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Posts Tagged ‘Wyoming Arts Council’

Mar
04

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Tonight! 7:00pm until 9:00pm (Chance of Snow 39°F / 27°F).  At Elevated Grounds, West Bank, Wilson, Wyoming.

Arts entrepreneur Lyndsay McCandless presents mixed media paintings by Pilar Bass, visual expressions of her experiences submersed in the natural world. Bass uses textures and marks to capture landscape atmosphere and essence. Encaustics allows the artist to explore mixing a passion for black & white photography and watercolor with the “luscious textures and qualities of the wax.”

CLICK-wcroughtrade

The WAC (via Camellia El-Antably) reminds us that the Visual Arts Fellowship deadline is March 10th. Applications are made through CaFE. More information available on WAC’s web page and also in CaFE; do a search for Wyoming Arts Council Visual Arts Fellowships.

Registration for the wonderful CLICK is now open. CLICK takes place April 4-6th, in Fort Washakie. Good room rates, too! You can find out more about registration and lodging at WAC’s CLICK online registration page.

mapDirectionsLots of changes at the National Museum of Wildlife Art (NMWA). Seventeen-year Western Visions Director Jennifer Lee is moving on. She’ll be working with the Community Resource Center of Jackson Hole, and new museum Director of Programs & Events Becky Kimmel is taking Jen’s place. Western Visions has cut this year’s artist roster by at least 60; I believe you can find a list of participating artists by visiting their website. Becky, if you need a get-up-to-speed primer on artists and wildlife art, you’re about to get one! Good luck!

“I cherish the experiences I have had working for the museum and the wonderful group of people I have known, especially the artists and everyone associated with Western Visions,” notes Lee. I offer Jennifer my respect and thanks for powering Western Visions all these years; it’s a massive job. Contact the new boss, Becky Kimmel, at bkimmel@wildlifeart.org.

Additionally, NMWA’s CEO and Executive Director Jim McNutt has joined the Board at the Art Association. Recently NMWA’s former head of development, Pontier Sackrey, became the new development leader at Jackson’s Center for the Arts, which houses the Art Association.  www.wildlifeart.org  www.artassociation.org  

Oct
18

 For Annie~~Eleven Years. 

Terry Tempest Williams - Courtesy Coyote Clan

Terry Tempest Williams – Courtesy Coyote Clan

“Once upon a time, when women were birds, there was the simple understanding that to sing at dawn and to sing at dusk was to heal the world through joy.” ~~Terry Tempest Williams

The Wyoming Arts Council’s annual conference came to Jackson Hole this year, and attendees were treated to a closing keynote by Terry Tempest Williams. She was intimately present, and if you were lucky enough to hear her that afternoon you’ll carry the occasion in your heart a long while.

Williams had thought to read from her latest book, “When Women Were Birds.” Instead, she chose to address a question put to her by the Wyoming Art Council’s Karen Stewart: “How have the arts affected your life?” 

"When Women Were Birds" by Terry Tempest Williams

“When Women Were Birds” by Terry Tempest Williams

Our cavernous conference room became an intimate campfire gathering. A place to hear stories, a place to have your heart stirred. Williams’ childhood summers were spent in Wyoming; in remembering those family traditions and travels, Williams said that Wyoming winds, time and the freedom of open spaces that create open minds shaped her. Days and nights spent curled up Mardy Murie’s feet, inhaling the wisdom of ages, breathing in stories, creating memory.

A trail of Wyoming art winds its way through Williams’ life. Each of her books began and ended in Wyoming. “Refuge” took its first breaths at UCross. Williams spoke of discovering works by legendary Wyoming artists like Jackson and Rungius. Her climate-themed collaboration with Jackson artists Ben Roth and Felicia Resor, “Council of Pronghorn,” elicited deep emotion (Roth drove the installation to NYC in a van, arriving just as one of the biggest storms that city has known was preparing to land. Roth had never been to NYC, and he found the streets empty. He was, said Williams, a messenger.) She reminded us that the best literary art is local; Hemingway, Faulkner—it’s all about place. We migrate, but ultimately we are a place-based species. Wyoming artist Neltje’s fluid brushstrokes inspired Williams to sweep her own sumi brushstrokes across blank paper before beginning any book.

Literature will always matter, Williams said, and art has always been waking us up. Early in her writing career, a mentor encouraged Williams to “sharpen her writing pencil,” to boldly speak about the essential nature of beauty and art in our lives.

“My wish for art education is that it continue to be taught. Arts create wholesome citizens, and we should weave art into other education disciplines and institutions. Conversation and the arts can lead to policy, and government should support the arts with no strings attached, no censorship. Trust artists; what they create is part of the roots of free speech,” Williams told the audience.

Neltje - Audible Breath Triptych - Acrylic

Neltje – Audible Breath Triptych – Acrylic

The Wyoming Arts Council blogged on Williams’ “Weather Report” project, a series of meetings Williams took with UW students and students around the state gathering and sharing stories of what it is like to live in Wyoming; to talk, as Williams described it this week, about “What keeps you up at night? What is your own ‘weather report?’ “

As Boomerang reporter Eve Newman wrote: “The energy boom in Wyoming means watching development taking over open spaces. It means jobs that keep families together. It means oil and gas executives feeling vilified. It means dead cottonwoods across ranch land.

