Tag Archives: Landscape Painting

Kathryn Mapes Turner Meets Winter 2017

Kathryn Mapes Turner, “Dance,” 48 x 48″.

Kathryn Mapes Turner, of Trio Fine Art, grew up in Grand Teton National Park on her family’s Triangle X Ranch. She’s arguably experienced just about everything a Jackson Hole winter can throw out there.

But, says the artist, there is winter…and there is THIS winter. With little sun, high winds, frigid temperatures and hundreds of inches of snowfall, even this valley veteran turned to accessing her imagination in lieu of accessing 15-foot high snow berms.

“Winters are always magical,” says Turner. “A typical winter brings peace and solitude; it’s a time to scale back, explore internal creative impulses, and ‘save up’ for summer when once again I’ll be able to respond to the sublime stimulation and inspiration of painting out in the field.”

“It’s all made me think back on my anthropology studies. We explored how the arts flourished in communities that had their basic needs met as opposed to communities that didn’t.”

Endlessly fascinating are the transformations snow and ice bring. Winter turns the outdoors into a dream world, simplifying landscapes, paring it down to essentials. But this winter, Turner admits her soul was not buoyed by her favorite winter activity, skiing.

Kathryn Mapes Turner, “Teton Sunrise.”

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Over the Rooftops; Letscher Lands at Tayloe Piggott

Bobbi Miller, “Over the Rooftop,” 6×6″ oil

Moran, Wyoming lies 30 miles north of the Town of Jackson. Last month Moran received almost 40 inches of snow, 10 inches above normal. Jackson has received almost the same amount, but Moran’s isolated location lends itself to days of being no other place than Moran.

It’s a singularly beautiful, remote and a Grand Teton National Park gateway. If you are a plein air painter, Moran offers an infinite number of beautiful locations and constant inspiration.

A Moran resident, Teton Plein Air Painter Bobbi Miller this winter has left her in awe of the Park’s forefathers who battled intense winter conditions without any of the modern conveniences we enjoy today. Confined to painting indoors this winter, Miller’s painting style has veered towards abstraction; quick work and impressions of landscape are intriguing.

“I must admit to putting those foot warmers in my boots when DRIVING to Dubois, Wyoming recently,” Miller confesses. Dubois lies approximately 75 miles east of Moran, and to get there one must travel over the spectacular but potentially very dangerous Togwotee Pass.

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Lee Carlman Riddell’s Winter Wonders; Jivan Lee in Scottsdale

Lee Carlman Riddell, “Cold and Clearing”

“Truth be told, I do not paint outside in the winter. I tried it once, thinking that if Greg McHuron could do it, so could I.” ~ Lee Carlman Riddell 

Greg McHuron, you have no idea the shoes you’ve left to fill. How can we channel your inner snow beast and brave this snarling, ice-jamming winter? There is just one Gregory I. McHuron, and that’s you, dear friend. We miss you, and we are eternally grateful to Susan H. McGarry, who saw the publication of your book through.

Lee Carlman Riddell joyfully participates in countless plein air events in during warmer months. In the winter time she’s a studio girl. Carlman’s work is on constant exhibit at WRJ Associates  (as is her husband’s, photographer Edward Riddell) in downtown Jackson, and her gentle paintings, so elegant in their simplicity and color palette, are immediately identifiable.

Lee Carlman Riddell. “Cottonwoods For Monet.”

WRJ not only understands Riddell’s work; they treasure it. Step through their doors on King Street and her paintings, hung throughout the space, beckon like jewels. Softened jewels~~~colors that understand time and nature’s effects.

“Whenever she ventures outdoors, she sees something new, particularly on routes she knows well; a stand of cottonwoods, passed countless times before, suddenly appears as if plucked from Monet’s Rouen Cathedral paintings,” writes the design group. “Her paintings thus bear witness to her distinctly wide vision, her rare instinct for finding ephemeral beauty.”

As for winter…..after valiant efforts, Riddell prefers the warmth of studio work.

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Wherever We Go, Art is the Heart

I was going to tell you that if I could live on art, I would. Then I realized I already do. And so do we all, in some way or another. Art is, literally, all around us. The keyboard I’m typing on is someone’s imaginiative creation. The lamp on my desk, the paintings on my wall, my books, the clothes I wear (though in my case I have to fall short of calling what I wear “wearable art.” It’s more like “wearable earrings and sweatshirts.”).

Outstanding in her field: Kathy Wipfler.

Recipes are art, the chairs we sit on. Loving one another and sticking by the Golden Rule is an art. That particular rule is, for some reason so difficult to follow. Why is that? It’s so simple to do the right thing. One of the most obvious “right things” is to respond to friends and colleagues when they reach out. When we don’t respond, the thing we remember IS the non-response. That’s not what you want people to remember, professionally or otherwise.

Todd Kosharek at work. Todd’s passion, work ethic and kindness are the best of Jackson Hole’s art heart.

My wish for us this year is to always try to do the right thing. Think it out. Be honest, but balanced. Who are your mentors? Who do you hold up as a hero amongst us? When trying to decide how to act, what choices to make, how to respond, how to walk this earth, I implore you: Do the right thing.

Rocky Mountain Plein Air Painters’ Quick Draw” at the Craig Thomas Discovery and Visitors Center in Grand Teton National Park.

One “compassion researcher” I know of says this: “We are taught that there is a right and wrong way to behave, to act and to think. Stepping outside this construct is a big shift. Non-judgmental acceptance of what it means to embrace all suffering on the planet takes development.”

