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Posts Tagged ‘Landscape Painting’

Jan
09
Todd Kosharek - Late July, 2013 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Late July, 2013 – 14 x 26″

“What I love in painting, as an artist and as a viewer, is the feeling I get from seeing something…meticulously created by pigment and brush. I want to see time – time taken by the painter to think, feel and create – but also the element of time, as if the painting … will grow and change with me … as I grow and change.” ~ Todd Kosharek

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works, “Interiors/Exteriors,” at the Jackson Hole Center for the Arts Theater Lobby with a reception on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. The exhibition will be on display January 13th – 29th, 2014.

Images of Kosharek’s new works blow me away. In a short time — although Kosharek may not share my conception of  what comprises a “short time” — his landscape painting style has blossomed and matured, gaining a notably new level of sophistication. Kosharek’s painting “Late July, 2013,” shown above, is so rhythmic and complete; it’s like a fine jigsaw puzzle with all the pieces fit perfectly together. He’s thought of everything: a peach sky is reflected perfectly in a body of water. The water, rather than being just a pond or just a river, is both. Space and atmosphere Kosharek builds between land and the sky’s ceiling—those clouds—provides “air” that breathes into the scene and opens it up. He has broadened his color palette without going overboard, limiting his colors and also simultaneously creating the number of subtle shadings required. Kosharek’s brushstrokes are more coherent, more secure, drawing together his composition’s elements.

The growing and changing is happening. Most definitely.

Todd Kosharek - Last of October - 2014 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Last of October – 2014 – 14 x 26″

A remarkable hallmark of Kosharek’s work is that he paints in two blazingly different styles. There are his landscapes, influenced by the Scandinavian Symbolists, and his interior paintings, rooted in the Magic Realist tradition. These fastidiously detailed and mystical works, his Origami Crane Series, consist of 12 large paintings exploring the concepts of repetition and life, religion and art. Kosharek takes many months to complete any given crane painting and is thrilled to be exhibiting three works of the series in this show. At this writing, Kosharek was putting the finishing touches on a crane painting that’s been coming to life on his easel for a full year.

Todd Kosharek - Veneer - 2012 - 66 x 50"

Todd Kosharek – Veneer – 2012 – 66 x 50″

“I throw everything possible into the scene during the sketching and researching process, and then slowly eliminate aspects until the scene clicks and is suddenly correct. This process of elimination will often continue all the way until the painting is finished,” says Kosharek. “Great examples of this process are the three large paintings that are a part of the Crane Series.”

A great painting, adds Kosharek, should encourage and allow viewers to react to space, letting them follow any direction the painting may beckon. His paintings are part of private and public collections throughout America and in Paris.

“Art should not be in a box nor should it be “right or wrong,” nor should it hold the viewer’s hand,” says the artist. “The greatest respect an artist can give an audience is to trust that they will get what they need from the work.”  www.toddkosharek.com

1497504_10202870754911208_157654252_nThursday, January 9th, 7-10 pm, artist Tom Woodhouse’s “creative passion” will be on exhibit and celebrated at the Pink Garter Theater/The Rose, downtown Jackson. The evening is the first in a series of art events happening this month; Tom’s show will change and evolve each week. Paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, abstracts, bar scenes and landscapes will all be featured. And yes, you can buy them!

Contact: Not sure! Posters list the Pink Garter, so give that venue a jingle. Go, Tom!

Last notice: Community Supported Art (CSA) inaugural year applications are due on Monday, January 13th! Read more about the project here, and contact Alissa Davies at csajacksonhole@gmail.com, for more information.

My bad…Public Art announcements were going to appear here, but I promise—next post you will see them!

 

 

 

Jul
14
Glenn Dean -"Rise"

Glenn Dean -”Rise”

New works by painters Glenn Dean, Jared Sanders and September Vhay will be on exhibition at Altamira Fine Art July 15-27, with an opening reception for all three artists on Thursday, July 18, 5-8:00 pm. Each artist brings renewed vision of their respective muses: for Dean, it’s landscapes imbued with a Taos light; Sanders’ renowned paintings of barns and other farm structures continue to accumulate silent power; and Vhay’s horses, accompanied by large-scale renderings of bison, are ever-intriguing.

“When I approach the landscape I try to simplify what I’m seeing. I strive to reduce the noise and look for nice color harmonies as well as positive and negative shapes playing off each other,” says Glenn Dean.

