Tag Archives: Jackson Hole Center for the Arts

Fresh Lots at J.H. Art Auction; A Kansas Art Tale

Edgar Payne, Navajo Scouting Party, 24×38″ Oil. Estimate: $400,000 – $600,000

Fresh to the art market: no matter how important an artist’s work, if passed around the auction circuit too often, its value tarnishes. Flip city. That’s why the 2017 Jackson Hole Art Auction   elation over works new to the market is understandable: six oils by American illustrator W.H.D. Koerner. The works come straight from a private collection “with direct descent from the artist.”

W.H.D. Koerner (1878–1938) Citizens of the Law (1931) oil on canvas, 30 x 36″  Estimate: $75,000–$125,000

Koerner works include “Citizens of the Law,” shown above, and “New Horizons,” a “classic pioneer scene.” Both works estimate at $75,000 – $125,000. Koerner’s “Fly Fishing,” “The Bullring,” “The Price of the Old Northwest,” and “Indian Territory Demand for Tribute” round out the Koerner lots. Together these works comprise a vivid and compelling profile of the characters, times, challenges and passions of the Old West.

Edgar Payne, Carl Rungius, Robert Bateman, Tucker Smith; you’ll find works by all these iconic Western artists on the Jackson Hole Art Auction website.   No matter where they set up their easels, countless contemporary artists list the great Edgar Payne as a significant influence in their own work. 

The Jackson Hole Art Auction caps Jackson’s annual Fall Arts Festival, and is a co-production of the Gerald Peters and Trailside Galleries. A phenomenal Western Art market success, this will be the auction’s 11th year offering the finest works by living and deceased masters. The auction, now a destination in itself, continues to invite fine art consignments. Once again, the auction takes place over the course of two consecutive days: September 15th and 16th, 2017, at the Center for the Arts in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. For information, contact Auction Coordinator Madison Webb, via Tel: 866-549-9278 | Fax: 307-732-1600 or at www.jacksonholeartauction.com.  

Now, a brief “return from vacation” note. If you read the New York Times  Arts Section, you may have seen March 25th’s article “Arts Without Funding? It Can Be Done, Kansas Says.” 

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Journalist Mitch Smith’s  article tells the story of Kansas’ Hays Arts Council. Its director, Brenda Meder, cuts corners wherever possible in order to save money and funnel cash into the arts. She scrubs the toilets, she makes the reception appetizers, she’s increased membership and organizes quarterly art walks “in the brick-paved downtown, where storefronts transform into makeshift galleries that draw hundreds of spectators from Hays and beyond.”

In Hays, support comes from Democrats and Republicans. It is, says one politically involved citizen, “part of our DNA here. And that’s hard to replicate in other communities.”

This is a story about a Midwest arts community making concessions, but their arts scene remains strong. It’s a great profile. And, man, look at this art! It’s fantastic! Read the story here.

Courtesy Hays Arts Council

Hats Off! It’s “Whodunnit” Number 10!

I know Whodunnit!

What’s so special and enduring about the Art Association’s annual “Whodunnit?” fundraiser? One participating artist, Borbay, immediately piped up with his take on the exhibition:

“Despite being a full-time artist in Manhattan for seven years, I never established a meaningful relationship with an art organization. That changed completely when I moved to Victor, connected with Shari Brownfield, Todd Hanna, Chas Marsh, Mark Nowlin and The Art Association of Jackson Hole. They hosted my first show out West in the Summer of 2016, and since, I’ve witnessed the incredible impact they have made on our community. When the wonderful Jill Callahan mentioned the Whodunnit show, I was happy to contribute. I’m excited to see who ends up with my piece, and, from what I’ve heard, it’s one helluva party!”

