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Posts Tagged ‘Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival’

Greg Woodard Indian Head Penny, Edition of 17 Bronze 36 x 30 x 16 inches

Greg Woodard
Indian Head Penny, Edition of 17
36 x 30 x 16 inches

At Altamira Fine Art, September 1-10th are exhibition days devoted to artists exploring Native American (or “Indian,” as John Byrne Cooke insists we should be writing), culture and themes. Sculptor Greg Woodard has been subtly, and not so subtly creating visions of myths and symbols of a West that flourished before white men destroyed almost every vestige of the Indian nations. His newest show, Breakthrough, gives us more of Woodard’s emotional, heroic sculptures erupting from the earth, and writhing, proud and primal portrayals of Native Americans and Western wildlife.

Woodard, a master falconer, says he allows his sculptures to develop naturally—there are no preconceptions. Each edition reveals its own hue and texture.

“I try to achieve a unique gesture, and use the process that a piece goes through getting cast to my advantage. I’m very involved at the foundry,” says Woodard. “I chase the waxes and do every patina by hand.”

Woodard's Bison Coin sculpture at NMWA. Photo by Tammy Christel

Woodard’s Bison Coin sculpture at NMWA. Photo by Tammy Christel

Woodard was on hand this summer at the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s Annual Plein Air Festival. The event highlights true plein air artists, but sculptors and non-traditional artists also take part. Woodard’s open, friendly ways stand in contrast to the intensity of his work. That day, Woodard was shaping a piece for a bronze sculpture depicting a buffalo’s profile turned on its axis within a weathered coin’s diameter. Below Woodard and his sculpture, pacing the sage-covered incline, was sculptor Richard Loffler’s buffalo installation. Two “presents” looking back, foretelling America’s future.

An artist’s reception will be held at Altamira on Friday, September 11, 5-8:00 pm, during the Fall Arts Festival’s “Palettes and Palates”ArtWalk.

Billy Schenck: Three Minutes from Eternity. Enquire!

Billy Schenck: Three Minutes from Eternity. Enquire!

Congratulations to Billy Schenck and Altamira Fine Art for Schenck’s encore performance as 2015’s Jackson Hole Fall Arts Festival Poster Artist. This is his second trip down the Featured Poster Artist aisle, and he’s having a blast. Altamira’s website does not post a price for the original~~that’s because it will be auctioned off at the Fall Arts Annual Quick Draw on the Town Square. Bring the big bucks! The Quick Draw is truly Jackson’s favorite Festival happening~~~I believe it’s outpaced Palates and Palettes. Two completely different events, but there’s purity in the Quick Draw. Family Fun. Sparkling fall mornings. Artists on hand in one place, quick on the painting and sculpting draw.

This Schenck is on Altamira’s site. I have to post it. If this doesn’t leave you smiling….I give up!

Billy Schenck - Columbus Discovered the Tetons. Oil on Canvas 35 x 45 inches.

Billy Schenck. Columbus Discovered the Tetons. Oil on Canvas. 35 x 45″



Charles M. Russell (1864–1926) Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in  Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

Charles M. Russell (1864–1926)
Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in
Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

This year’s Jackson Hole Art Auction is two months away; time flies. After all, it’s summer and high art season in Jackson, Wyoming. Stay on your toes, keep a daily eye out for new auction lots! Get your consignments in on time~~2015’s deadline opportunity has likely evaporated. So many impressive consignments arrive at auction headquarters, upstairs at Trailside Gallery, that some must be put forward for your consideration.

Whether it’s market confidence or simply a new method of expanding their buying audience, the auction spreads itself over two days this year, with two separate buying events. The auction, a premier venue for Western masterworks, begins September 18th, 2015.

“The ninth annual Jackson Hole Art Auction will begin with Session I held on Friday, September 18th at Trailside Galleries in Jackson, WY. Session I will be a small well-curated sale of lots by highly desirable contemporary and deceased artists. Session II will be held on Saturday, September 19th at the Center for the Arts,” notes the auction. Both events include free, open-to-the-public preview opportunities.

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4".  Oil $40,000 -$60,000

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4″. Oil $40,000 -$60,000

So, what’s on the auction menu? It’s impossible to provide a full list in this space, but highlights include historic and contemporary works by Bierstadt, C.M. Russell, Bob Kuhn, Carl Rungius, Howard Terpning, Z.S. Liang, Remington, E. Martin Hennings, Clyde Aspevig, Richard Schmid, Harry JacksonEanger Irving Couse, T. Allen LawsonStanley Meltzoff and William Acheff.

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse - Mule Deer (1995)

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse – Mule Deer (1995) Acrylic on Board  14×18″ Estimate: $40,000 – $60,000

Lot estimates range anywhere from four digits to seven.