Wyoming Arts Logo - Detail

Wyoming Arts Logo – Detail

Every Wyoming resident has a story about living in Wyoming. For many, those stories have to do with the latest boom cycle and the unprecedented change that’s affecting the land and the people. For others, their stories are about displacement, loss, love, racism, isolation, tolerance or opportunity.”

Newman also quoted Williams as saying that she believed students were able to bear witness to the power of stories, and heard the force of their own voices.

At the Aspen Institute, Williams participated in the Story Swap Project, an international interaction of citizens telling one another their stories, swapping roles, and building “bridges of understanding.”

Throughout her WAC keynote, Williams’ voice captured our hearts and minds. Throughout, she remained emotional, excited, open, receiving. We received. I know no other writers as eminent as Williams possessing an instinct to share so unselfishly, or who provide such lasting gifts inside an hour’s lecture. We are grateful.

“Once upon a time, when women were birds….”

Dove

 

May
20

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“Words create the bridges between us. Without them we would be lost islands. Affection, recognition and understanding travel across these fragile bridges and enable us to discover each other and awaken friendship and intimacy. Words are never just words. The range and depth of a person’s soul is inevitably revealed in the quality of the words used… they also suggest what can never be said.” ~ John O’Donohue, Irish Poet

And so it goes with art. The artists at Trio Fine Art are traveling across bridges, telling us with their paintings what lies in their soul. Springtime, when everything changes, can’t help but put thoughts of summer in our heads.

Plein air painter Bill Sawczuck is watching the landscape. And he acknowledges that painting around here just now can be “challenging.”

195“I can take the cold and gloomy skies, but wind is another thing altogether,” writes Bill. “A painter has to fasten his easel to his vehicle, a tree or a nearby fence to prevent the whole outfit from blowing a dozen or so yards away while working on a “promising ” painting. Spring painting also has many rewards. The unfolding change of seasons offers wonderful opportunities to observe wildlife reacting to melting snow, flowing waters and greening landscapes. New life is appearing everywhere, and it is difficult to concentrate on painting when the spring show is center stage.”

Bill’s painting at left, “Winter Leftovers,” painted on Spring Gulch Road (Bill, do I detect some abstract diagonals and energy in that sky????) testifies to the rancher’s foresight last haying season, says Bill. Soon, new grass will take over as the cattles’ primary feed.

And for painter Jennifer Hoffman, spring has been bountiful. Jen received an “Honorable Mention” in the Wyoming Arts Council’s 2013 Visual Artist Fellowships. (By the way, how awesome is Wyoming Arts’ website? It’s fantastic.) She now has the chance to have work exhibited in the Fall Biennial at The Nicolaysen Museum in Casper this fall. AND, she was awarded “Fourth Place in Landscape” in the 14th Annual Pastel 100, sponsored by the Pastel Journal.

Jen and Trio Fine Art’s third artist, Kathryn Mapes Turner, will both be showing at the Governor’s Capitol Art Exhibition at the Wyoming State Museum in Cheyenne in June. Check out the story on Kathryn’s “OneNest” project here.

Trio’s summer schedule shapes up like this. Jen Hoffman’s Show: July 10 – 27th; Bill Sawczuck: July 31 – August 17th; Kathryn Turner: August 21st-September 7th.  Opening receptions dates will be posted as we get closer! Please remind me, guys!   www.triofineart.com

"Fireflies," - Jennifer Hoffman.

“Fireflies,” – Jennifer Hoffman.

 

“Rocky has completed 14 never before seen paintings now on exhibition at Altamira Fine Art,” reports the gallery. “This new work is painted on canvas using oils and some mixed media. He has revisited a couple of his previous series’ such as the “Archer” and “Horse and Rider” series and has explored a few pieces involving groups of figures in a very minimal setting, not necessarily representing any recognizable background— but presenting bold strokes of shape and color. The painting “Color Bound” explores the early modernist’s cubism style.”

Rocky Hawkins’ new works are on exhibition through June 30, 2013.  Many more exhibits happening soon at the gallery!   www.altamira.art.com 

"Color Bound" - Rocky Hawkins

“Color Bound” – Rocky Hawkins

 

 

 

Jan
21

Friday, January 25th, San Francisco’s Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA) curator of painting and sculpture Janet Bishop will visit the Art Association for a free lunch time discussion. As I write this, I have inquiries out as to the precise format this discussion will take. No firm answers yet. The gathering is billed as a “brown bag lunch.” Bishop has her finger on the pulse of contemporary art in one of this country’s most acclaimed contemporary museums, in one of the country’s most diverse and creative cities. My hope is her talk is well-attended and that her time with us is structured; we’ll gain so much more if it is. So will Bishop.

What would YOU discuss with Janet Bishop?

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Oct
04

A neat, highly visible and connection-building arts job is posted by the Wyoming Arts Council. The Council’s “Arts Education Programs Specialist” would be based in Cheyenne, and travel around the state is part of the picture. Pay is good; the posting says the job may pay up to a high range of over $4,000 per month. Do the math, that’s $48,000 annually. You could almost live in Jackson on that!  The job description sounds terrific, and as is the case when times are tough, extensive. Qualifying candidates should have a solid general knowledge of the arts, including visual, performing, music and literature. The purpose of the position is to “ develop, support, and advocate for arts education for all Wyoming citizens. Arts education for all ages is a key goal in the Arts Council’s long range plan, and is part of the education and outreach criteria in the Department of State Parks & Cultural Resources strategic plan.”

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