Plein Air Cowboy Bar!

I’m not religious, but I try to find the good path, make choices that align my soul and help me towards peace and contentment. So often that effort winds up involving huge, ongoing struggles. Breaking things down to day-to-day triumphs is a better choice. Much of the time our thoughts are of the future, one dream after another. I can be guilty of spending more time dreaming than doing, especially during these challenging winter months.

Today my goal is to break that pattern up a little and re-start this blog! I will begin my book in earnest this year. I will work and produce positively to the benefit of arts here as they are related to the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’s phenomenal beauty and the wealth of art in our galleries and superb new generation of artists.

Bronwyn Minton, for “View 22.” I purchased my first “Bronwyn” this year!

I will try to present all forms of Jackson’s visual arts to the best of my ability; none of us relates to EVERY SINGLE work of art, but we can appreciate every effort, love that it exists, discuss art and feel lucky our particular creative vortex is so powerful.

Borbay and Friend. Connecting with this guy was a highlight of the year! He’s really a softie.

And so this first post of 2017 contains some of my favorite images and moments from 2016’s Jackson Hole art offerings and events. Just a very few~~there were SO many! To see more images from the past year, visit my Art Blog Facebook Page .  If you enjoy those posts, please “Like” the page and tell your friends! 

Dean Cornwell (1892–1960)
Portrait,1929. The Jackson Hole Art Auction had some exquisite works.

As ever, my deepest gratitude to everyone who appreciates and reads The Jackson Hole Art Blog. I’m thankful and proud.

David Michael Slonim at Altamira Fine Art.

The Jackson Hole Art Blog’s new header image: Detail from David Michael Slonim’s “Bailando,” at Altamira Fine Art.  

 

Todd Kosharek’s Paintings in Time; Woodhouse Wonders; CSA Note

Todd Kosharek - Late July, 2013 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Late July, 2013 – 14 x 26″

“What I love in painting, as an artist and as a viewer, is the feeling I get from seeing something…meticulously created by pigment and brush. I want to see time – time taken by the painter to think, feel and create – but also the element of time, as if the painting … will grow and change with me … as I grow and change.” ~ Todd Kosharek

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek opens a show of new works, “Interiors/Exteriors,” at the Jackson Hole Center for the Arts Theater Lobby with a reception on Friday, January 17th, 5:30-7:30pm. The exhibition will be on display January 13th – 29th, 2014.

Images of Kosharek’s new works blow me away. In a short time — although Kosharek may not share my conception of  what comprises a “short time” — his landscape painting style has blossomed and matured, gaining a notably new level of sophistication. Kosharek’s painting “Late July, 2013,” shown above, is so rhythmic and complete; it’s like a fine jigsaw puzzle with all the pieces fit perfectly together. He’s thought of everything: a peach sky is reflected perfectly in a body of water. The water, rather than being just a pond or just a river, is both. Space and atmosphere Kosharek builds between land and the sky’s ceiling—those clouds—provides “air” that breathes into the scene and opens it up. He has broadened his color palette without going overboard, limiting his colors and also simultaneously creating the number of subtle shadings required. Kosharek’s brushstrokes are more coherent, more secure, drawing together his composition’s elements.

The growing and changing is happening. Most definitely.

Todd Kosharek - Last of October - 2014 - 14 x 26"

Todd Kosharek – Last of October – 2014 – 14 x 26″

A remarkable hallmark of Kosharek’s work is that he paints in two blazingly different styles. There are his landscapes, influenced by the Scandinavian Symbolists, and his interior paintings, rooted in the Magic Realist tradition. These fastidiously detailed and mystical works, his Origami Crane Series, consist of 12 large paintings exploring the concepts of repetition and life, religion and art. Kosharek takes many months to complete any given crane painting and is thrilled to be exhibiting three works of the series in this show. At this writing, Kosharek was putting the finishing touches on a crane painting that’s been coming to life on his easel for a full year.

Todd Kosharek - Veneer - 2012 - 66 x 50"

Todd Kosharek – Veneer – 2012 – 66 x 50″

“I throw everything possible into the scene during the sketching and researching process, and then slowly eliminate aspects until the scene clicks and is suddenly correct. This process of elimination will often continue all the way until the painting is finished,” says Kosharek. “Great examples of this process are the three large paintings that are a part of the Crane Series.”

A great painting, adds Kosharek, should encourage and allow viewers to react to space, letting them follow any direction the painting may beckon. His paintings are part of private and public collections throughout America and in Paris.

“Art should not be in a box nor should it be “right or wrong,” nor should it hold the viewer’s hand,” says the artist. “The greatest respect an artist can give an audience is to trust that they will get what they need from the work.”  www.toddkosharek.com

1497504_10202870754911208_157654252_nThursday, January 9th, 7-10 pm, artist Tom Woodhouse’s “creative passion” will be on exhibit and celebrated at the Pink Garter Theater/The Rose, downtown Jackson. The evening is the first in a series of art events happening this month; Tom’s show will change and evolve each week. Paintings, prints, drawings, sculptures, abstracts, bar scenes and landscapes will all be featured. And yes, you can buy them!

Contact: Not sure! Posters list the Pink Garter, so give that venue a jingle. Go, Tom!

Last notice: Community Supported Art (CSA) inaugural year applications are due on Monday, January 13th! Read more about the project here, and contact Alissa Davies at csajacksonhole@gmail.com, for more information.

My bad…Public Art announcements were going to appear here, but I promise—next post you will see them!