Though not an official part of Jackson Hole’s famed Fall Arts Festival, the auction is a heady and highly anticipated conclusion to Jackson’s official arts season. Live Western auctions cause attendees and staff to break out in goosebumps. This thing is full of adrenaline~~the auction has become one of the country’s top Western art auctions, each year offering up exquisite paintings, sculptures and artifacts. A co-production of Jackson’s Trailside Galleries and Santa Fe’s Gerald Peters Gallery, the auction is an upscale, professionally organized and thrilling event.

Visit for information, or phone Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan at (866)-549-9276.

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860) oil on canvas 28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902)
Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860)
oil on canvas
28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in
Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000





If you want your art to get noticed and sold here in Jackson, you have to work at it every day, every minute you can. Don’t sit around wasting time watching TV. Your art has to be the best, the highest caliber you can produce, it has to stand out.”  ~ Jackson Hole Artist 


“No animals died in the making of these mounts.” – Jennifer Lee, National Museum of Wildlife Art

Contests and competitions everywhere!  Jackson’s National Museum of Wildlife Art is putting out a national and regional call to artists–including amateurs–to submit “fun faux animal mounts” that will be part of the new Trophy Art Fundraiser. Artists must create fanciful examples of animal trophy heads and deliver them to the museum by February 7, 2014. All works will be on display February 12th – March 15th. All are available for sale on a first come, first serve basis beginning February 22nd, from 11 a.m – 2 p.m., during  “Trophy Art: Fun Forms for All.”


“We were hoping to inspire people’s creativity with this event by letting imaginations run wild,” says Associate Director of Programs and Events Jennifer Lee. “For years the museum has been asked, ‘Where is the taxidermy?’ This event offers a fun way of playing off that theme, including our tagline: “No animals died in the making of these mounts.”

Two works for sale are “Deer #5” by Kelly Vanderveer (above) and “The Lizard” crafted in silver and opal by Jackson Hole silversmith Joni Mack, top of the page.

Participating artists retain 30% of the purchase price they name as a commission for their time and efforts, with the rest of the proceeds going to the museum’s youth education programs. Images already received for the upcoming event include a lizard, mountain lion, elk, pronghorn and deer.

For more information, contact Jennifer Lee at or 307.732.5412.

Joshua Tobey -"Cotton Ball"  Cotton Tail Rabbit. Bronze, edition of 25 7" x 9" x 8"

Tim Cherry -“Cotton Ball” Cotton Tail Rabbit.
Bronze, edition of 25
7″ x 9″ x 8″

New paintings and sculptures are on view at Astoria Fine Art, in Jackson. In particular 2014’s Fall Arts Festival Sculptor Artist Joshua Tobey has some wonderful new wildlife sculptures. At this writing many Fall Arts fans are waiting to see the finished image of Tobey’s winning FAF work, one he hopes will initiate the new FAF tradition memorably.

Tim Cherry and Gerald Balciar also have new sculptures at the gallery; painters Ewoud deGroot, Robert Lougheed (1910 – 1982), Dean Mitchell, Tom Palmore, Al Agnew and Cole Johnson are all represented. Stop by the gallery, on the north side of Jackson’s Town Square. Who said winter was quiet?

Ewoud deGroot - "Snowy Owl"  39.5" x 25.5"  oil

Ewoud deGroot – “Snowy Owl” 39.5″ x 25.5″ oil

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Seven-year Western Design Conference  (WDC) Events Manager Allison Merritt is now the conference’s owner; she purchased the event from Powder Horn Press and the Jackson Hole News and Guide, owners since the show moved to Jackson in 2007.

Merritt plans to expand 2014’s show and sale, she says. WDC will now include a home and interior design feature and “a larger fashion shopping experience.”  The annual, juried conference and show typically awards close to $16,000 in prize money to artisans working with Western genre works. This year’s conference, the big kickoff for Jackson’s annual Fall Arts Festival, takes place September 4-7, 2014.

“My vision is to build on the history of the show while creating an event that brings together every facet of design in the West, and to appeal to markets ranging from young, new customers to established collectors,” says Merritt. “From documented American craft to home design to fashion, we are expanding the show to encompass all aspects of the best of Western design.”

The Western Design Conference was founded 22 years ago in Cody, Wyoming, as a way to promote contemporary artists working with historical American craft methods. Contact Merritt at or phone  307-690-9719.

Photograph by Leine Stikkel

Photograph by Leine Stikkel

Oh Milky Way, what secrets of our galaxy do you hold in/ your spiraling Orion’s arm of comets and planets/and celestial beings…~Jackson Photographer Leine Stikkel. 

Jackson’s photographers are likely very familiar with Leine Stikkel’s photographs of all things natural, quixotic and wild. I’ve known Leine for a couple of years, but too rarely get to spend time with her. She’s a naturalist, a spotter, an adventurer and devoted to the art. Through her lens, she sees the world so uniquely—and I use “uniquely” in its best sense. Earlier this year she and filmmaker Jeff Hogan began a project filming beavers in Grand Teton National Park, but the project was cut short by the government shut down. The two continue working together; keep your eyes open for a new project.