That’s modesty talking—Dean is much more complex than his statement suggests. A relatively young artist (Dean is 31), he has devoted himself to unraveling the complexities of works by great masters he admires; Maynard Dixon and Edgar Payne in particular.  For Dean, Dixon and Payne “painted things the way they were meant to be painted, with a solid sense of form and broad strokes of clean, defining color.”

So, if you’re thinking like Maynard did, you approach landscape painting with spiritual reverence. And you are straightforward in your beliefs, as well as the task in front of you, which, says the artist, is humbling. Something hidden resides in each bit of landscape~~all artists interpret what they see in individual ways, but each personal endeavor brings its own revelation, translated to canvas.

A native Westerner, Dean is California born and now travels and lives in the Southwest. Mountains, deserts, and coastlines are his favorite locations, and within each painting Dean manages to both delineate full shapes and fill them with powerfully blended colors. We are transfixed. The big Western media and invational venues are focused on young Dean: he’s snagged Art and Antiques magazine’s first “Emerging Artist Award,” and won the grand prize AND “Artists’ Choice” awards at the Tucson-Sonoran Desert Museum Invitational.  Wow.

Jared Sanders - "Shelter"

Jared Sanders – “Shelter”

“While some landscape painters relish capturing cheery beach scenes or sun-dappled aspen trees, [Jared] Sanders is drawn to the moody intervals that separate the seasons—the times between fall and winter and between winter and spring when he perceives subtle dramas unfolding.” – Southwest Art

Sanders’ show, “A Spirit of Place,” may certainly be about separation of seasons and the softer side of “idyllic,” but what Sanders has become known for is his ability to render barns and rural structures like the kind he knew as a child in a variety of settings and with a mastery of geometric composition and color. His is art that, at first glance may seem ever-repeating. Look again. With each work Sanders designs in depth, punctuating his compositions with brilliantly placed patches of color. Each work is a soul, and each soul regards viewer.

Sanders’ large, flat, geometric areas of color allow him to introduce those elements of abstraction and design into his paintings.

Sanders is meditative and precise, and his paintings stop you in your tracks. Allowing a long, luxurious amount of time to “read” Sanders’ paintings reaps endless rewards. This show, featuring full landscapes as well as barns, do demonstrate his singular intimacy with nature. He is a careful draftsman, sketching from hundreds of photographs he takes himself, and transfering them—–transforming them—-into his still, contemplative works of soft browns, yellows and pitch-perfect reds.

September Vhay - "Chiefs of the Day"

September Vhay – “Chiefs of the Day”

“Horses, bison, coyotes and deer grace the canvases — and a guest appearance by a hummingbird.” 

September Vhay’s new show, “A Divine Pause,” spotlights “animals both delicate and sturdy,” says Altamira. Vhay’s approach to her work remains classic, with a sense of dimension so palpable it can only come from a highly developed spatial aptitude. Vhay’s architectural background is evident in every work.

“My challenge and subsequent reward,” explains Vhay, “is to reorder reality by distilling it to its essence.” The truth of each subject lies in its essence, and intrinsic in that is great truth, she believes. “It is,” she says, “a pleasure to seek out this essence and to share it with others.”

Altamira sells Vhay’s works almost as quickly as they arrive at the gallery. This time, mule deer and foals share space with bull bison and “regal” horses. In fact, many creatures of the valley are rendered: fox and coyote make peace with each other and defer to a lighter-than-air hummingbird. Vhay deeply explores composition, color, light and expression; her backgrounds are often blank, elevating each creature to a higher status, and allowing their essence to be the work’s sole focus.

I happened to be in the gallery the afternoon Vhay’s charcoal works “Chiefs of the Day” and “Chiefs of Night” arrived. Measuring 30 x 77″ they are monumental in size, and viewers feel these iconic animals’ presence, inhale prairie dust, catch the scent of the buffalos’ hides, feel their hot breath.

“Confidence, power and beauty are intrinsic to September Vhay’s artwork, notes fine art consultant Katherine E. Harrington. “September’s soft touch demonstrates a refined appreciation of her subject. To look at September’s Vhay artwork gives the mind a place to rest.”   www.altamiraart.com

Leonardo_WEB

Watercolor images of wildlife and landscape, as well as works with religious themes by painter Morten Solberg are now on exhibition at Astoria Fine Art.  This is a solo show, but you can meet the artist, who has been painting for decades, at an artist’s reception on Thursday, SEPTEMBER 18th, 5-8:00 pm.

