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Jul
29
Todd Kosharek: "Provisions."

Todd Kosharek: “Provisions.”

“‘Provisions.’–Almost finished. Started it over two years ago. I love working on these large, long term paintings, life moving along as I paint them. So much gets absorbed into them.” ~ Todd Kosharek

Jackson artist Todd Kosharek is, as we speak, finishing up the last of two new pieces for his next solo show, “Folded: Symbol.” The exhibition opens August 1st at Daly Projects Gallery and is comprised, Kosharek shares, of ten new paintings exploring the symbolism of origami cranes as a symbol for Peace. The show remains up through the month.

“These paintings are the ones that explore the idea of Peace in various forms,” Kosharek writes. “Peace through principle, peace through expression, peace through practice – these are the titles of some of the paintings in the show. Some works explore these ideas as actual documents folded into cranes; some explore more abstractly. I’m also showing four of my latest portraits, including “Golden Boy,” my first portrait of (my son) Weston.”

Todd Kosharek - Peace Through Principle. 14x26"

Todd Kosharek – Peace Through Principle. 14×26″

Kosharek has been so busy researching, designing and painting he’s barely had time to photograph his work. A miraculous ability to balance daily family life — he is a new father — and paint to near perfection, not concerning himself with the length of time he puts into a work, is evident. One work, “Peace Through Practice – The Nobel Peace Prize” depicts origami cranes imprinted with the words of Alfred Nobel, Martin Luther King, Jimmy Carter, Gorbachev and the Dali Lama. All in their original handwriting.

“Provisions” is a masterpiece. It has the detailed mystery of a Zen garden; thousands of stories folded into one. A dining room set is at once anchored and weightless. Kosharek sets the scene by nesting rectangles inside of one another, each leading the eye to where it needs to go. Cranes rest at each place, and below the floor-table are more cranes, more “provisions.” What look like artist’s supplies are painted lower left~~a self-portrait? We’re looking inside Kosharek’s mind, his spirituality. Though this interior is dark, curtains part to reveal a bright, snowy scene. Against the window is a bare, dead tree. But beyond it is a lush forest of evergreens, a snowy white path to wherever Kosharek wants to travel. “Provisions” is at once mysterious, a bit prophetic and…peaceful. www.toddkosharek.com

Todd Kosharek. "Peace Through Transcendence. 10x16"

Todd Kosharek. “Peace Through Transcendence. 10×16″

Jul
27
Dennis Ziemienski-Wyoming Cowgirl. Oil on Canvas  60x40"

Dennis Ziemienski-Wyoming Cowgirl. Oil on Canvas 60×40″

Join painter Dennis Ziemienski at Altamira Fine Art for an opening reception and artist’s talk on on Ziemienski’s new show, “Visions of the New Old West,” on July 30th, 5:30-7:30 pm. The show remains on exhibit July 27-August 8.

As time passes, disputes over what is considered true Western art have volubly (in the sense of expanding lung capacity) lessened. We are, as this show’s title suggests, evolving yet again. Recently I attended a Yale University Art Gallery talk on Whistler’s etchings and their influence over artists of his age; conversely, Whistler was influenced by his peers. Put all these artists’ works together, and the effects are clear as day.

“Nothing is really ever new,” remarked the university’s etchings curator. “Everything springs from another era some way, somehow.”

Dennis Ziemienski, Wig Wam Nocturne Oil on Canvas 36 x 36 inches

Dennis Ziemienski,
Wig Wam Nocturne Oil on Canvas 36 x 36 inches

The West—our region, at any rate—was first discovered in part because of posters commissioned by railroad lines. These travel posters promoted new regions opening up to tourism and Ziemenski, a native San Franciscan, puts together idealistic images of cowboy life with a feel for sharp, witty modernism. His work melds love of traditional Western aesthetic and everything new the West has absorbed for decades.

