RSS Feed

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Archives

Posts Tagged ‘Plein Air Painting’

Feb
28

In a few months I will be moving back to the east coast. Family calls. The length of time I’ll be away is temporary and open-ended. I’m grateful, more than I can express, for the loving, caring and supportive messages I’ve received from so many of you. I carry you all in my heart. Posts may “spread out” for a while as I manage logistics, and the Blog may change its focus or form ~~~ but it’s not disappearing. We’re joined, and we’ll remain joined!  Okay, I might write a poem if I keep on. It wouldn’t be a good poem, so time to write about what’s happening in Jackson!

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

Clymer, John, (1907-1989), Buffalo Chase, oil on canvas, 10 x 20 inches

The Jackson Hole Art Auction is rapidly receiving an inventory of fine masterworks to  be auctioned off Saturday, September 14, 2014.  This John Clymer is remarkable! Something about it quickens my pulse. Important artists already represented in this year’s auction: Oscar Berninghaus, John Clymer, Bob Kuhn, Ken Riley and Richard Schmid. Schmid’s diminutive painting of carnations was the surprise star of last year’s auction, selling many times over its estimate. Kuhn’s “Resting Cat”, a 22 x 42 acrylic on board, is estimated at $250,000-$300,000.

“The painting was the last Prix de West entry the artist completed in his lifetime, and was awarded the Major General and Mrs. Don Pittman Wildlife Award,” notes the auction.

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42"

Kuhn, Bob, (1920-2007), Resting Cat, acrylic on board, 22 x 42″

Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan emphasizes that the public is welcome to stop by the auction offices to learn more about this year’s event. As always, the auction is seeking fine art consignments; I expect offerings to be welcomed into the summer season. For a complimentary, confidential evaluation please call 866-549-9278, visit www.jacksonholeartauction.com or stop by the offices in Trailside Galleries at 130 East Broadway, Jackson, WY — or 7330 Scottsdale Mall, Scottsdale, AZ. www.jacksonholeartauction.com

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

Book cover art by Jane Lavino

“The Straw That Broke” is an “environmental thriller” written by Jackson’s Gregory Zeigler; the same author who brought us his recreated tale of Steinbeck’s “Travels with Charlie.” It’s Steinbeck’s 112th birthday as I write this. The National Museum of Wildlife Art’s own Jane Lavino created the cover art, and it’s awesome! What up, girl?  We need a Lavino exhibition! Promotional copy for Zeigler’s book sums up the plot: “A young scientist and free spirit, Lyn Burke, gets caught up in a battle between ecoterrorists and corrupt public officials over water in the drought-stricken desert Southwest. Lyn’s disappearance causes police officer Susan Brand and private investigator Jake Goddard to rush to her aid. Abduction, deceit, and murder threaten a cataclysm that places the entire region in jeopardy.” 

Wow, I’m thinking “Longmire!” If the book is as good as that TV series, it’s going to have you on the edge of your seat. Congrats to Greg and Jane! Check it out: www.gzeiglerbooks.com

Tammy Callens - Through the Aspen Grove - 36x18" Oil

Tammy Callens – Through the Aspen Grove – 36×18″ Oil

Plein air painter and portraitist Tammy Callens has a show of new works at Mountain Trails Gallery, in Jackson. Callens feels these paintings break new ground for her as an artist. I’ve always been a fan. Her work is romantic, impressionistic, marked by realism and personal. Callens has another quality: she’s humble about her work. I feel her intimate landscapes are some of the most captivating in town.

Callens sparked the idea of  pro-actively inviting children to participate in plein air painting demonstrations. She did this unwittingly, two summers ago during one of our “Artists in the Environment” events in Grand Teton National Park. Callens painted a difficult scene with great skill, and her most ardent admirers were young people visiting the Park, making their own memories by painting the wilderness explored on their summer vacations. It doesn’t get better than that! www.tammycallens.com 

Feb
03
Erin C. O'Connor - Untitled

Erin C. O’Connor – Untitled

“The mission of the Atlas Cultural Foundation is to help underserved Moroccans, especially women and children, and improve their quality of life through locally determined development projects.” - Cloe Erickson, Founder

“The people are living exactly they way they have for hundreds and hundreds of years. Stone houses, sheep, goats, a very marginal existence. They are agricultural, but it’s extremely sparse terrain. You can’t truly realize how lush and beautiful it is here until you visit places like these.” – Jackson Artist Erin C. O’Connor

Even the briefest of visits to the Morocco-based  Atlas Cultural Foundation will take your breath away. People, music, swirling rainbows of cloth, smiling children, the purity of souls, laughter, donkeys loaded with grains making their way up steep mountainsides on paths as wide as piece of thread, stone houses seemingly impossible to build…African light on high cliffs, solitary townspeople under tents, illuminated by candlelight.

