RSS Feed

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives

Posts Tagged ‘Jackson Hole Galleries’

Apr
14
David Grossman - Blossoming Trees - Oil on Linen - 8x10"

David Grossman – Blossoming Trees – Oil on Linen – 8×10″

“No, I said: What kind of bird are YOU?” ~ Sam, to Suzy, upon their first meeting in the film “Moonrise Kingdom.”  

Contemplative, visual poems. Painterly, reminding me of a wistful Childe Hassam; contemporary, like a print; gentle, glowing and linear. Colorado painter David Grossman is one of three new artists signed on to Altamira Fine Art. Grossman is joined by contemporary artists David Michael Slonim and bold trendsetter Thom Ross.

Attribute it to the soft, indecisive changing of our alpine seasons, call it a love of landscape. My heart has been stolen by Grossman’s diminutive oil painting, shown above. He paints, says the gallery, “abstracted visions of forests…melodic in their focus on rhythm and symmetry.” Adds Fine Art Connoisseur: “[Grossman's paintings] effect the comfort and relief of a ‘visual exhale’ while also leading us into meditative contemplation and thought.”

A few brushstrokes and we are eras away in time, lost in a happy composition. 

Thom Ross - Gunman's Walk - Oil on Canvas 48 x 48"

Thom Ross – Gunman’s Walk – Oil on Canvas
48 x 48″

Have you been around Jackson long enough to remember California born artist Thom Ross’ installation at Snow King’s base? “Custer’s Last Stand” was an erected forest of early American soldiers pitted against Native Americans. We walked through and around the battle, and though that battle is one of the West’s most defining moments, Ross’ style is to portray iconic Americans and events in off-beat (gunmen with tiny heads!), sometimes complex and unexpected ways. He can be sensitive and elegiac; friends own an early Thom Ross painting depicting a solitary dead horse, lying on its side. It’s beautiful.

“Indians playing croquet; General Custer riding off while balancing a table on his head; Sheriff Pat Garrett standing with shotgun in hands bracing against the cold of a wintry New Mexico morning – these are a few of the unique images depicted in Ross’s paintings,” says Altamira. In addition to creating his art, Ross runs his own space, “Due West Gallery,” in Santa Fe.

David Michael Slonim - Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas-48 x 60"

David Michael Slonim – Fire and Ice-Oil on Canvas- 48 x 60″

They are landscapes; landscapes deconstructed to layered, broad color fields, conveying essence. Contemporary painter David Michael Slonim is the third “new bird” to alight at Altamira. Plein air painting and illustration are part of his professional artistic experience.

Prisms, shards of translucent glass, collage — these I see in the artist’s expressionist works. Slonim is influenced by a bevy of masters, including Diebenkorn, Mitchell, Motherwell, de Kooning, and Cezanne.

“Although my paintings are derived from nature, they are really about color, shape, texture and line for their own sake,” says Slonim. “I started out as a plein air painter. The more I painted and studied, the more fascinated I became with abstraction. Now I am more interested in interpreting nature than representing nature.”  www.altamiraart.com 

Kyle Pozin - Mystic Warrior

Kyle Polzin – Mystic Warrior -Oil- 74 x 30″

In case you haven’t heard: April 5th’s Scottsdale Art Auction brought in $12.6 million.

Ecstatic press materials report that Frederic Remington’s “The Thermometer from Ten to Thirty-Three Degrees Below Zero,” an oil estimated between $500,000 – $700,000, sold for $920,000, the top sale of the day. Many deceased and contemporary masters did exceedingly well, but, emphasizes the auction:

“The crowd of almost 500 bidders was stunned when a 40-year-old artist from Texas, Kyle Polzin, took the block with a 74 x 30 inch oil entitled “Mystic Warrior.” Estimated up to $40,000, an extended bidding war ended in a hush, as auctioneer Jason Brooks carefully guided bids to a final total of $287,500.”