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Get Your Art Up and OUT; Cayuse’s Centennial

Borbay and Friend

Borbay and Friend

What percentage of artists working in Jackson Hole have pierced their immediate circle of collectors and taken their art to a new level? Branding happens when you’ve “arrived,” and nobody is a brand before that leap. Jackson’s art market is one of the strongest in the nation, recognized primarily for its historical and contemporary Western Art.

What if you’re not a native Westerner? What if you’ve moved here looking for answers, searching for a supportive venue? Perhaps you’ve been here forever, respected and recognized. Still, the art world at large doesn’t quite know it, and you’re not a household name. You’re selling, but you want to sell more. No sugar daddies (or mommies) around, no private plane connections, no trust fund….Maybe you’re shy.

 Just as an improved diet and better sleep will elevate health… so too can artists empower themselves by embracing necessary entrepreneurial techniques. Competition between artists for collectors is unnecessary. ~ Borbay

Borbay and Friends to the resue!

On Friday, July 29th, 1:30 – 3:00 pm at the Art Association’s Gallery, Borbay, Ben Roth and Claudia Bueno will talk on the topic “How to Get Your Work Beyond Jackson Hole.” The session is free. Heck, I wish I could be there!

 

Claudia Bueno

Claudia Bueno

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Coach Party!

Yee haw!  The Jackson Hole Center for the Arts and 1391805197_1Jackson Hole Historical Society & Museum are putting on “A Western Winter’s Eve,” a night of music, dancing and fun — and Jen Ten filmmaking — at the Center’s lobby and theater this Friday, March 14th. Tix are $15, on sale now at the Center.  Here’s the schedule:

6 – 7:30pm | Two-step to The Stagecoach Band Live in the Lobby with dance instruction by Dancers’ Workshop

7:30 – 8:30pm | See The “The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads” on the BIG SCREEN

8:30pm – 10:30pm | Disco on Center Stage after the film, boogie down with The Spartan from WYOBASS

The night’s festivities is, they say, the FINAL opportunity to see  “The Stagecoach Bar: An American Crossroads” on the big screen in Jackson. Tennican, the woman behind the film, is also debuting a new short film. “The Stagecoach” is going national, to be distributed by American Public Television.

“Creating this film was a community effort with over 200 individuals, foundations and businesses supporting the JHHSM’s project through tax-deductible donations,” say the evening’s producers. The Stagecoach Band, great food, and dancing (for pro and non-pro two-steppers) is all part of the fun. Costumes encouraged, but not required!  Check it out on Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/events/389756964493047

Courtesy Wyoming Arts. Photo: David Swift

Courtesy Wyoming Arts. Photo: David Swift

 

 

 

 

 

Sandbox Center for the Arts; Traveling Tintype Studio

Walter Hood

Walter Hood outlines the Sandbox Project at Jackson’s Center for the Arts. ~ T. Christel

“We’ll talk about its capacity, trees, theaters, animals, water, earth, habitat, the mountains and about the community, all within this setting.”  ~~ Walter Hood

Launching February 14th, 2014: www.sandbox.jhcenterforthearts.org! That’s where the public gets the chance to chime in on how the Center for the Arts’ ambitious back lawn landscape design project might evolve. Nationally noted urban landscape designer Walter Hood, overseeing the project in partnership with Steve Dynia, gave Jacksonites a chance to play in the sand three nights in a row; participants used specially constructed sandboxes and props to define what they envision for the open space.

“We’ll look primarily at the expanded architectural program with Steve Dynia; the sandboxes are about the landscape,” said Hood. “This is a landscape, not a park, or a garden. It’s open. We also understand that the cadence, how you move through Jackson, is a grid. This is a very urban place. We have a lot of houses, a lot of cars, a lot of parking, a lot of these issues. One of the things we hope we can do…is make the space more successful for people moving through the neighborhood. We do think Snow King can come down to us by taking back the streets and the alleys. The alleys are really important. As you move north and south through the alleys, they are beautiful. As you can see here, the alleys have been largely erased. So how can we bring back a lot of this (structural) morphology?”