Solberg’s painting “The Artist,” shown at left, appears to be Solberg’s reverent portrait of Leonardo da Vinci.  www.astoriafineart.com

 

Jun
19
Dennis Ziemienski - "Cowgirl Brand"

Dennis Ziemienski – “Cowgirl Brand”

Never just one Altamira artist opening a show at that gallery; two weeks ago a trio of artists kicked off the season. June 17-29th, two new shows with works by contemporary Western artists Dennis Ziemienski and Howard Post will be on exhibition.

Ziemienski’s “New Images of the Old West” and Post’s “Western Perspectives” share an opening reception at Altamira Fine Art on Thursday, June 20th, 5-8:00 pm. Works by these artists are bold; Ziemienski’s crisp, poster-bright paintings recall the best magazine advertising of bygone eras (were “Mad Men” set in the West, and the Sterling-Cooper execs living on ranches, their campaigns might look a lot like Ziemienski’s art), and Post’s Western landscapes are, as has been noted, characterized by a richly colored, contemporary impressionist style.

The West—our region, at any rate—was first discovered in part because of posters commissioned by railroad lines. These travel posters promoted new regions opening up to tourism and Ziemenski, a native San Franciscan, puts together idealistic images of cowboy life with a feel for sharp, witty modernism.

Last century’s big rush west attracts Ziemenski.

Dennis Ziemienski - "Yosemite Drive Thru"

Dennis Ziemienski – “Yosemite Drive Thru”

“I like that period of time because it hasn’t been well recorded,” Ziemienski said. “You don’t see a lot of paintings of cowboys sitting in Model T Fords. But they did – and right alongside their horses. I was born in 1947. Growing up in California and taking car trips with my family allowed me to see a lot of this imagery. But by the 60’s and 70’s, I noticed that much of it was starting to fade away,” he said. “All of the things I witnessed then started to make me think that some day I would like to record those things. So now I am.”

I recently visited Laramie, a city established by the railroads. Laramie is chock full of great vintage signage–some in good shape, some not as much. But they’re there. Such signs and billboards make a native Californian’s heart leap into her throat.

Howard Post - "Western Meadows"

Howard Post – “Western Meadows”

Post is one of my favorite Western contemporary landscape painters. “Contemporary” in the sense that he’s not exactly a realist, and he’s not exactly an “unexpected” painter. His light and compositions are poetic, translucent and depict the West’s golden light just as we imagine it when we can’t be there. Just as we imagine it when we ARE there, and want to describe it to someone who has never gazed upon it.

Post is, says the gallery, known for his unique aerial perspective that, to my mind, emphasizes Western space. Born in Tucson, that region’s special southwestern light permeates his work, no matter the subject matter.

Wherever you’re from, you bring the light with you.

Howard Post - "Riverbed"

Howard Post – “Riverbed”

Post was a cowboy, and when he began painting a few decades back he chose the subject he knew best: Arizona’s ranch traditions and the Arizona landscape. His hayfields are sun-drenched loaves of hot grass, basking in the late afternoon sun, thick purple and green trees in partial shadow. A suggestion of an outline surrounds many of Post’s objects, giving them volume. Post’s are landscapes you want to wake up to, go to sleep thinking about; they are ideal.

“My paintings,” says Post, “Are my visual response to the West and how I want it to be.”

Got that.  www.altamiraart.com

6wm_logofin

“Fewer answers nowadays, but more questions.”  | “Parents wrong, discover my own life.”  | “Created art, I feel better now.”  | “Istanbul highways to National Park trails.”

You thought writing haiku was challenging?

Teton County Library and Culture Front, in collaboration with the Jackson Hole Writers’ Conference, are pleased to present The Six-Word Memoir Project exhibit, debuting June 27th at the Center for the Arts. Sixty Jackson area creative types submitted six-word “snapshots” of their lives; each write up is exactly six words.