The Scottsdale Art Auction has now realized over $100,000,000 in art sales over the course of a decade. For complete results, visit www.scottsdaleartauction.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Sep
23
Travis Walker - Ski Fence

Travis Walker – Ski Fence

I’ve been rooting for Travis Walker and Altamira Fine Art to find each other on “ArtMatch.com” and now they have!

Walker is the latest Jackson artist to have a show at Altamira. His exhibition of new works, “In Such an Hour: New Views of Jackson Hole,” runs September 23 – October 6, 2013, and an Opening Reception takes place at Altamira on Friday, September 27th, 5-7:00 pm.

Walker not only makes art; he’s an arts force. If Walker had not landed in Jackson a decade ago, it’s my belief many grass roots arts initiatives would not exist. Artists don’t often take on community leadership roles, but Walker has, and now he’s reaping extraordinary rewards.

“A common subject in my work is the road, which represents our journey through life. We start off staring down the lines of a road, and our entire lives we continue to follow the road to new places. My fascination with roads led me to another symbol in my work: the trailer home,” says Walker. “I have found so many trailers scattered throughout the West that I have come to view them as representations of the American Dream, full of hope, uncertainty, and memory.”

Travis Walker - Saddle Butte (Pink)

Travis Walker – Saddle Butte (Pink)

From the moment he arrived in Jackson Walker began painting it. Most on-location artists (I think we can go ahead and list Walker as a plein air painter—he’s in the “Artists in the Environment” hall of fame and was the first truly non-traditional artist to take part in that program) can be found out in Grand Teton National Park, or anywhere out in nature –and Walker can be found there too. But he also spends much of his time painting the Town of Jackson, essentially creating new iconic images of Jackson. All these subjects entice the artist: an old salon (the former Gai Mode), a decaying house with a fence made of skis (so many have lived there!) and a vintage trailer park.

Walker’s work, notes the gallery, is influenced by American regionalists Edward Hopper and Grant Wood (“American Gothic”), and by Japanese printmaking and German Expressionism.

It often takes years of hard, consistent work to make it in the art world; it’s a challenging, competitive and sometimes heartbreaking life pursuit. But, as we’ve said, arts enthusiasts constantly keep their eyes open, and Altamira director Mark Tarrant has been tracking Walker.

Travis Walker

Travis Walker

“Travis creates very interesting interpretations of local scenes, from his views of Snow King to sweeping views of Flat Creek and the Elk Refuge,” Tarrant observes. “He is a sophisticated painter with a fresh, contemporary palette. We are pleased to present an exhibition of Walker’s work here at the gallery.”

Years ago I wrote a forward for a book about his art that Walker published. Revisiting it, it still feels relevant:

“Walker is a satellite, zooming in and out of our landscapes, freezing vast spaces and solitary formations. We’re light years away from a moment just captured. Flaxen parachutes float forever. Still purple evening shadows never give way to night. These landscapes are our ideal; they’re uninhabited, but histories are embedded. Deserted cabins hold the energy and sadness of generations. Blank windows and headlights, eyes of the universe. Beneath Walker’s surfaces is an extraterrestrial glow he never quite paints down, a light peeking out from behind closed doors.”

Born in Tokyo, Japan and a child of the military, Walker is well acquainted with transience. Place is crucial. Now, at age 37, he’s settled in Jackson with a family of his own. He received his BFA in Painting and Printmaking from Virginia Commonwealth University, and he’s had numerous shows and exhibits over the years. Walker is founder of  Teton Artlab, a non-profit providing studio space for artists. As we’ve reported, Walker was a 2013 panelist for the National Endowment for the Art’ Artists Communities Grant and a 2013 Artist in Residence at the National Museum of Wildlife Art. In 2012, he won the “Rising Star Award” from the Cultural Council of Jackson Hole.