By Erin C. O'Connor

By Erin C. O’Connor

“These villages,” says plein air painter Erin O’Connor, “are in the High Atlas Mountains, in the middle of nowhere, at the end of a dirt road that probably should have ended 60 miles before it does. It’s unimaginable. The area was the last place for the French Foreign Legion to access, it is so remote.”

Recently O’Connor and a colleague landed the chance to go to Morocco, visit the Atlas Mountains and spend time in the ancient city of Medina, as part of an Atlas awareness-raising initiative. A Montana patron with a strong interest in the organization’s mission financed the trip. O’Connor’s paintings and works by other artists will be offered for sale on February 6th, at a private event in Bozeman, Montana.

“I’d always wanted to go to Morocco. EVERYTHING there is art: the wrought iron on the windows, the tile work, the architecture, the doors, I wanted to paint it all,” says O’Connor. “This opportunity came up,  andI had to say ‘yes.’ It was serendipitous. The funny thing is, I have always considered myself a plein air landscape painter, but being in Marrakesh, in the oldest part the Medina, 8,ooo years old, it was all small alley ways, souks (marketplaces), so many people in such a small place. I was forced to paint in really tight corners! I had two jobs every day: one was to go out and prove just how much my French sucks and the other was to get lost! You go through humbly.”

O’Connor began her trek in the Medina, where she spent almost a week on her own, painting. One day she found herself wedged up in a small souk corner, people pushing by her in huge throngs, very intense for a solitary outdoor artist.

Continue Reading

Dec
04
Jennifer Hoffman - Flat Creek Breakdown

Jennifer Hoffman – Flat Creek Breakdown

Bushwhacking through dense underbrush and tangled bunches of new and old-growth forest one afternoon with two of the three Trio Fine Art artists, I finally “got” what determination means when it comes to plain air painting. I’ve loved and been close to plain air for decades, but rarely get a chance to go with painters to protected, coveted painting sites. This day was different, and following the footsteps of Jennifer Hoffman and Bill Sawczuk as they marked a painting spot on protected land can be defined, without hesitation, as adventure.

When bellowing bull elk bear down on you, suggesting you’d be better off moving some yards to the south, you pick up your paint box and move it. Hoffman tells the story of that day much better than I; We ventured out on the Ladd property. You think you know what you’re doing, but this valley is always full of surprises…read the story here.

Kathryn Turner - Mead Ranch

Kathryn Turner – Mead Ranch

View22: Painting Jackson Hole’s Open Spaces is a collaboration and fundraiser art exhibition featuring the works of artists Kathryn Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk. The exhibition’s opening reception takes place Friday, December 6th, at Trio Fine Art on North Cache. Time is 5-8 pm, with artists’ remarks beginning at 6pm. The exhibition remains up through December 21st. A portion of exhibition sales benefit the Jackson Hole Land Trust.

Drawing inspiration from Thomas Moran, the painter responsible for capturing Yellowstone’s rugged beauty so magnificently that Congress declared it and Grand Teton as national parks, View 22 celebrates the Jackson Hole Land Trust’s conservation efforts that have so dramatically affected our open spaces, and works to further cement the eternal bond between art and nature.

Bill Sawczuk - Hardeman Barn

Bill Sawczuk – Hardeman Barn

This past summer and early fall saw Turner, Hoffman and Sawczuk visiting an array of preserved open spaces, often not available to the public, and painting their landscapes, wildlife and historic valley structures. Besides benefitting the Land Trust, this show shines a light on special land tracts many of us don’t get a chance to see. Or, if you have had the luck to visit them, you may view each of these places anew. Eighteen protected properties were captured en plein air for the project; 23,000 acres have been protected by the Land Trust.

“As full-time landscape painters in Jackson Hole, we have a vital interest in the preservation of open space within our valley. It is the natural beauty found in wide open spaces that inspires our creativity. Through sharing our interpretations of the landscape, we hope to shine a spotlight on the importance of conservation efforts made possible by the Jackson Hole Land Trust,” said Turner, Hoffman, and Sawczuk.

A View 22 produced video of the artists, their activities and several locations they visited can be viewed here.

