildflowers and riparian growth so verdant and dominant in that area. Oxbow waters are can be a perfect mirror—a moment later they ripple, sending the message that a family of geese, a pelican, or a paddle dipped in the water are nearby. Water, snowcapped mountains, wildlife, the rushes, each flower, each pine needle is a world unto itself—-unseen by so many of us, but the very exhuberance of life for artists.

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These artists have had their own experiences while visiting GTNP. Storms break out, thunder claps and lightning strikes. Hail happens. Moose appear out of nowhere and charge an artist’s easel. Ravens conduct extended loud and fierce debates.

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Have you had the opportunity to observe RMPAP artists at work?  Watching artists paint is mesmerizing; time flies. If you’ve not had the chance, I encourage you to visit the Craig Thomas Center on the occasion of this year’s Grand Opening. Take in the myriad, painterly interpretations of this place. I’ve viewed about a third of the works—the diversity of style and perspective is impressive, and the number of works on exhibit will triple come opening night.

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And don’t forget: Saturday, July 20th, beginning at 9:00 am, approximately 25 RMPAP artists will hold a two-hour Quick Draw at Menor’s Ferry, GTNP. Artists will work on site, and a fixed price sale follows immediately after, at 11:00 am. A “Grand” opportunity to watch over two dozen artists at work, recording what they see and feel around them, in the moment, in nature. Menor’s Ferry is one of the most accessible, gentle corners of GTNP, and I predict some wonderful work will result from the morning’s efforts.

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ALL events are free and open to the public; all are family friendly and a portion of “Plein Air for the Park” sale proceeds benefit the GTA and GTNP. To see both RMPAP and GTA’s “Artists in the Environment” flourishing programs makes a heart swell with pride, pleasure and love. For a full list of participating artists, click here. See you there!   www.rmpap.org   www.grandtetonpark.org  

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Jul
11
David Brookover - "Harold and Maude"

David Brookover – “Harold and Maude”

As I sat in front of Jackson photographer David Brookover’s giant iMac (the biggest screen I’ve ever seen!) every image he showed me impressed. Brookover rarely does anything small-scale, unless it’s due to a collector’s wish to purchase a print of more compact proportions. He happily accommodates, but it’s a rare event.

Brookover’s latest, stunning images are of Andulusian horses, those magnificent, “royal,” and relatively rare steeds of Spanish origin. Recently Brookover took an extended trip to Spain to visit several renowned Andalusian horse ranches. Brookover is captivated by their speed, size, proportions, spirit and how the horses’ manes and color change as they age; the arc of a horse’s neck. Often, as he photographed them, the horses ran directly at Brookover. He’s captured them at rest, in full and abandoned gallop, and each photograph is a distinct equine portrait. As I write this, Brookover’s Spain images aren’t yet hanging in the gallery, but his photographs of Andalusians in South Carolina are on view. 

David Brookover - "Four Off"

David Brookover – “Four Off”

“I flew into Madrid and traveled all over Andalusia, Spain. I must have photographed at least 50 stallions. When the horses are out, they really want to run,” says Brookover. Pointing to one image, he describes the horse as being as svelt, fast and sleek as a greyhound.

“His skin, his coat looks wet, but it’s not—it reminded me of a seal’s skin,” recalls the photographer. Brookover encountered one animal that was “almost an albino,” a past world champion and very rare. Brookover photographed the horse against stacks of hay and against the weathered wall of 300-year old barn. Brookover’s ability to juxtapose and expose each texture can make one feel the hay in your hand, or a barn’s peeling white plaster.

David Brookover - "Sugar Cubes"

David Brookover – “Sugar Cubes”

Brookover took countless photographs, visiting 10 ranches with a translator, and each rancher welcomed Brookover. He will painstakenly edit them down to a selection of around five images to exhibit. This July he’ll do the printing, then frame the images up…and he has some extraordinary framing ideas brewing. Colors are saturated, printed on bamboo paper which allows for a rich image without it “hitting you in the face.”

“These horses are beautiful, and they know they’re beautiful,” says Brookover. “They were great. The most difficult thing was lighting and getting them to be still when they’re outside. Because when they’re out—-whoosh!  They’re gone. These animals are gorgeous, and I can hardly wait to have the photographs up.”

Brookover’s gallery carries black and white, silver gelatin, platinum and his ever-popular color landscapes. In addition to the new Andalusian photographs, Brookover’s images of Yellowstone wildlife are not to be missed. Brookover’s aesthetic merges classic photographic technique with surprising, fresh images of our native species.  www.brookovergallery.com

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Saturday, July 13th, the Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters and the Grand Teton Association’s “Artists in the Environment” merge. Plein air painters representing both groups will give a free plein air demonstration, 2-5:00 pm, at Oxbow Bend, Grand Teton National Park.  The event is free and open to the public~~and the views are spectacular. An informal Q&A with the artists will also take place. Artists are RMPAP President Stephen C. Datz, Kathryn Mapes Turner and Jeanne MacKenzie.  www.rmpap.org  www.grandtetonpark.org

Louie

Louie

“The sweetness of dogs (fifteen)

What do you say, Percy? I am thinking

of sitting out on the sand to watch

the moon rise. Full tonight.

So we go

and the moon rises, so beautiful it

makes me shudder, makes me think about

time and space, makes me take

measure of myself: one iota

pondering heaven. Thus we sit,

I thinking how grateful I am for the moon’s

perfect beauty and also, oh! How rich

it is to love the world. Percy, meanwhile,

leans against me and gazes up into

my face. As though I were

his perfect moon.” ~ Mary Oliver

Louie Christel~~~There will never be a sweeter, more perfect soul. We miss you so much, our hearts have big holes, and when we look at the moon, or remember you positioning yourself on the ottoman for a backrub, or surveying the hayfields, or following the UPS truck for a biscuit, or running with Jesse, or nudging at a rock shifting below the dock, or resting yourself in the shady, cool sand grasses, we will love you.  Thank you for being in our lives.