And risen he has. www.altamiraart.com 

Martin Grelle - Scouts on the Buffalo Fork, 2013

Martin Grelle – Scouts on the Buffalo Fork, 2013

$8.39 million…

…is the official total sales amount of this year’s Jackson Hole Art Auction (produced by Trailside Galleries and Santa Fe’s Gerald Peters Gallery), held September 14th, in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. 85% of 284 lots were sold, with 200 phone bidders vigorously participating. The estate of James Grisebaum contributed many important works, and all but one of the 32 works from his estate were sold.

Continue Reading

Sep
18
The Scream!!!

The Scream!!!

Jackson’s 2013 Fall Arts Festival is officially behind us; we spend so much time planning for those 10 days in September. When Fall Arts does come ’round, it seems to fly by. The newspapers publish countless pages of special sections focusing on Fall Arts. Everyone advertises, and everyone gets some space. I try to do the same here on the Blog. Spotlighting our truly exceptional arts scene is important for our town and for ourselves. We get a sense that this is what our efforts are all about. The word on the Festival has spread even further; Fall Arts enjoyed more on line publicity than ever before. Google alerts went nuts!

The local paper with the largest circulation and the thickest pile of stories related to Fall Arts also published, the week AFTER their their special Fall Arts sections appeared—in other words, at mid-Festival—an article entitled “Fall Arts effect fades for some. Certain gallery owners no longer count on annual festival to boost summer sales.”

spot_r_clip_art_26500

Hmmm. On so many levels! I sent a letter to the editor. In case it doesn’t appear, here’s what I wrote:

Jackson’s art scene has shifted dramatically; as one fine arts consultant commented to me, arts are now a year-round economic industry.

Each Fall Arts Festival culminates a year’s hard work. Fall Arts is a phenomenal marketing opportunity, as the Chamber of Commerce and the relatively new-to-town Design Conference know. Fall Arts is a tourism magnet, a boon for restaurants and lodging. The “Quick Draw” is a swirl of sheer joy, a manifestation of art’s incredible gifts enjoyed by visitors and locals alike.

971071_575727195817073_81363745_n

As wonderful a spotlight as it is, the Festival is not our entire arts season, and banking on it to make or break an arts enterprise has never been a sound plan. Strong annual sales are built upon the number of quality exhibitions a gallery, artist, arts group, museum, or any entity presents over time. Exhibitions and projects establish reputation; reputation is not built on Fall Arts. Fall Arts gets our attention, but collectors and arts enthusiasts keep their eyes peeled all year.

If things aren’t shaking out the way you’d like, don’t cast blame. Innovation and vision, the best artwork and exhibitions, great management, smart budgeting of assets, constancy of ethics, savvy, accountability, outstanding public relations and marketing, knowledge, grace and customer service are success’ building blocks. Those, and the magic of art being created.

Locals, not always comfortable visiting arts venues, feel more comfortable during Fall Arts. They see and enjoy. Word spreads. A friend of mine, highly connected in the arts and otherwise back East, came through Jackson’s galleries for the first time this year. That friend was impressed. Anyone could be walking through your door. Yes, free food attracts people, and you’ll feed them. That’s not news. All sides of a story should be presented—but the assumptions of that article are incorrect. And why place the story when Fall Arts has not concluded?

The point is, if visitors are here, seeing what our arts have going, that’s good. And more people buzz through during Fall Arts than any other time of year. In two years—even sooner!—you may get a fabulous sale. Approach your entire year with that in mind. You are here in Jackson. Most people can’t be here. It’s a choice.

176An info session happened last night, but Jackson artists still have the chance to submit qualifications to create “a site-specific art intervention (possibly the organizers mean “installation,” but I’m a little behind the times, jargon-wise!) at the Pink Garter Plaza, downtown Jackson. The artist whose work is selected must work with Pink Garter businesses on the design, which will  ”enhance public space and increase safety in and around the Pink Garter Theatre.”