How unlikely to think of Whistler’s work while considering Ziemenski’s; the former show included a nocturne, and Altamira’s includes Ziemienski’s “Wig Wam Nocturne,” shown above. It’s one of my favorites. See how the artist lines up his composition, playing the tipi’s inverted “V” against a parked car’s tailwing rear lights? Perfectly placed zig-zags (symbolizing mountains?) echo a line of violet sunset clouds. A lighted door beckons.  www.altamiraart.com.

Jul
24
Jason Rohlf, Navigate, 2013 Acrylic & Collage on Canvas, 24 x 90 in.

Jason Rohlf, Navigate, 2013 Acrylic & Collage on Canvas, 24 x 90 in.

He had me at “palimpsest.”

Jason Rohlf’s new exhibition at Diehl Gallery in Jackson, Wyoming looks to have what it takes to be a really fresh, exciting show. At least that’s what images suggest. So engaging are Rohlf’s pinwheel bright paintings they prompted me to read the man’s “biography.”

It isn’t a biography; it’s an artist’s statement. It’s wordy and needn’t be, but there’s “palimpsest!”

Jason Rohlf, Parted, 2013 Acrylic on Linen, 12 x 9 in.

Jason Rohlf, Parted, 2013
Acrylic on Linen, 12 x 9 in.

“Like an urban palimpsest many of the most thoughtful moments occur as these conflicting efforts achieve harmony and then begin to recede resulting in the melding of competing ideas,” says Rohlf.

What he means is that when he’s working, new ideas and “elements from the past” collide and layer. Hard fought details, he notes, likely “earn a swift opaque top coat as a result of each days [sic] fits and starts.”

Other works depict birds. Rolf’s birds are struck through with color, into a branch, and further. The hope, says Rohlf, is to express “intimacy shared between the activity and its effect on the environment it occupies.”

“Jason Rohlf: Views from Here” is on exhibition at Diehl Gallery through August 11th, 2015.  www.diehlgallery.com

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Logan Maxwell Hagege, Family Tradition, oil, 20 x 30"

Logan Maxwell Hagege, Family Tradition, oil, 20 x 30″

Trailside Galleries’ month-long “Masters in Miniature” invitational exhibition includes up to 200 small works by Trailside’s artists. In its fifth year, the Miniatures Show is ever more popular. The show provides quantity, quality, and economy for those getting a taste of Western style art. From “tightly painted” to impressionistic canvases, it’s easy to spend hours perusing. The exhibit is in its final days, so scoot!

Tim Solliday, Three Close Friends, 32 x 46.

Tim Solliday, Three Close Friends, 32 x 46.

Trailside never rests. At any given time during the summer the gallery offers a multitude of showcases and exhibitions. Works are available for straight purchase or by “draw.” An ISSUU catalog illustrates “A Western Convergence,” with masterful works by Bill Anton, Logan Maxwell Hagege, Z.S. Liang, Tim Solliday and Jim Norton. All with their own view of the West. www.trailsidegalleries.com 

Jul
20

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I can’t claim this is a “trailer,” because it’s not. But that’s a trailer, up there. The former “trailer” would be a preview of what the trailer (up there) is all about, and you may already know because you’ve read about it in the papers, in press releases, etc. The trailer (up there) is one of Jackson Hole Public Art’s new ventures.

Because both trailers are out there I can offer only the remaining dates the trailer (up there) will be making stops around Jackson Hole. They are:

August 1 & 2: Jackson Hole Land Trust’s FoundSpace, Karns Meadow
August 8: Jackson Hole Farmers Market, Town Square 
August 20: POP, North Park on North Cache
 
Ben Roth's Public Art bike racks engaged this boy's creative spirit.

Ben Roth’s Public Art bike racks engaged this child’s creative spirit.

“The Mobile Design Studio is designed to engage the community in the public art process. It’s an on-the-move, imaginative placemaking kit of parts – including café seating, planters, and temporary art – that transforms the space around it through improvisational, creative interventions,” writes JHPA in its release.

After reading this information a few times my impression is that the trailer (up there) is a roving hangout with café style seating on board. Just as art exhibits at Pearl Street Bagels or the Brew Pub rotate, so does the trailer’s (up there) art.
Public Art is always free!