Land Trust Executive Director Laurie Andrews is thrilled with Trio Fine Art’s commitment. “Through Trio’s artists’ deep understanding of how the valley’s protected open spaces affect their daily lives, and [through] their talent and creativity, they’ve shown us all a very special view of [the Land Trust's] work.”

For more information contact Trio Fine Art at 307.734.4444, or phone the Land Trust’s Leslie Steen at 307.733.4707. Email: leslie@jhlandtrust.org   www.triofineart.com  www.jhlandtrust.org  

Continue Reading

Nov
05
Shannon Troxler - Cobalt and Sapphires

Shannon Troxler – Cobalt and Sapphires

Jackson Hole artist Shannon Troxler has new encaustic paintings on display November 7 – December 27, 2013, at the Teton County Library.  The artist will participate in a free opening reception for her show, “Missing Pages,” on Thursday, November 14th, from  5-7 p.m. An artist’s talk takes place at 6 p.m.

“The title of the show came about because my family and friends would complain that books I lent them had missing pages,” says Troxler. “Each of my paintings will have a clue to a literary subject’s identity, such as a quote—the pages are part of the art—and I’ll have a table full of books I’ve used. The idea is to figure out which painting matches which book; some are very easy and some more difficult.”

Troxler’s project began six months ago when she painted a small work depicting Alice and the White Rabbit for the Art Association’s “Whodunnit.” Once under way, Troxler found it hard to stop.

“I have always had a passion for books, but now I was obsessed. I would wake up and think ‘Oh, I should do Jane Eyre!’ I’d find the book, reread it, decide which pages were relevant, and imagine how Jane would look and how I could capture her in paint and encaustic wax. For Jane, I ended up burning page edges, in reference to the book’s fire scenes. Something I like about this show are the paintings’ layers, meant to reflect each book’s layers of meaning. Some will enjoy these paintings as simple portraits or landscapes, and those who have read these books may pick up on more subtleties,” says the artist.

Shannon Troxler - Emma

Shannon Troxler – Emma

Troxler hopes to encourage discussion of the classics and their iconic characters, so much a part of our lexicon. As a subject, narrative is a departure for Troxler; many artists “shy away” from approaching literary stories in their work, she says. Though she studied art in the classical tradition and enjoys painting figures, she has never wanted to paint portraits and each of these works presented a challenge. Here, Troxler imagines how characters look and feel, a liberating experience. The combination of oil and wax creates lovely, translucent layers, allowing her to carve surfaces with subtle detail.

“I feel like I am just getting started, I can imagine so many more characters and series, musicians and sheet music for example. Cookbooks! I’m beginning to explore the concept of this being a traveling exhibit,” says Troxler.

Shannon Troxler - Twinkle, Twinkle

Shannon Troxler – Twinkle, Twinkle

It’s rather wonderful that book pages and journals, and how women manipulate or interpret the written word, are a reoccurring theme in recent weeks. This must mean something!

For information, contact Adult Humanities Coordinator Oona Doherty, 733-2164 ext. 135, or email odoherty@tclib.org. The library notes that pARTners will also celebrate classic literature November 13-30th, with literary-inspired art by local high school students on display at the library.   www.shannontroxlerfineart.com   www.tclib.org

Scott Christensen - I See a Pale Moon Rising - 24 x 30"

Scott Christensen – I See a Pale Moon Rising – 24 x 30″

Noted plein air painter Scott Christensen will host a November opening for a series of new works at his downtown Victor, Idaho studio. A reception and sale for “A Painter’s Travels”  takes place on Saturday, November 23rd, 3:00 pm, at 10 S. Main Street, in Victor. I will go out on a wintry limb and assume works shall continue to be for sale after that date and into the holidays.

A lovely time of year, and opportunity, to view Christensen’s latest works and meet the artist. For more information contact Casey at 208.787.5851, or email art@christensenstudio.com. www.christensenstudio.com

Crafting glass at Laurie Thal's studio, 2012.

Crafting glass at Laurie Thal’s studio, 2012.

Glass blower Laurie Thal is opening up her studio again this holiday season—come blow your own glass balls! (Sorry, there’s just no getting around that joke!)  It’s a great time, Thal leads participants through each step of the process, and everyone goes home with a beautiful, hand made ornament.

Dates: November 12 – January 12, 2014. Groups of no less than four people can sign up, and the cost is $30/per person–$20 to make a second ornament.  Phone 307.733.5096 or email thallaurie@gmail.com. 