Individuals or groups must submit their qualifications by 5:00 pm on October 4th. One to three finalists will be awarded $300 to create a project proposal. Winner gets $8,000 to create the work, due by May, 2014.  

“The Artist-Business Partnership is an incredible opportunity for a local artist (or artist team) on a myriad of levels: it will give the chosen artist and their work exposure to the high volume of visitors to the Pink Garter Plaza; it will guide them through the best-practices process of producing a piece of public art; it will help them build a working relationship with business owners; and most of all, it enables them to make a living locally as an artist,”  says J.H. Public Art’s Carrie Geraci. For information email Geraci at carrie@jhpublicart.org.  www.jhpublicart.org 

 

 

 

Jun
03
"Passage #39" - Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x72"

“Passage #39″ – Dan Namhinga. Acrylic on canvas, 84 x 72″

Dan and Arlo Namingha; Theodore Waddell. What a pairing. Altamira Fine Art is the gallery to connect these dynamic, sublime artists in a double show, opening with an artists’ reception Thursday, June 6th, 5-7:00 pm. The Naminghas’ “Form & Symbolism” and Waddell’s “Abstract Angus” are ultimately about interpretation of place. All three artists’ native territories’ images and landscapes course through their veins, exploding on canvas and permeating sculptures.

How exhilirating for Thomas Hoving to compile his can’t-put-it-down biography “The Art of Dan Namingha.” The Namingha family’s history begins with Dan’s great-great-grandmother, famed Tewa/Hopi potter Nampeyo (photographed by Edward S. Curtis, c. 1905). The family tree is an arts dynasty. That’s a regal word to describe a creative clan so rooted in landscape and indigenous culture, but it’s an undeniable accreditation.

How to begin to describe Dan’s remarkable journey as an artist? Namingha’s initial influence was Hekytwi Mesa near the Hopi reservation where Namingha was born. Namingha’s work is phenomenally diverse, the breath of his artistic style is almost impossible to comprehend; he moves from complex arrangements of Hopi mesas, kachinas, spirals, sun and depictions of dual cultures he inhabits to minimalist, graphic, geometric landscapes. As a child, Hekytwi Mesa was the dominant landmark beyond Namingha’s grandparents’ door. Its presence left an endurable mark on the artist’s soul, and some version of Hekytwi Mesa appears in almost every Dan Namingha work.

"West of Oraibi" - D. Namhinga

“West of Oraibi” – D. Namhinga

“The presence of two cultures, he believes, also makes him sensitive to the dual nature of all things—night and day, past and future, then and now,” writes Hoving. Ultimately, Namingha’s exposure to his native culture, wise and encouraging mentors, and 20th century abstract modernism are melded in this remarkable body of work.

"Cultural Images #10" - Arlo Namingha

“Cultural Images #10″ – Arlo Namingha

Sculptor Arlo Namingha, Dan’s eldest son, became involved with carving at an early age. Surrounded by his family’s legacy and practices, his first carvings of Katsina dolls manifested early in life. Positive and negative space, geometric design, cosmology and Hopi/Tewa identity are interwoven in Arlo’s wood, clay, stone, fabricated and cast bronze sculptures.

“Using the idea of design, form and movement, I minimize these literal images not to recreate them but to draw from them and my personal experiences,” writes Arlo Namingha. “My work not only reflects the figurative aspect of my native people and cultural deities but also the idea of scenery and landscape as well as symbolism.”

"Horizon Horses #4" - Theodore Waddell

“Horizon Horses #4″ – Theodore Waddell

Theodore Waddell’s comment to “American Art Collector” about his work and this show is delectable. “Well, the modern guys didn’t like me because I used subject matter,” said Waddell. “And then Western guys didn’t like me because I was too modern.”

Somebody liked him. Waddell’s work is highly influenced by the Abstract Expressionist school. Though the artist didn’t initially realize how important those artists were to his vision, he continues to relate fully to the sense that paint has its own identity.