Happily, I ran into Leine on the west bank dike, along the Snake River just the other day. She spotted an avalanche, and we looked at it through her binoculars for a while. She’s launched a blog, “Lens to the World,” where you can view her work and read her close-to-the-heart responses to what her camera’s eye captures. It’s beautiful. Stikkel simply wants to get her photographs and thoughts about what she sees out to the world. Hope this helps.

Photograph by Leine Stikkel

Photograph by Leine Stikkel

“The beaver pond is icing up. Their food storage spreads away from the lodge through the pond water, looking as if a small, branchy tree has fallen from atop the lodge. It will be their food throughout the winter,” writes Stikkel. “All they have to do is dive out of the lodge and right there, under the ice, grab a branch and scoot back in, mmm water chilled alder, aspen or cottonwood tree.”

Were we all able to slow ourselves down and match words to image as she does. Thank you, Leine.

The Scream!!!

The Scream!!!

Jackson’s 2013 Fall Arts Festival is officially behind us; we spend so much time planning for those 10 days in September. When Fall Arts does come ’round, it seems to fly by. The newspapers publish countless pages of special sections focusing on Fall Arts. Everyone advertises, and everyone gets some space. I try to do the same here on the Blog. Spotlighting our truly exceptional arts scene is important for our town and for ourselves. We get a sense that this is what our efforts are all about. The word on the Festival has spread even further; Fall Arts enjoyed more on line publicity than ever before. Google alerts went nuts!

The local paper with the largest circulation and the thickest pile of stories related to Fall Arts also published, the week AFTER their their special Fall Arts sections appeared—in other words, at mid-Festival—an article entitled “Fall Arts effect fades for some. Certain gallery owners no longer count on annual festival to boost summer sales.”


Hmmm. On so many levels! I sent a letter to the editor. In case it doesn’t appear, here’s what I wrote:

Jackson’s art scene has shifted dramatically; as one fine arts consultant commented to me, arts are now a year-round economic industry.

Each Fall Arts Festival culminates a year’s hard work. Fall Arts is a phenomenal marketing opportunity, as the Chamber of Commerce and the relatively new-to-town Design Conference know. Fall Arts is a tourism magnet, a boon for restaurants and lodging. The “Quick Draw” is a swirl of sheer joy, a manifestation of art’s incredible gifts enjoyed by visitors and locals alike.


As wonderful a spotlight as it is, the Festival is not our entire arts season, and banking on it to make or break an arts enterprise has never been a sound plan. Strong annual sales are built upon the number of quality exhibitions a gallery, artist, arts group, museum, or any entity presents over time. Exhibitions and projects establish reputation; reputation is not built on Fall Arts. Fall Arts gets our attention, but collectors and arts enthusiasts keep their eyes peeled all year.

If things aren’t shaking out the way you’d like, don’t cast blame. Innovation and vision, the best artwork and exhibitions, great management, smart budgeting of assets, constancy of ethics, savvy, accountability, outstanding public relations and marketing, knowledge, grace and customer service are success’ building blocks. Those, and the magic of art being created.

Locals, not always comfortable visiting arts venues, feel more comfortable during Fall Arts. They see and enjoy. Word spreads. A friend of mine, highly connected in the arts and otherwise back East, came through Jackson’s galleries for the first time this year. That friend was impressed. Anyone could be walking through your door. Yes, free food attracts people, and you’ll feed them. That’s not news. All sides of a story should be presented—but the assumptions of that article are incorrect. And why place the story when Fall Arts has not concluded?

The point is, if visitors are here, seeing what our arts have going, that’s good. And more people buzz through during Fall Arts than any other time of year. In two years—even sooner!—you may get a fabulous sale. Approach your entire year with that in mind. You are here in Jackson. Most people can’t be here. It’s a choice.

176An info session happened last night, but Jackson artists still have the chance to submit qualifications to create “a site-specific art intervention (possibly the organizers mean “installation,” but I’m a little behind the times, jargon-wise!) at the Pink Garter Plaza, downtown Jackson. The artist whose work is selected must work with Pink Garter businesses on the design, which will  “enhance public space and increase safety in and around the Pink Garter Theatre.”

Individuals or groups must submit their qualifications by 5:00 pm on October 4th. One to three finalists will be awarded $300 to create a project proposal. Winner gets $8,000 to create the work, due by May, 2014.  

“The Artist-Business Partnership is an incredible opportunity for a local artist (or artist team) on a myriad of levels: it will give the chosen artist and their work exposure to the high volume of visitors to the Pink Garter Plaza; it will guide them through the best-practices process of producing a piece of public art; it will help them build a working relationship with business owners; and most of all, it enables them to make a living locally as an artist,”  says J.H. Public Art’s Carrie Geraci. For information email Geraci at