Hood asked the group to consider a long list of factors as they went about their designs. The first was that this space is NOT Jackson’s Town Square, and duplicating the Square is not on the agenda. But what kind of a landscape can this open space become?

A detail of Walter Hood's landscape design for the deYoung Museum - photo by T. Christel

A detail of Walter Hood’s landscape design for the deYoung Museum – photo by T. Christel

“The Center really needs to think about its building program, its architecture. It would be great to have artists come here 24/7, to have studios where they can make art. Where would you put the building?  If I put it out there in the landscape, it’s going to have a consequence on the landscape. We’ll see how we can use architecture to make something really powerful. Some ideas are a clubhouse where people can meet, an exhibition space, a multipurpose place. We think this will be a hybrid place, with things nested in one another,” said Hood. “Cafes, other permanent and temporal spaces within the building envelope. [In the West and Jackson] there exist successful pieces of architecture that elucidate the landscape. Steve is very talented — just being down one story, look how that mountain comes out and the middle ground disappears, a beautiful thing.  How can we expand upon that?”

Ideally, artists (who aren’t already) would be inspired to make work here. Sculptural landscape is a “yes.” Programmed landscape, a “no.”  Building upon the idea of an outdoor theater, Greek or Roman, embracing or inscribing, are interesting. Multi-purpose uses that might change with the seasons, be temporary or permanent, should be considered; Hood recalled Candra Day’s constructing yurts on the lawn.

photo-2One could look at a land form and see a lot of things, Hood remarked. A child may see a playhouse, an artist a place to bang steel, a dancer a natural stage. Forms can inspire and begin to say something about the landscape—inspiring, even in mud season.

“Can we do things like add trees, and then take them away, like a clear-cut,” Hood  asked. “Think about when the snow is here, when it’s not here. Can you do something in the wintertime? It might be ice skating, it might be mud wrestling! But whatever it is, it should embrace the landscape. We also know there are residential areas on our perimeter, and when events happen some elements may have to be mitigated, like noise. Do we want to make walls, edges?”

Lastly, said Hood, how do we bring our urban grid into this space? Again, the alleys are important, as they allow possible connections to the nearby church, the mountain, and other points immediately around the Center.

In a brief Q&A, it was confirmed that the Town of Jackson owns the land and is providing the Center a long-term lease; the Town, said one representative, is “very open” to this project. When asked about how the Center might draw people from Jackson’s Town Square to the new Center space, Hood responded that the idea is in the hopper, and brainstorming was the point of these workshops.

“We’re not looking for scheme A, B or C; we simply want to draw on ideas, so we can begin to think about the space and the Center,” emphasized Hood. All ideas are great ideas!”  www.jhcenterforthearts.org

(PS: I hope Mark Berry is smiling!)

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn - photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

Snake River Reverse Project, adjacent to J.H. Center for the Arts Lawn – photo & art courtesy Bland Hoke

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Event: Lindsey Ross’s Traveling Tintype Studio

Place: The Rose/Pink Garter Theatre

Date: Thursday Jan 23, 5-10pm

Bonus: Family portraits: 5-7pm

From Lyndsay McCandless: Lindsey Ross singular, tintype portraits are the real deal: 19th century technology wet plate collodion, a photographic process popular from 1850’s-1880’s, that documented the American Civil War and America’s Western expansion. Ross uses raw materials to create the photographic emulsion on an aluminum plate. While the emulsion is still wet, Ross exposes the plate to the subject using a century old camera and prolonged exposure times. Ross develops the image in a darkroom on site; portraits appear within a minute.

Tintypes are archivally stable, so they create an instant heirloom and art object. Because the exposures are long, subjects are encouraged to relax, be still and be present as their image is made,” says McCandless. “The slow process often brings out subtle, expressive similarities between family members. Come experience this historic and beautiful process!”  For information on print prices, email lyndsayrowan@gmail.com.

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