"Angus DR#24" - Theodore Waddell

“Angus DR#24″ – Theodore Waddell

In this show, we recognize the Montana artist and rancher’s signature painterly landscapes dotted with horses—often so abstracted as to resemble animal tracks rather than mature species. Waddell’s horses, cattle and bison—often black as coal—leave their mark below the thin blue line of Waddell’s mountain skylines. In Montana’s sky, clouds softly wave, like the sea. Waddell has expanded depth and range of color, suggestive of seasonal shifts in atmosphere, foliage and the earth’s tendancy to morph from fertile browns into hardened, impenetrable surfaces.

Alongside these works are fully abstract and interpretational works on paper from Waddell’s “Abstract Angus” series, recently exhibited at the Denver Art Museum. DeKooning is the expressionist I see most reflected in these illusive, amorphic works. They do, as the gallery has said, suggest the drift of grazing animals.

Western art encompasses so much more than the realism many of us associate with the term. But in the West, notes Waddell, we are a part of it all. This exhibition remains on display through June 15th.  To view all of Altamira’s artists, click on their website, www.altamiraart.com .

Camus Prairie Angus | 40/40" - Theodore Waddell

Camus Prairie Angus | 40/40″ – Theodore Waddell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb
14

Robert Farber - Seeing Montana

“American Moods,” an unprecedented Altamira Fine Art exhibition of photographs by acclaimed photographer Robert Farber, will be on display February 14 – March 1st, 2013. An opening reception takes place Saturday, February 16th, 5-8:00 pm at the gallery. Farber will be on hand! There’s no finer gauge of artistic relevance and import on television these days than documentaries produced on the subject by the Public Broadcasting System, or PBS. Farber has been approached by PBS regarding documenting the artists’ life. And what is PBS’ mission? It is to “educate, inform and inspire with essential… programming that enlarges people’s sense of the world.” 

And our view will be enlarged! Part of the exhibition includes five 5′ x 8′ canvas photographs from Farber’s Americana, Classic and New York portfolios. Those will hang in addition to 30 more photographs measuring 30 x 40 inches from the same portfolios; Altamira will show color and black and white images.

Robert Farber - Night Diner

Enlarging our sense of the world, yes. Photographing for over 38 years, Farber’s recognition as one of the world’s greatest photographers has allowed him to lecture at such eminent institutions as the Smithsonian Institute, the George Eastman House, and at universities and professional groups throughout the United States, Japan, Australia and Europe, notes Altamira.

There may never be a greater arbriter of taste than Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. It was she who brought Farber into Doubleday’s publishing house for his book By The Sea, and Farber won the Art Director’s award for color photography. His images have been called analytical, and they may be in that they single out American destinations and states of mind. But Farber’s images are highly evocative, prone to allowing muffled memories of our personal ideals of landscape—urban or otherwise—to float back to the surface.

Robert Farber - One Cow

Remarkably, Farber’s work is not limited to documentary photographs as we think of them~~~images of movements, historic place, profiles and the like. He’s able to transform his work to embrace and brilliantly render major campaigns in the worlds of fashion, beauty and advertisting, and directing for film and TV.

“His painterly, impressionistic style captures the essence of composition in every genre, including Nudes, Still Life, Landscapes and Architecture. His ten photo art books have sold over half a million copies,” notes Altamira. Farber’s nudes were used as examples of artistic application in support of the National Endowment of the Arts, after that organization backed the historic, then very controversial Mapplethorp/Serrano photography exhibition. Farber has received numerous prestigious creative awards, joining the ranks of such photographic giants as Dr. Edwin Land, George Hurrell and National Geographic.

 And speaking of American landscapes and painters, the highly place-based paintings of painter Jared Sanders are also featured, concurrently with this exhibit, at Altamira. Mr. Sanders will also attend the reception~~I’m very much looking forward to seeing his new work!   www.altamiraart.com  

Robert Farber - Evening at the Met