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May
20

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“Words create the bridges between us. Without them we would be lost islands. Affection, recognition and understanding travel across these fragile bridges and enable us to discover each other and awaken friendship and intimacy. Words are never just words. The range and depth of a person’s soul is inevitably revealed in the quality of the words used… they also suggest what can never be said.” ~ John O’Donohue, Irish Poet

And so it goes with art. The artists at Trio Fine Art are traveling across bridges, telling us with their paintings what lies in their soul. Springtime, when everything changes, can’t help but put thoughts of summer in our heads.

Plein air painter Bill Sawczuck is watching the landscape. And he acknowledges that painting around here just now can be “challenging.”

195“I can take the cold and gloomy skies, but wind is another thing altogether,” writes Bill. “A painter has to fasten his easel to his vehicle, a tree or a nearby fence to prevent the whole outfit from blowing a dozen or so yards away while working on a “promising ” painting. Spring painting also has many rewards. The unfolding change of seasons offers wonderful opportunities to observe wildlife reacting to melting snow, flowing waters and greening landscapes. New life is appearing everywhere, and it is difficult to concentrate on painting when the spring show is center stage.”

Bill’s painting at left, “Winter Leftovers,” painted on Spring Gulch Road (Bill, do I detect some abstract diagonals and energy in that sky????) testifies to the rancher’s foresight last haying season, says Bill. Soon, new grass will take over as the cattles’ primary feed.

And for painter Jennifer Hoffman, spring has been bountiful. Jen received an “Honorable Mention” in the Wyoming Arts Council’s 2013 Visual Artist Fellowships. (By the way, how awesome is Wyoming Arts’ website? It’s fantastic.) She now has the chance to have work exhibited in the Fall Biennial at The Nicolaysen Museum in Casper this fall. AND, she was awarded “Fourth Place in Landscape” in the 14th Annual Pastel 100, sponsored by the Pastel Journal.

Jen and Trio Fine Art’s third artist, Kathryn Mapes Turner, will both be showing at the Governor’s Capitol Art Exhibition at the Wyoming State Museum in Cheyenne in June. Check out the story on Kathryn’s “OneNest” project here.

Trio’s summer schedule shapes up like this. Jen Hoffman’s Show: July 10 – 27th; Bill Sawczuck: July 31 – August 17th; Kathryn Turner: August 21st-September 7th.  Opening receptions dates will be posted as we get closer! Please remind me, guys!   www.triofineart.com

"Fireflies," - Jennifer Hoffman.

“Fireflies,” – Jennifer Hoffman.

 

“Rocky has completed 14 never before seen paintings now on exhibition at Altamira Fine Art,” reports the gallery. “This new work is painted on canvas using oils and some mixed media. He has revisited a couple of his previous series’ such as the “Archer” and “Horse and Rider” series and has explored a few pieces involving groups of figures in a very minimal setting, not necessarily representing any recognizable background— but presenting bold strokes of shape and color. The painting “Color Bound” explores the early modernist’s cubism style.”

Rocky Hawkins’ new works are on exhibition through June 30, 2013.  Many more exhibits happening soon at the gallery!   www.altamira.art.com 

"Color Bound" - Rocky Hawkins

“Color Bound” – Rocky Hawkins

 

 

 

Jan
31

Mark Nowlin - Landscape, Mixed Media on Paper

“These are all landscapes, I made them on the spot, off the highway, during my drive from Portland, Oregon to Jackson,” says Jackson Hole artist and purveyor of arts supplies Mark Nowlin. Last Sunday, Knowlin took his turn showing and creating art at the new Teton County Library, where—lest you live in a cave—you know that Filament Mind, the huge art installation by conceptual artist Brian Brush has just been completed.

Under the filament tent, a fine cross-section of Jackson’s local artists brought their work to the library. “Stumble on Art in the Afternoons” began by hosting Travis Walker, who blipped on his Facebook page that “the best art I’ve ever seen in Jackson is at the Teton County Library.” Catch any sass, Travis?  (I’m teasing…)

Nowlin, so well known in our arts community, is a great proponent of contemporary art. He owns and operates Master’s Studio, a Jackson arts supply and framing store.  His creativity and knowledge of art history, perspective on Jackson’s art scene and where it might be trending and the region’s arts influences, are topics you should talk to him about sometime.

Nowlin does not exhibit often, but he should. Each of his compositions I viewed last week were dynamic, swinging with motion, affected by place, and wholly recognizable even as they embraced abstraction. Nowlin lined up dozens of works, a visual diary of his travels.

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