 

 

 

 

Oct
14
Robert Bateman & "Chief"

Robert Bateman & “Chief”

A recent Plein Air Magazine newsletter highlighted the presence of world-renowned artist Robert Bateman at the Susan K. Black Foundation’s Dubois, Wyoming workshop, where Bateman spoke at length on the subject of plein air painting. And, to quote the OutdoorPainter.com on-line article, Bateman is “at the point where his level of success and experience frees him to be very outspoken.” Ah, freedom! At what point do artists begin to feel that freedom? The tipping point differs for everyone. If members of Jackson’s arts community made the trip to Dubois perhaps you’ll let us know how it went.

Bateman discussed plein air from two perspectives: as a tool to better our lives by improving our minds and connecting ourselves to the world around us, whatever our immediate world may be; and as an art form in itself. Bateman, perhaps most well known for his iconic painting “Chief,” part of the National Museum of Wildlife Art’s permanent collection, “ruffled some feathers (and smoothed others) with his praise for certain abstract expressionist artists and his criticism of wildlife art tropes. Bateman stressed the need for mystery in a painting.”

Robert Bateman-Roseate Spoonbill - Courtesy National Museum of Wildlife Art

Robert Bateman-Roseate Spoonbill – Courtesy National Museum of Wildlife Art

“Chief,” a massive painting ( 71 x 98″) depicts an American bison emerging from a mist; brown prairie grasses or  late-season sage is suggested in the painting’s background. Bateman’s early art was abstract, but, says the museum, after being inspired by the works of Andrew Wyeth, Bateman turned to realism; his art was mentioned prominently by Fine Art Connoisseur’s editor Peter Trippi. Read the OutdoorPainter.com article and view their Youtube Video interview with Bateman here.

Wendell Field, on location in Grand Teton National Park

Wendell Field, on location in Grand Teton National Park

“Wendell Field: An Artist’s Work,” Jackson Hole painter Wendell Field’s first solo show of works this year, opens on Friday, October 18th, 4:30 – 8:30 pm, at Teton Art Lab, 130 South Jackson Street~~that cute yellow house that cradles artists so perfectly. Field plans on exhibiting a dozen paintings, many of them created near Field’s home in Kelly, Wyoming.

“I’ll have a new print based off drawings I did on Static Divide, looking north in Grand Teton National Park; it’s a woodblock reproduction print—a carved block printed with a mixture of pigment, rice paste and mica dust. Then it’s carved again, printed until the block is destroyed, and the print complete,” says Field. “Each print is a good study base for paintings, and for art fans it’s affordable, original, hand-made art.”

Wendell Field - Mormon Row, Toward Jackson Peak

Wendell Field – Mormon Row, Toward Jackson Peak

During Travis Walker’s über successful art exhibition at Altamira Fine Art, Field and I had a chance to talk about some of the gallery’s artists. Specifically we looked closely at Glenn Dean’s paintings, an artist Field says “speaks to him.”  He considers Dean’s work out of the ordinary, even “surprising” in style. Comparing Dean’s work to another artist’s, Field said that the former’s rendition of landscapes was a choice Field understood. Dean, of course, recently won the very prestigious Maynard Dixon Gold Thunderbird Award—so Field’s estimation of Dean’s work is not unwarranted.

Wendell Field - Western Motel

Wendell Field – Western Motel

Though their painting styles differ, the two artists would enjoy each other’s company. Field’s images of mountains, snow, clouds, and structures are voluminous, rolling towards us, exhibiting a fairytale-like quality. He has developed a distinct color palette that turns real locations into magical destinations, and his paintings reflect his printmaking proficiency.

I’m looking forward to seeing Wendell Field’s new work!  www.wendellfield.com

3947_580

Here comes the magic Altamira Fine Art bus! Late last week the gallery announced that Jackson artist Travis Walker is the newest addition to the gallery’s roster of fine artists.

Prior to Walker’s recent inaugural Altamira exhibition, gallery director Mark Tarrant remarked on Walker’s fresh and wholly unique color palette and compositions. Walker’s images of Jackson—downtown scenes as well as depictions of the region’s great natural landscapes and landmarks—have truly become iconic, big markers on Jackson’s arts timeline. That first show, “In Such an Hour: New Views of Jackson Hole,” sold out.

Tarrant noted that the gallery is slow and deliberate in its approach to adding artists, inviting a new artist on board perhaps once a year.

“Travis’ innovative artwork is a welcome addition to the gallery,” Tarrant said. “We are all extremely pleased, and we are excited to see what he does next. Collectors from Jackson and around the nation expressed their appreciation of Walker’s unique style and vision.”

“ArtMatch.com” is a registered trademark now. I KNEW it. Yay!!!  www.altamiraart.com