Public Art is always free! Yay!

It’s unclear why the phrase “creative intervention” is used. The word “intervention” forcefully connotes “inserting-yourself-in-the-middle-of-something” or “encouraging-an-addict-to-get-help.”

I think what the trailer (up there) really wants to accomplish is to connect people with creativity. That’s a nice thing. Good luck, trailer (up there)! www.jhpublicart.org

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All kinds of Pop Up Art!

All kinds of Pop Up Art!

Friday, July 24th,  5:00pm – 8:00pm, go check out a groovy pop-up shop, with hand made art by some of Jackson’s favorite young artists. So terrific, these pop-ups! Relatively inexpensive to produce, I would think. It’s happening at Teton Art Lab , 130 S. Jackson Street, in Jackson. Artists include: Lisa Walker Handmade, Eleanor Anderson , Ben Blandon, Rob Hollis, Valerie Seaberg and more. I don’t have contact info, but Seaberg and Walker are the gals to call. Or text, or email, or fb message……Have fun! www.tetonartlab.com 
Jul
13
Charles M. Russell (1864–1926) Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in  Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

Charles M. Russell (1864–1926)
Menu (Cafe Noir) (ca. 1896) watercolor and pencil on paper 6 x 4 (sight) in
Estimate: $40,000–$60,000

This year’s Jackson Hole Art Auction is two months away; time flies. After all, it’s summer and high art season in Jackson, Wyoming. Stay on your toes, keep a daily eye out for new auction lots! Get your consignments in on time~~2015’s deadline opportunity has likely evaporated. So many impressive consignments arrive at auction headquarters, upstairs at Trailside Gallery, that some must be put forward for your consideration.

Whether it’s market confidence or simply a new method of expanding their buying audience, the auction spreads itself over two days this year, with two separate buying events. The auction, a premier venue for Western masterworks, begins September 18th, 2015.

“The ninth annual Jackson Hole Art Auction will begin with Session I held on Friday, September 18th at Trailside Galleries in Jackson, WY. Session I will be a small well-curated sale of lots by highly desirable contemporary and deceased artists. Session II will be held on Saturday, September 19th at the Center for the Arts,” notes the auction. Both events include free, open-to-the-public preview opportunities.

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4".  Oil $40,000 -$60,000

E. Martin Hennings, Untitled. 18.5 x 15 1/4″. Oil $40,000 -$60,000

So, what’s on the auction menu? It’s impossible to provide a full list in this space, but highlights include historic and contemporary works by Bierstadt, C.M. Russell, Bob Kuhn, Carl Rungius, Howard Terpning, Z.S. Liang, Remington, E. Martin Hennings, Clyde Aspevig, Richard Schmid, Harry JacksonEanger Irving Couse, T. Allen LawsonStanley Meltzoff and William Acheff.

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse - Mule Deer (1995)

Bob Kuhn (1920–2007) Winter Browse – Mule Deer (1995) Acrylic on Board  14×18″ Estimate: $40,000 – $60,000

Lot estimates range anywhere from four digits to seven.

Though not an official part of Jackson Hole’s famed Fall Arts Festival, the auction is a heady and highly anticipated conclusion to Jackson’s official arts season. Live Western auctions cause attendees and staff to break out in goosebumps. This thing is full of adrenaline~~the auction has become one of the country’s top Western art auctions, each year offering up exquisite paintings, sculptures and artifacts. A co-production of Jackson’s Trailside Galleries and Santa Fe’s Gerald Peters Gallery, the auction is an upscale, professionally organized and thrilling event.

Visit www.jacksonholeartauction.com for information, or phone Auction Coordinator Jill Callahan at (866)-549-9276.

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902) Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860) oil on canvas 28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000

Albert Bierstadt (1830–1902)
Wind River Country Wyoming (ca. 1860)
oil on canvas
28 1/4 x 39 1/2 in
Estimate: $1,000,000–$2,000,000